Appropriate bedside manners

14 05 2008

Do you prefer a doctor that is crying at the bedside or rather one that stays calm and keeps at a professional distance???

My previous post on Etiquette Based Medicine also dealt with ‘correct’ attitudes of doctors towards their patients. Here I quoted Dr. Khan who believes that “patients may care less about whether their doctors are reflective and empathic than whether they are respectful and attentive”. His opinion is shared by many, but certainly not by all. I allready cited a British Journal of General Practice issue on doctor-patient communication, where different viewes were presented. Well, the debate is still ongoing. In the NY Times of 22nd April was a interesting piece about physicians crying at the bedside: At Bedside, Stay Stoic or Display Emotions? [*requires registration].

Some excerpts:

“A young doctor sat down with a terminal lung cancer patient and her husband to discuss the woman’s gloomy prognosis. The patient began to cry. Then the doctor did, too.

At a recent meeting of the Society of General Internal Medicine, Dr. Anthony D. Sung of Harvard Medical School and colleagues reported that 69 percent of medical students and 74 percent of interns said they had cried at least once.

In the 1988 PBS documentary “Can We Make a Better Doctor?” a Harvard medical student, Jane Liebschutz, sees her patient unexpectedly die during a cardiac bypass operation. She suddenly bursts into tears and wanders away from her colleagues until the chief surgeon, who has witnessed what happened, assures her that her response was natural.

Dr. Benita Burke, skipped lunch to spend extra time with her cancer patients. They dubbed this time “mental health rounds,” during which they could address issues that were not strictly medical. Many times, Dr. Burke would wind up in tears or giving an embrace.

The comments in the NY Times and at two blogs (DB’s Medical Rants and Clinical Cases and Images) are also worth reading. These responses illustrate that there is not one truth. Whether strong emotions like crying are appropriate depends on the doctor, the patient, the situation and where and how emotions are expressed. Most patients do not seem to appreciate outright crying at their bedside as it makes them insecure. A crying doctor might also feel like a final verdict: no hope is left. But nobody would blame an intern for crying with his or her mates. And a doctor who cries in front of the patient’s family when sharing information about a serious medical error might help to accept what happened.

So, what kind of doctor would you prefer?

I agree with Dr Hiram Cody, cited in the NY Times, who cautions against excess emotions. Although Dr. Cody emphasizes the need for doctors “to understand, to sympathize, to empathize and to reassure,” he says his job “is not to be emotional and/or cry with his patients for two reasons: It is not therapeutic for the patient, and it will cause “emotional burnout”. (although I’m not sure about the latter)

Personally I prefer a doctor with great knowledge, but openminded to other ideas, attentive and empathic, but without loosing a certain distance, a good listener, explaining disease and treatment options, ….. but no crying, please, never! Never when I’m around. Not when I’m the patient.

****************************************************

NL flagToevallig kwam ik in mijn Feed-Reader een bericht tegen uit de New York Times van 22 april, dat perfect aansluit op mijn vorige post over Etiquette Based Medicine: At Bedside, Stay Stoic or Display Emotions? [*registratie vereist].

Dit stuk bespreekt de voor en tegens van een dokter die zich “laat gaan”.

Enkele citaten:

A young doctor sat down with a terminal lung cancer patient and her husband to discuss the woman’s gloomy prognosis. The patient began to cry. Then the doctor did, too.

At a recent meeting of the Society of General Internal Medicine, Dr. Anthony D. Sung of Harvard Medical School and colleagues reported that 69 percent of medical students and 74 percent of interns said they had cried at least once.

In the 1988 PBS documentary “Can We Make a Better Doctor?” a Harvard medical student, Jane Liebschutz, sees her patient unexpectedly die during a cardiac bypass operation. She suddenly bursts into tears and wanders away from her colleagues until the chief surgeon, who has witnessed what happened, assures her that her response was natural.

Dr. Benita Burke, skipped lunch to spend extra time with her cancer patients. They dubbed this time “mental health rounds,” during which they could address issues that were not strictly medical. Many times, Dr. Burke would wind up in tears or giving an embrace.

Behalve dit stuk zijn ook de commentaren in de NY-times zelf en op 2 blogs (DB’s Medical Rants en Clinical Cases and Images) de moeite van het lezen waard. Diverse meningen passeren de revue, zowel die van dokters als patiënten of familie. Hieruit blijkt dat er niet één waarheid is. Of het uiten van heel sterke emoties kàn, hangt erg af van de dokter, de patient, hun relatie en de situatie. De meeste patienten vinden het uiten van emoties wél belangrijk (“een dokter moet geen robot zijn”), maar velen vinden te sterke emoties zoals het in huilen uitbarsten waar de patient bijstaat niet prettig, omdat ze juist willen dat ze op hun arts kunnen steunen. Gaat het om een heel slechte boodschap (kanker bijvoorbeeld) dan kan de patient het ook ervaren dat hij opgegeven is: de arts neemt alle hoop dan in een keer weg. Maar als een co-assistent bij het overlijden van zijn/haar “eerste” patient bij haar vrienden uithuilt kan iedereen dat begrijpen. Als een dokter huilt wanneer hij slecht nieuws brengt over een dierbare ten gevolge van een medische fout, dan kan dat bij de verwerking helpen.

Maar welke dokter zou jij verkiezen?

Ik ben het in grote lijnen met Dr Hiram Cody eens. In de NY Times waarschuwt hij tegen overmatige emoties. Hij benadrukt weliswaar dat artsen begripvol moeten zijn, moeten meeleven, empathisch moeten zijn en gerust moeten stellen, maar echt emotioneel zijn en huilen raadt hij af omdat het noch de patient noch de arts goed doet.

Persoonlijk verkies ik een arts met een goede kennis van zaken, maar die wel openstaat voor andere opvattingen, die meeleeft en empathisch is wanneer nodig. Hij moet goed kunnen luisteren, mij serieus nemen, goed kunnen uitleggen waarom ik iets heb en welke behandelingsmogelijkheden er zijn (met hun voor-en nadelen). Hij moet eerlijk zijn en als ik het nodig zou hebben is een beetje emotie en een beetje warmte prettig. Maar huilen, nee. Geen huilen waar ik bij ben. Niet wanneer ik de patient ben.

About these ads

Actions

Information

2 responses

14 05 2008
jonathan

that will show as a sympathy to the patient..

16 05 2008
Possibly an announcement about possibly related posts « Laika’s MedLibLog

[...] C. appropriate-bedside-manners (Dutch/English) [...]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s




Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 611 other followers

%d bloggers like this: