Twitter as a modern tam-tam

26 07 2008

I´ve just discovered Twitter, a free social networking/microblogging service. As described in a previous post I prefer Twitter to Hyves: it’s globally oriented, more interactive and there are more collegues out there.

Via Twitter you can share ideas and thoughts with people with the same kind of interest (followers/-ing). People tell what they’re doing, give links to interesting information. Sometimes Twitter serves like an Q&A. It is only difficult to condense the message to 140 characters -and still be understood. Here is an example:

Laika (Jacqueline) laikas Does anyone know the code(s) in PubMed for : ‘has been indexed’ and ‘has not been indexed’. There are so many papers unindexed >1 yr old.

Nikki D.eagledawg @laikas Not all citations will have MeSH [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE], details on why (scope,author manuscripts) at http://snurl.com/34lyf

Laika (Jacqueline)laikas @eagledawg Thnx. PubMedCentral® manuscripts may be the main culprit in this set.

Nikki D.eagledawg @laikas yep that will do it too! Hard to explain anything about NLM resources in only 140 characters ;)

Apart from being a social platform, Twitter can also function as a news breaking platform. In case of the China earthquakes, for instance, Twitter brought faster coverage than traditional media. (i.e. see this blog about technology from BBC News)

A Dutch example: the news that Joran van der Sloot (possibly involved in Natalee Holloway’s disappearance) threw a glass of red wine in the face of private detective Peter R. de Vries after a TV broadcast first appeared on Twitter. Corrie Gerritsma saw it all happen in the studio, twittered it, which was picked up by Fransisco van Jole, a journalist, specialized in Internet coverage (see his post here). While the official media were asleep, Francisco made it public on Twitter. Later a video showing the incident appeared on You Tube. I learned these facts from yet another twit: dutchcowboys. Thus Twitter is really working as a tam-tam here. Dutchcowboys notes that although the group twitterati is small they’re moving closer and closer to the fire.

Quite coincidentally I picked up two very different news stories simultaneously through Twitter yesterday morning while at work.

One was about the Bomb blasts in Bangalore, brought to us via Twitter by @mukund and @narain (via @pfanderson). They covered in detail what happened, before the official news releases.

Mukund twittered:

6 minutes ago: Bomb Blasts in Bangalore – 4 locations, details to follow #Bloreblast
4 minutes ago: Blasts at: Sirjapur Road, Nayandhalli, Madiwala , Adugodi, Rajaram and Mohan Rai Circle
1 minute ago: Bangalore blasts – telecom connectivity is broken so trying to call bangalore wont work

And finally blogged about it (see post here). The usefulness of Twitter to follow the events was stressed by Daniel Bennett at his post: using Twitter to follow the bangalore bomb blasts (click here). Daniel is a PhD student researching the impact of blogging and new media on the BBC’s coverage of war and terrorism.

twitter news

Although the news is not verified and authorized, it is fast, and that may be important, especially for local news (also to reassure people: ‘no death’). Other examples and thoughts about Twitter’s relevance as a news source see the comments to the post on ‘BBC news technology’ I referred to before.

The other event I was alerted to at the very same moment was local news from the ‘University of Leicester (UoL) Library (UK), where the falling down of a part of the heavy wooden ceiling in the new library caused a little disaster (luckily without any casualties), resulting in a temporary closing. Interestingly, Leicester Twitter-users were well aware of the event before it was common knowledge, and colleagues were informing each other via Twitter. The question then asked, both at the blog of the Leicester Library and on 2 video’s by @AJCann (one below): how should we respond to such unofficial events (possibly much worse events at a crowded campus)? And which role social media have to play in such a context?


more about “Vodpod Firefox Extension for WordPress”, posted with vodpod

http://api.seesmic.com/#/video/iae6d6VuZW/watch

In a second video (made that same day) AJCann stressed that:

“everything with a service function should have a service dashboard especially in case of services outages, like Twitter.com and wordpress.com have.
Where is your university organization service dashboard? How does your organization inform about the status of your institution, library, blog, lecture, module, whatever?”
(freely cited)

On his video he referred to the url http://tinyurl.com/6h42hs: the announcement on “Movius Interactive Corporation Announces Rapid Alert Application” on O’Reilly Radar.

Certainly, also a service like PubMed should be in dashboard to notify their customers of outages. As Michelle Kraft recently ranted at her blog (see her post here):

Apparently PubMed’s servers went down at 1:00am that morning… As usual the emails started coming in from Medlib-l regarding PubMed. Librarians from different areas of the United States asking about the health status of PubMed as they too noticed it doing funky things. There was a brief discussion and some questions raised on Twitter Medlibs about what to do if PubMed goes down and you don’t have access to Ovid. What do you do, where do you send patrons? Would third party tools work?

Thus again the unofficial tam-tam did its job, but wouldn’t it be far better if PubMed itself “put an obvious note on the site when there is an outage or if there are problems”?

Indeed Web 2.0 communication is an undeveloped area. There are plenty possibilities, not only for individuals, but also for libraries, hospitals, universities and organizations.
But how to convince the majority of people that think those tools/sites are just trendy?!

Note added ‘in proof’: while I was working on this post, @mukund was twittering about new blasts in Ahmedabad.

———————–

NL flag NL vlag

Ik ken de gratis netwerk/microblogging dienst Twitter eigenlijk nog maar kort, maar ben er nu al enthousiast over. Zoals ik eerder schreef verkies ik Twitter boven zo’n site als Hyves, dat meer een profielensite is, minder interactief èn Nederlandstalig. Met Twitter bereik je veel meer mensen, ook (en in mijn geval vooral) veel collega’s.

Via Twitter kun je ideeen en gedachten met geestverwanten (followers/-ing) delen. Mensen vertellen wat ze aan het doen zijn, of geven links naar interessante informatie. Soms is Twitter net een vraagbaak (Q&A). Alleen is het soms een hele kunst om je boodschap helder over te brengen in 140 tekens, zoals wel blijkt uit de volgende, overigens zeer nuttige, conversatie:

Laika (Jacqueline) laikas Does anyone know the code(s) in PubMed for : ‘has been indexed’ and ‘has not been indexed’. There are so many papers unindexed >1 yr old.

Nikki D.eagledawg @laikas Not all citations will have MeSH [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE], details on why (scope,author manuscripts) at http://snurl.com/34lyf

Laika (Jacqueline)laikas @eagledawg Thnx. PubMedCentral® manuscripts may be the main culprit in this set.

Nikki D.eagledawg @laikas yep that will do it too! Hard to explain anything about NLM resources in only 140 characters ;)

Twitter is echter niet alleen een sociaal medium, maar zorgde meerdere malen voor een primeur, zoals bijvoorbeeld over de aardbevingen in China. Twitter bracht het nieuws sneller dan de traditionele media (zie bijvoorbeeld dit blog over technologie van BBC News)

Om dichter bij huis te blijven: het ‘nieuws’ dat Joran van der Sloot (die mogelijk betrokken is bij de verdwijning van Natalee Holloway) na een tv-uitzending een glas rode wijn in het gezicht van Peter R. de Vries had gegooid, werd het eerst bekendgemaakt via Twitter. Corrie Gerritsma zag het incident, plaatste een bericht op Twitter, dat opgepakt werd door de journalist Fransisco van Jole (zie bericht). Terwijl de Telegraaf ‘sliep’, bracht Francisco deze primeur naar buiten via Twitter en later via zijn blog. Daarna verscheen er ook nog een You-tube video van het hele gebeuren. Op mijn beurt las ik dit alles weer op een twit van de dutchcowboys. Dus Twitter werkt soms echt als een tam-tam. Dutchcowboys merkt ook op:

“Twitter lijkt ondanks de nog relatief kleine groep van gebruikers steeds dichter op de actualiteit te kruipen“.

Heel toevallig kwamen gisteren via Twitter 2 heel verschillende nieuwsberichten voorbij.

Een ging over bomaanslagen in Bangalore, via de Twitterati @mukund and @narain wereldkundig gemaakt (getipt door @pfanderson). Vòòrdat de officiele kanalen het raporteerden.

Minuut na minuut twitterde Mukund:

Bomb Blasts in Bangalore – 4 locations, details to follow #Bloreblast
Blasts at: Sirjapur Road, Nayandhalli, Madiwala , Adugodi, Rajaram and Mohan Rai Circle
Bangalore blasts – telecom connectivity is broken so trying to call bangalore wont work

Vervolgens vond hij ook nog tijd om erover te bloggen (zie hier). Het belang van Twitter in dit opzicht werd uit de doeken gedaan door Daniel Bennett: using Twitter to follow the bangalore bomb blasts (zie hier). Als promovendus onderzoekt Daniel de effecten van web 2.0 media op de oorlogsverslaggeving door de BBC.

Hoewel niet officieel en niet geverifieerd, is het nieuws er wel heel snel. Met name bij locaal nieuws kan dat van belang zijn, niet alleen om mensen te waarschuwen, maar ook om ze gerust te stellen (‘geen doden‘). Zie voor enkele andere voorbeelden van het belang van Twitter als nieuwsbron, de commentaren op het BBC news technologie-blogbericht.

Vrijwel tegelijkertijd speelde zich een klein drama in de ‘University of Leicester (UoL)’ Bibliotheek af: een deel van het zware plafond van het net nieuwe gebouw was naar beneden gevallen. Gelukkig was dit vòòr openingstijd gebeurd en waren er geen slachtoffers, maar de bibliotheek werd wel tot nader order gesloten. Werknemers met een twitter-account hoorden het nieuws het eerst. Continu stelden ze elkaar op de hoogte via Twitter, ook toen er rond het middaguur weer groen licht gegeven werd.
De twitteraar @AJCann stelde zich toen de vraag hoe we op dergelijke onofficiele berichten horen te reageren en welke rol de sociale media in deze context moeten spelen. Zie de discussie op het blog van de U0L Bibliotheek. Ook maakte hij diezelfde dag nog 2 video’s, waaronder bovenstaande video.

In een 2e video benadrukte AJCann:

“everything with a service function should have a service dashboard like Twitter.com and wordpress.com have, especially in case of services outages,
Where is your university organization service dashboard? How does your organization inform about the status of your institution, library, blog, lecture, module, whatever?”
(vrij ‘vertaald’)’

Op de video is steeds de url http://tinyurl.com/6h42hs: in beeld een verwijzing naar een bericht op O’Reilly Radar over de noodzaak van een snel waarschuwingssysteem.

Zo’n waarschuwingsysteem zou ook een dienst als PubMed niet misstaan om de gebruikers te waarschuwen als ze weer eens ‘down’ zijn, of hun servers overbelast. Ik moest hieraan denken, omdat Michelle Kraft het kortgeleden hierover had (zie hier voor haar blogbericht):

Apparently PubMed’s servers went down at 1:00am that morning… As usual the emails started coming in from Medlib-l regarding PubMed. Librarians from different areas of the United States asking about the health status of PubMed as they too noticed it doing funky things. There was a brief discussion and some questions raised on Twitter Medlibs about what to do if PubMed goes down and you don’t have access to Ovid. What do you do, where do you send patrons? Would third party tools work?

Dus wederom is het zo dat de onofficiele tamtam zijn werk deed (voor diegenen die het volgden), maar het zou toch veel beter zijn als PubMed problemen zelf officieel aankondigde.

Web 2.0 communication is een nog onontgonnen gebied. Het biedt heel veel mogelijkheden, niet alleen voor individuen, maar ook voor bibliotheken, universiteiten, ziekenhuizen, organisaties.
Maar dan is het wel nodig dat de grote meerderheid die denkt dat het allemaal maar niets is of veel te trendy over de streep getrokken wordt… net als ik, een paar maanden geleden.

About these ads

Actions

Information

4 responses

2 08 2008
Randy Pausch Last Lecture: Achieving Your Childhood Dreams « Laika’s MedLibLog

[...] Randy Pausch Last Lecture: Achieving Your Childhood Dreams 26 07 2008 The other day I wrote about Twitter as an alternative and sometimes breaking news source. [...]

7 08 2008
Twitter Traumas: Twitter’s Janus Face « Laika’s MedLibLog

[...] service, for its value as a rich source of social contacts, news and ideas. See for instance this post about Twitter as a modern tamtam or this one titled: “Forget Hyves go [...]

18 01 2009
Reference Management Software, Shut Down of 5 Google Apps and a Plane that Crashed. « Laika’s MedLibLog

[...] picture which was posted on Twitter from an iPhone, taken by Janis Krums from a ferry. Earlier (Twitter as a modern tam tam) I gave some other examples of Twitter as a breaking news [...]

13 09 2011
studietips

Zeer interessant artikel, heb deze pagina opgeslagen in mijn favorieten! :-) Gr studietips

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s




Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 610 other followers

%d bloggers like this: