Empathy

13 12 2009

The next Grand Rounds will be hosted by Barbara Olson of Florence dot com. The theme will be Simplify, identical to the theme of the annual conference of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement in Orlando. We are invited to share what’s on our mind about any healthcare-related topic indicating with one word why it is important.

My word is Empathy, because it is a versatile,  important skill doctors should have (besides knowledge and technical expertise to name a few other important skills). Empathy is especially important with vulnerable patients, the old and very young.

It strikes me that pediatricians are often very kind and pleasant doctors. They know how to ‘handle’ kids. GP’s also have to deal with kids a lot, but they’re often less patient and kind. At least that applies to our GP. I have had various issues with him, although never outspoken. He is a good doctor, but can be rude at times.

This is a funny story.

Once upon a time, we had to regularly visit our doctor, because my daughter, then 4 to 5 years old, had all kinds of small complaints.

Once she had (innocent) warts. He had to scrape them, but because my daughter found this painful, we had to pretreat the warts with EMLA plasters that numb the skin. I had to do that at home, but the plaster at the inner side of her knee had loosened after a half our walk to the doctor’s practice. He grumbled that I didn’t do it right and that I had to come back another time, meanwhile hard-handedly removing the other warts, forgetting half of them. My daughter didn’t enjoy the scrapings, the corners of her mouth trembling in her attempts not to cry.

After most of the warts had been removed, the doctor took a big flat box with all kinds of little presents, he obviously gave to children at the end of the ordeal.

“Here. You can choose a present!”

My daughter looked at all the minute presents, pondering which one to choose.

There were a lot of rings, with blue stones, red stones, pink stones. There were necklaces, little toys, games….

“Choose one”.

She choose a ring with a pink stone. But wait, that blue ring was nicer and she returned the ring with the pink stone .

But the little patience my doctor had was at an end.

He grabbed something from the box and put it into my daughter’s hand: “Here!”

It was a simple round cardboard with the most silly sheep drawing I have ever seen. With open mound my daughter received the present. Speechless she stared at the gift.

The doctor gestured we could leave the room. He apparently met his obligations with the gift.

With the door handle in my hand, I saw my daughter making a sudden turn. She took one last look at the sheep to throw it as an experienced pitcher straight at the doctor’s desk.

We heard a loud “Well, I never!”, when we left the room.

Added 2009-12-15:

Summary by Barbara at Florence.dot.com:

Jacqueline at Laika’s MedLibLog captures the arachnoid spirit, giving her post a one word title: empathy. The post shows how much we long for care that considers more about who we are than our “chief complaint” often reveals. If Jacqueline had been in the mood to spin longer, she could have called this post, “What comes around, goes around!”
Hit the nail on the head, Barbara!

Photo Credits:

“You are a lamb”, adapted from: http://www.flickr.com/photos/onegoodbumblebee/ / CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

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14 12 2009
uberVU - social comments

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This post was mentioned on Twitter by laikas: Blogging: Empathy http://bit.ly/5Y458j

30 05 2010
Stories [7]: A Strange Doctor « Laika's MedLibLog

[...] have been thinking and thinking, but I failed to come up with a funny story other than I have told before (and one I have to check with my mom). Most of my experiences in the medicine/health field [...]

23 08 2010
Stories [8] How Not to Reassure (or Treat) a Patient « Laika's MedLibLog

[...] GP (the leading character in this story; he resembles a bull in a china shop, sometimes, but other than that, he is [...]

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