Stories [8] How Not to Reassure (or Treat) a Patient

23 08 2010

The host of the next edition of the Grand Rounds is Fizzziatrist at A Cartoon Guide to Becoming a Doctor. Thus it is no surprise that the theme of this edition is “Humor in Medicine”. The Fizzziatrist:

When I host Grand Rounds, I will post the links in order of how many times each one made me go “ha!” (…) It’s all quite scientific.

Well that’s a tough job. First both as a medical librarian and  a patient, I’m not in the situation to experience a lot of the humorous aspects of a doctors job. Furthermore I’m not the HA-HA-HA LOL-REAL SCREAM type. I’m more of the smile and the grin.

So what to do? I hope you find the following enjoyable. And perhaps many little ha’s do make one big HA.

——————–

How not to reassure (or treat) your patients (own experience)

My GP (the leading character in this story; he resembles a bull in a china shop, sometimes, but other than that, he is o.k.)

  • At one of my first visits he was trying to (manually) find the card of my husband. 
    When he thought he found it, he muttered:
    “that old guy?”
    Apparently he had mistaken my father (I still had my maiden name) for my partner.
    Lucky (both for me and my gp)  he was wrong. But how embarrassing if he
    had been right.

    wikipedia (CC)

  • Once I phoned him for I don’t know what and he said:
    “I’m not seeing  you often”
    “Why, is that bad?”
    “Well, it is exceptional”
    “Exceptional?”
    “Yes, I see women of your age regularly”

    “For what kind of disease, if I may ask”.
    “Well, the flu .. and for pill or IUD-controls”
    [sneering] “Sure, but I’m never seriously ill and I have a gynecologist for the latter”.
  • When I was pregnant of my second child, I phoned him for a prescription for anti-Rh antibodies, which I needed for prenatal testing. Since I hadn’t visited my gynecologist after my first child, and the hospital nurses had assured me that gp’s and midwives normally prescribed, this should not be a problem.
    I began: “I’m a few weeks pregnant and ….”
    He interrupted me, confused: “but that..….. but ….. you were pregnant a few months ago“.
    He was half right. I had had a miscarriage then. (Dang! A heavy blow)
    After a curt explanation, I hung up.
  • Later he phoned me back (with a thin excuse) and I asked him for the anti-Rh antibodies, but he just didn’t get it.
    Ask your  midwife”.
    “But I don’t have a midwife”
    “Everyone has got a midwife, nowadays”
    “No, I got a gynecologist”
    “Then  ask your gynecologist”
    “But  I’m not his patient anymore”
    “Then ask him to be your doctor again”
    “But I need the prescription right now“.

    I tried to convince him in vain. He finally mumbled something like: That is of my beat, I don’t do pregnancies and deliveries anymore.
    [luckily one phone call to the gynecologists' wife was enough to get the prescription. She passed the message immediately, and said that if I liked him to take care of me again, it was best to make an appointment soon after the test.]
  • My gp had the same attitude another time.  I had signs of a Addison crisis. I tried to explain to him what might be wrong. He asked one or two things, shrugged and then said: “You better make an appointment with your specialists. This disease is beyond my practice.”
    At the time it seemed ok to me, but my endocrinologist said it was irresponsible: “Suppose he wouldn’t immediately refer someone with an acute crisis: that could be fatal. [I was hospitalized in this case, but it was not that urgent] See also “the Doctor and the Patient”
The Doctor, by Sir Luke Fildes (1891)

Image via Wikipedia

My gynecologist/obstetrician [a friend of mine recommended him, because he was kind and puts you at ease. It really is a wonderful doctor, and after all those deliveries he still considered birth a miracle. However, his way of reassuring was not always effective]. 

  • March 31, late afternoon: “It is time to get your baby ( 2,5 weeks post-term), but we better postpone it for two days. It is not such a nice day to celebrate the child’s birthday, don’t you think” (meaning April Fools day)
  • When I had my first check-up he warmed the speculum, trying to break the ice with some humor: “they do warm the cutlery for each course at the Chinese”, don’t they?
    (I found it rather tasteless, but remained silent: he meant it well)
  • When we discussed where I would deliver, he said that that would be in his hospital. I sighed with relief. As any new mother I was nervous about it.
    But he didn’t want me to have false expectations:
    Of course I hope I can personally deliver your baby. However, the chances are real that someone else will be around at that time. But believe me, if the moment is there, you don’t care who stands at the foot of your bed. Even if it is a gorilla..”

My Dentist (the best, most skillful, pleasant dentist there is, but still ….  a dentist)

  • Once, just finished drilling, she said carefully: “Don’t be scared when you look into the mirror….. I just touched your tongue”.

This concludes my experiences.  If you would like to read more serious stuff about “how (not) to reassure”, then you can read this old article The Art Of Reassurance (PDF) or this recent blog post at « HealthSkills WeblogIs reassurance reassuring?

One main advise (from the latter blog):

Never reassure a patient about something they are not already worried about. It would be a mistake, for example, to earnestly reassure patients that they do not have cancer when the thought had never entered their minds!”

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5 responses

23 08 2010
Tweets that mention Stories [8] How Not to Reassure (or Treat) a Patient « Laika's MedLibLog -- Topsy.com

[...] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Laika (Jacqueline), Laika (Jacqueline). Laika (Jacqueline) said: Blogging: Stories [8] How Not to Reassure (or Treat) a Patient: The host of the next edition of the Grand Rounds i… http://bit.ly/atV234 [...]

25 08 2010
adiemusfree

Hi Laika
Thanks for mentioning my post on reassurance – I laughed at the April Fool’s Day comment!

26 08 2010
Twitted by rowankrieger

[...] This post was Twitted by rowankrieger [...]

20 09 2010
Stories [9]: A Healthy Volunteer « Laika's MedLibLog

[...] Stories [8] How Not to Reassure (or Treat) a Patient (laikaspoetnik.wordpress.com) [...]

14 09 2011
Benton

Hi there! Don’t you use Myspace? I’d wish to follow you if that might be ok. I sure am undoubtedly taking pleasure in your web site and expect new posts.

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