Silly Sunday [33] Science, Journalists & Reporting

12 09 2010

I Friday I read a post of David Bradley at Sciscoop Science on six reasons why scientist should talk to reporters, which was based on an article in this week’s The Scientist magazine by Edyta Zielinska (registration required).

The main reasons why scientist should talk to reporters:

  • It’s your duty
  • It raises your profile with journal editors and funders
  • Your bosses will love it
  • You may pick up grant-writing tips
  • It gets the public excited about science
  • It’s better you than someone else

But the most strong part of the Zielinska article are the practical tips, which fall into 3 categories:

  • the medium matters (i.e. tv versus print)
  • getting the most out of a press call (KISS, significance metaphors)
  • Common press pitfalls, and how to avoid them (avoid oversimplification, errors, jargon, misquotes, sensational stories)

The article is concluded by a useful glossary. Read more: Why Trust A Reporter? – The Scientist

Alan Dangour has experienced what may happen when you report scientific evidence which is then covered by the news.

He and his group published systematic reviews that found no evidence of any important differences in the nutritional composition of foodstuffs grown using conventional and organic farming methods. There was also no evidence of nutrition-related health benefits from consuming organically produced foods.

The press quickly picked up on the story. The Times ran a front-page headline: “Organic food ‘has no extra health benefits’ ”, the Daily Express added “Official” while, in a wonderfully nuanced piece, the Daily Mail ran: “A cancerous conspiracy to poison your faith in organic food”.

Initially it was “tremendously exciting and flattering, but their findings were contrary to beliefs held by many and soon the hate-mails started flooding in. That’s why he concludes: “Come on scientists, stand up and fight!” when not the scientific evidence is called into question, but also your scientific skills, and  personal and professional integrity. Quite appropriately a Lancet editorial put it like this: “Eat the emotion but question the evidence”.

Journalists can also be target of hate mail or aggressive comments. In the whole XMRV-CFS torrent, patients seem to almost “adore” positive journalists (i.e. Amy Dockser Marcus of the WSJ Health Blog), while harassing those who are a bit more critical, like @elmarveerman of Noorderlicht author of “tiring viruses“). It has caused another journalist (who wrote about the same topic) to stop because people hurled curses at her. A good discussion is fine, but unfounded criticism is not, she reasoned.

Last  week, 2 other articles emphasized the need for science journalism to change.

One article by Matthew Nisbet at  Big Think elaborated on an idea on what Alice Bell calls “upstream science journalism.” Her blog post is based on her talk at Science Online London as part of a plenary panel with David Dobbs, Martin Robbins and Ed Yong on “Rebooting” (aka the future of) science journalism (video -of bad quality- included).

Upstream, we have the early stages of communication about some area of science: meetings, literature reviews or general lab gossip. Gradually these ideas are worked through, and the communicative output flows downstream towards the peer-reviewed and published journal article and perhaps, via a press release and maybe even a press conference, some mass media reporting.

This still is pretty vague to me. I think less pushed press releases copied by each and every news source and more background stories, giving insight in how science comes about and what it represents would be welcomed. As long as it isn’t too much like glorification of certain personalities. (More) gossip is also not what we’re waiting for.

Her examples and the interesting discussion that follows clarify that she thinks more of blogs and twitter as tools propelling upstream science journalism.

One main objection (or rather limitation) is that: “most science journalists/writers cover whatever they find interesting and what they believe their readers will find interesting (Ian Sample in comments).”

David ropeik

Wonderful goal, to have journalism serve society in this, or any way, but, forgive me, it’s a naive hope, common among those who observe journalism but haven’t done it.(…..)
Even those of us who feel journalism is a calling and serves an important civic role do not see ourselves principally as teachers or civil servants working in the name of some higher social cause, to educate the public about stuff we thought they should know. We want the lead story. We want our work to get attention. We want to have impact, sure, hopefully positive. But we don’t come into work everyday asking “what should the public know about?”

That’s reality. John Fleck (journalist) agrees that the need to “get a lot of attention” is a driving force in newsroom culture and decision-making, but stresses that the newspapers he worked for have always devoted a portion of their resources to things managers felt were important even if not attention-getting.

So truth in the middle?

Another blogpost -at Jay Rosen: Public Notebook gives advice to journalist “formerly known as the media”. Apart from advice as “you need to be blogging and you need to “get” mobile he want the next generation journalists to understand:

  1. Replace readers, viewers, listeners and consumers with the term “users.”
  2. Remember: the users know more than you do.
  3. There’s been a power shift; the mutualization of journalism is here. We bring important things to the table, and so do the users. Therefore we include them. “Seeing people as a public” means that.
  4. Describe the world in a way that helps people participate in it.  When people participate, they seek out information.
  5. Anyone can doesn’t mean everyone will. (…) It’s an emerging rule of thumb that suggests that if you get a group of 100 people online then one will create content, 10 will ‘interact’ with it (commenting or offering improvements) and the other 89 will just view it… So what’s the conclusion? Only that you shouldn’t expect too much online.
  6. The journalist is just a heightened case of an informed citizen, not a special class.
  7. Your authority starts with, “I’m there, you’re not, let me tell you about it.”
  8. Somehow, you need to listen to demand and give people what they have no way to demand (…) because they don’t know about it yet
  9. In your bid to be trusted, don’t take the View From Nowhere; instead, tell people where you’re coming from.
  10. Breathe deeply of what DeTocqueville said: “Newspapers make associations and associations make newspapers.”

I think those are useful and practical tips, some of which fit in with the idea of more upstream journalism.

O.k. that’s enough for now. We have been pretty serious on the topic. But it is a Friday Fun/ Silly Sunday post. So bring in the comics.

These are self-explanatory, aren’t they?

(HT: David Bradley and commenter on Facebook. Can’t find it anymore. Facebook is hard to search)

From SMBC comics: http://www.smbc-comics.com/index.php?db=comics&id=1623

Come on scientists, stand up and fight! From where I’m sitting it looks as if we are under attack from those who not only want to question the importance of scientific evidence but also to cast doubt on our scientific skills, and our personal and professional integrity. In the year of the 350th anniversary of the Royal Society we must defend the importance of scientific evidence and stand up for science.

I’m quite lucky. My research is just about interesting enough to discuss at dinner. It helps that I’m a public health nutritionist and, at least at dinner, my friends are generally happy to talk about food and sometimes even health. I work on projects including nutritional and physical activity interventions designed to maintain health and function in later life and the impact our love affair with animal foods has on both the environment and public health. Dressed up, and with a light touch of spin, these are all possible dinner party conversations.

My first brush with an audience outside the narrow circles of academia came soon after completing my PhD on the growth of the legs of Amerindian children (the things you used to be able to get funding for!). It turns out that leg length is a sensitive marker of diet and health in early childhood. Later work in England showed that the legs of English boys and girls are now longer than they were 20 years ago, probably because of improved diet and environmental conditions. The great British press loved this story. Lots of photos of long-legged women adorned the newspapers and one national paper even ran a competition to find Britain’s longest legs! This was a good story — easy to understand, straightforward to report and not challenging any pre-existing beliefs.

However, I have recently had a different experience of what can happen when you report scientific evidence. Last year, a team of us from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine released two systematic reviews on the nutritional quality and nutrition-related health benefits of organically produced foods. The research had been commissioned by the Food Standards Agency and had taken more than a year to complete.

We were not the first people to ask whether there were any differences in nutritional composition or health benefits of foods produced under different production regimens but it became clear that no one had addressed the question systematically. Systematic reviews are an important tool for scientists; unlike ordinary reviews, they are seen as original research and help to provide clarity in areas of uncertainty. The basic underpinning of a systematic review is that the process of conducting the review is pre-specified and that the review itself is as comprehensive as possible within these pre-specified limits. Reviews that are not systematic are much more prone to bias, especially with regards to the selection of papers included for review.

Our systematic reviews found that there was no evidence of any important differences in the nutritional composition of foodstuffs grown using conventional and organic farming methods. There was also no evidence of nutrition-related health benefits from consuming organically produced foods.

The press quickly picked up on the story. The Times ran a front-page headline: “Organic food ‘has no extra health benefits’ ”, the Daily Express added “Official” while, in a wonderfully nuanced piece, the Daily Mail ran: “A cancerous conspiracy to poison your faith in organic food”.

This was initially a tremendously exciting and unprecedented period in my academic career. My ego was certainly flattered! However, the tide of emotion quickly started to turn sour. I became increasingly dismayed at the way in which our data were being used and distorted, especially by those who would benefit from the return of uncertainty to the argument. I was also frustrated that we were being criticised for not including other aspects of organic farming (use of pesticides etc) in our review.

With correspondents only a click away, it will not be surprising to learn that we also received many hundreds of e-mails (it would be very interesting to know what proportion of these correspondents had actually read our reports). My favourite e-mail came from a physician in the US who complained that his wife had “been wasting money for years on organic food” and that at last our “scientific review may finally bring her to her senses”.

Other correspondents were less polite and we received many angry, even vicious e-mails questioning the integrity, independence and ability of the team. These are essential ingredients for a good research team and it is fair to ask these questions but the ferocity of the attack suggested that, by questioning the scientific evidence on the nutrient content of organic food, we had actually questioned something bigger. For the first time, we had drawn into sharp focus the strength of the evidence supporting the widespread belief that organic food is “better” — and many people did not like what they saw. As a Lancet editorial put it: “Eat the emotion but question the evidence”.

Beliefs are important, but so is science and standing up for scientific evidence is crucial. We should not be afraid to report our findings publicly, whether they are merely of academic interest or of a controversial nature. This is our job as scientists.

I expected our reviews to be read with interest but I’m not sure that I fully realised how far I was putting my head above the parapet. I think I’ve passed through the toughest hours and have emerged stronger and better able to fight for the importance of science in modern life.

Returning to the dinner party theme, I have also learnt the — at times painful ­— consequences of telling women that “based on current scientific evidence” their legs are slightly shorter than would be expected for their height. There’s a time and a place for everything.

Alan Dangour is a senior lecturer at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

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18 09 2010
Friday Foolery [34] How to start a movement « Laika's MedLibLog

[...] Silly Sunday [33] Science, Journalists & Reporting (laikaspoetnik.wordpress.com) [...]

1 10 2010
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[...] Silly Sunday [33] Science, Journalists & Reporting (laikaspoetnik.wordpress.com) [...]

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[...] Silly Sunday [33] Science, Journalists & Reporting (laikaspoetnik.wordpress.com) [...]

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