3rd Call for Submissions for “Medical Information Matters”: Tools for Searching the Biomedical Literature

8 05 2011

It takes some doing to breathe life into Medical Information Matters” (blog carnival about medical  information).
A month ago I wrote a 2nd call for submissions post for this blog carnival. Unfortunately the next host, Martin Fenner, didn’t have time to finish a blog post and has come up with a new (interesting) variation on the theme “A Wish list for better medical information”.

Martin asks you to philosophize, blog and/or comment about “Tools for Searching the Biomedical Literature.

You can base your contribution on a recent (editable) survey of 28 different PubMed derivative tools by Zhiyong Lu (NCBI) [1].

Thus, write your thoughts on the various PubMed derivative tools mentioned here or write about your own favorite 3rd party PubMed tool (included or not).

For details, see Martin’s blog post announcing this upcoming edition. The Blog Carnival FAQs are here.

And if you don’t have time to write about this topic, you may still find the survey useful, as well as the views of others on this topic. So check out Martin’s blog Gobbledygook once in a while to see if the blog edition has been posted.

Note [1]: If you have already submitted a post to the carnival, or would like to write about another theme, we will take care that your post (if relevant)  will be included in this or the next edition. You can always submit here.

Note [2]: Would you like to host “Medical Information Matters” at your blog? Please comment here or write to: laika dot spoetnik at gmail dot com. We need hosts for June, July, August and September (submission deadline first Saturday of every month, posting on the next Tuesday)

  1. Lu Z. PubMed and beyond: a survey of web tools for searching biomedical literature. Database. 2011 Jan;2011. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/database/baq036




Medical Information Matters: 2nd Call For Submissions

1 04 2011

You may have noticed that my blog was barely updated between November and February. Lets say I had the winter blues.

As a consequence, the Blog Carnival “Medical Information Matters” hibernated as well. Unintended… But as a host you need to actively engage in blog carnivals. Else few people will submit.

This is the reason that Martin Fenner at Gobblydook didn’t post “his edition”, but luckily he is willing to give it another try.

Here was his call for submissions (in December). I have adapted it a little to make it “up to date”.

In December April I am hosting the blog carnival Medical Information Matters, a blog carnival about – medical information. The deadline for submissions is next Tuesday this weekend, and I have already received a number of interesting posts. As Christmas is right around the corner, I thought that a good theme for the carnival would be a wish list for better medical information. This could mean many different things, e.g. a database that covers a specific area, better access to fulltext papers or clinical trial results, etc. Please submit your posts here.

So, if you have written (or are able to write) a post which fits in with this topic – or fits in with the broader theme of “medical information” or “medical library matters”, please submit the URL (permalink) of your post HERE at the Blog Carnival.

You may also submit a post of someone else. Tips are also appreciated.

See the archive for more information.

For more ideas about what to submit, here is the previous edition at Dean Giustini’s “The Search Principle blog”Medical Blogging Matters: A Carnival of Ideas, November 2010

And, no this is not a April fools day joke….





Medical Information Matters 2.10 is up at The Search Principle Blog

16 11 2010

In case you missed it: the new edition of Medical Information Matters (edition 2.10) – formerly MedLibs Round is up at the well-known blog “Search Principles” of the equally well-known Dean Giustini, a knowledgeable, helpful and friendly Canadian medical librarian, one of the first bloggers, a web 2.0 pioneer, author of many papers (like this one in the BMJ), main contributor to the UBC Health Library Wiki, educator and expert in EBM. Need I say more?

With a wink to the name of the blog carnival, Dean gave his post the title: Medical Blogging Matters: A Carnival of Ideas, November 2010

And indeed, his post is a real ode to medical bloggers and medical blogging

Dean:

With the rise of Twitter, and the emphasis placed on ‘real time’ idea-sharing and here-I-am visibility on the social web, I often wonder where blogging (all kinds) will be in five years. Perhaps it’s a dying art form.

However, this month, the ‘art of blogging’ seems to be in ample evidence throughout the medical blogosphere and the array of postings illustrates a vast diversity of approaches and opinions. In the posts mentioned, you’ll recognize many of the top names in medical blogging – these dedicated, talented professionals continue to work hard at updating their blogs regularly while carrying on with their work as medical librarians, informaticists and physicians.

Dean started his post by saying

It’s my great honour to be this month’s host for Medical Information Matters — the official name for the medical blog carnival (formerly MedLibs Round) where the “best blog posts in the field of medical information” are shared by prominent bloggers. I am very proud to consider many of these bloggers to be my colleagues and friends.”

But the honor is all mine! I’m glad I finally “dared” to ask him to host this blog carnival and that he accepted it without hesitation. And I, too, consider many of these bloggers, including Dean, to be my colleagues and friends. (Micro)blogging has made the world smaller…

Here are a few tweets mentioning this edition of the blog carnival, showing that it is widely appreciated (see more here):

  1. Dean Giustini
    giustini Here comes “Medical Blogging Matters: A Carnival of Ideas, November 2010″ http://bit.ly/aDzkLT [did I miss anyone? let me know]
  2. Francisco J Grajales
  3. westr
    westr Some big names in there! RT @pfanderson Medical blogging MATTERS http://bit.ly/aDzkLT
  4. Ves Dimov, M.D.
    DrVes Medical Information Matters: the weekly best of related blog posts http://goo.gl/sBgw2
  5. Kevin Clauson

this quote was brought to you by quoteurl

Next month Medical Information Matters will be hosted by another well known blogger: Martin Fenner of Gobblydook. Martin’s blog belonged to the Nature Network, but it was recently moved to the PLOS blog network.

According to the about section:

Martin Fenner works as a medical doctor and cancer researcher at the Hannover Medical School Cancer Center in Germany. He is writing about how the internet is changing scholarly communication. Martin can be found on Twitter as @mfenner.

So it seems that Martin combines 3 professions, that of a doctor, researcher, and a medical information specialist. This promises a wonderful round again.

The deadline for submission is Saturday December 4th (or perhaps even Sunday 5th).

The theme, if any, is not known yet. However, you can ALWAYS submit the URL/permalink of a recent, good quality post at:

http://blogcarnival.com/bc/submit_6092.html

(keep in touch, because we will write a call for submissions post later)

Finally a request to you all:

For 2011, I’m looking for new hosts, be it scientists, researchers, librarians, physicians or other health care workers, people who have hosted this blog carnival before, or not, people who have a longstanding reputation as blogger as well as people who just started blogging. It doesn’t matter, as long as you have a blog and you like hosting this blog carnival.

Please comment below or mail me at laika dot spoetnik at gmail dot com





Medical Information Matters: Call for Submissions

6 11 2010

I would like to remind you that it is almost the first Saturday of the Month and thus submission time for Medical Information Matters, the former MedLibs round.

Medical Information Matters is a monthly compilation of the “best blog post in the field of medical information”, hosted by a different blogger each time. The blogger who will host the upcoming edition is Dean Giustini.

I am sure that every librarian, and many doctors, know Dean. As a starting blogging librarian, I knew 2  international librarian bloggers: Dean Giustini and Krafty Librarian (make that 3, I forgot to mention David Rothman*) . I looked up to them and they did (and do) inspire me.
It is nice that blogging and Social Media can make distances shorter, literally and figuratively…

As far as I know, Dean has no theme for this round. But you can always submit any good quality post about medical information to the blog carnival. Whether you are a librarian, a doctor, a nurse, a patient and/or a scientist and whether your post is on searching, reference management, reliability of information, gaps in information, evidence, social media or education ( to name a few).
You can submit your own post or a good post of someone else, as long as it is in English.

So if that isn’t easy….

Please submit the URL/permalink of your post at:
http://blogcarnival.com/bc/submit_6092.html

If everything goes according to plan, you can read the Medical Information Matters 2.9 at the blog of Dean Giustini next Tuesday.

 

* Thanks to @DrVes via Twitter. Social Media is sooo powerful!





Medical Information Matters 2.8 is up!

15 10 2010

The new edition of Medical Information Matters (formerly Medlibs round) is up at Danielhooker.com.

The main theme is “Programs in libraries or medical education”.
Besides two posts from this blog (A Filter for Finding Animal Studies in PubMed” and more on the topic: An Educator by Chance) the following topics are included: a new MeSH (inclusion under mild librarian pressure), PubMed in your pocket, embedding Google Gadgets in normal webpages and experiences with introducing social bookmarking to medical students.
If you find this description to cryptic (and I bet you do), then I invite you to read the entire post here. I found it a very pleasant read.

Since we are already midway October, I would like to invite you to start submitting here (blog carnival submission form).

Our next host is Dean Giustini of the The Search Principle blog. The deadline is in about 3 weeks ( November 6th).

Related Articles





May I Introduce to you: a New Name for the MedLibs Round….

30 09 2010

A couple of weeks or even months ago I asked you to vote for a new name for the MedLibs Round, a blog carnival about medical information.

The decision was clear.

Hurray!

And the winner is……

Drumroll….

Medical Information Matters!

…………………

I’m very pleased with the results because the name reflects that the blog carnival is about medical information and is not purely a carnival for medical librarians.

I hope that Robin of Survive the Journey is still willing and able to make the logo for Medical Information Matters.

Well it will not be long for Medical Information Matters will be “inaugurated”.
We won’t restart the counting. So it will be Medical Information Matters 2.8

There are only a few days left from submitting.
Daniel Hooker at Danielhooker.com: Health libraries, Medicine and the Web is eagerly awaiting your submissions.

You can submit the URL of your post HERE at the Blog Carnival.

Daniel at his call for submissions post:

I’d love to see posts on new things you’re trying out this year: new projects, teaching sessions, innovative services. Maybe it’s something tried and true that you’d like to reflect on. And this goes for anyone starting out fresh this term, not just librarians! We should all be brimming with enthusiasm; the doldrums of winter have yet to set in. If you can find the time to reflect and even just write up your busy workday, I’ll do my best to weave them all together. I, for one, hope to describe some of the projects that I’m involved with at my new workplace. But remember, this “theme” is only a suggestion, we’d be happy to see any contributions that you think would be of interest.

Educators, librarians, doctors or scientists please remember: your submission matters…. No interesting blog carnival without your contribution. I’m looking forward to the next MedLibs round, the first Medical Information Matters Edition (it is a mouth full isn’t it?)

Related Articles





MedLibs Round 2.7 is up at Highlight HEALTH: Social Media in Health & Medicine.

11 08 2010

This months MedLibs Round is up at Highlight HEALTH. Walter Jessen has done an excellent job.

The theme of this Round is Social Media in Health and Medicine.

Many different people have contributed to it. Besides the medical librarians @eagledawg, @krafty and @laikas (me), also the physicians @amcunningham, @berci and @KevinMD, a geek/nurse  @PhilBaumann, scientists @HighlightHEALTH and @mfenner and other health care experts: @SusannahFox, @MaverickNY, @eyeonfda, iMedicalApps, @DermMatters and @MarkHawker.

I will say no more, please read the the compilation here

You can already start submitting to the next edition (just sign in and enter the URL of your post) at the submission form here.

The next edition will be hosted by Guus van den Brekel at DigiCMB. I don’t remember know if Guus has a theme in mind, we will hear next week when Guus is back from vacation. But you can submit any post as long as it is of good quality and pertains to medical information.

By the way this might be the last MedLibs Round.

No, I don’t mean we will stop with the blog carnival. It will possibly be renamed, depending on the outcome of the poll below.

It does look like the MedLibs Round is soon no more.

Want any influence? It is your last chance….

If you would like to host this blog carnival, please let me know (at this blog, at twitter (laikas) or by mail (laika dot spoetnik at gmail dot com).  Starting bloggers are welcome too. All months in 2011 are still available, so you can choose.





MedLibs Round August 2010: Call for Submissions.

3 08 2010

Tuesday, August 10th, it will be the second time that Walter Jessen will host the MedLibs Round at the well-known biomedical blog Highlight Health.

MedLib’s Round is a monthly blog carnival of “excellent blog posts in the field of medical information”.

The theme for this month’s edition of MedLib’s Round is “Leveraging social media to promote health information online”.

Although priority will be given to those posts that focus on leveraging social media to promote health information online, other topics will also be considered.

Please submit your article (thus the URL of the post) here no later than Sunday, August 8th at 04:00:00 UTC (12:00pm CST). You can also help Walter by suggesting good blog posts of others (i.e. via  the above-mentioned submission form or the Highlight Health contact form)

Not familiar with the MedLibs Round? Then have a look at previous editions of MedLibs Round listed at the MedLibs Round Archive.

Are you a Twitter user? Tweet this!

Related articles by Zemanta






MedLibs Round 2.6

11 07 2010

Welcome to this months edition of MedLib’s Round, a blog carnival of “excellent blog posts in the field of medical information”.

This round is a little belated, because of late submissions and my absence earlier this week.
But lets wait no longer …..!

Peer Review, Impact Factors & Conflict of Interest

Walter Jessen at Highlight HEALTH writes about the NIH Peer Review process. Included is an interesting video, that provides an inside look at how scientists from across the US review NIH grant applications for scientific and technical merit. These scientists do seem take their job seriously.

But what about peer review of scientific papers? Richard Smith, doctor, former editor of the BMJ and a proponent of open access publishing, wrote a controversial post at the BMJ Groups Blog called scrap peer review and beware of “top journals. Indeed  the “top journals” publish the sexy stuff, whereas evidence comprises both the glamorous and the unglamorous. But is prepublication peer review really that bad and should we only filter afterwards?

In a thoughtful post at his Nature blog Confessions of a (former) Lab Rat another Richard (Grant) argues that although peer review suffers terribly from several shortcomings it is still required. Richard Grant also clears up one misconception:

Peer review, done properly, might guarantee that work is done correctly and to the best of our ability and best intentions, but it will not tell you if a particular finding is right–that’s the job of other experimenters everywhere; to repeat the experiments and to build on them.

At Scholarly Kitchen (about what is hot and cooking in scholarly publishing) they don’t think peer review is a clear concept, since the list of ingredients differ per journal and article. Read their critical analysis and suggestions for improvement of the standard recipe here.

The science blogosphere was buzzing in outrage about the adding a corporate nutrition blog sponsored by PepsiCo to ScienceBlog (i.e see this post at the Guardian Science Blog). ScienceBlogs is the platform of eminent science bloggers, like OracPharyngula and Molecule of the Day. After some bloggers left ScienceBlog and others threatened to do so, the Pepsico Blog was retracted.

An interesting view is presented by David Crotty at Scholarly Kitchen. He states that it is “hypocritical for ScienceBlog’s bloggers to have objected so strenuously: ScienceBlogs has never been a temple of purity, free of bias or agenda.” Furthermore the bloggers enjoy more traffic and a fee for being a scienceblogger, and promote their “own business” too. David finds it particularly ironic that these complaints come from the science blogosphere, which has regularly been a bastion of support for the post-publication review philosophy. Read more here.

Indeed according to a note of Scienceblog at the disappeared blog their intention was “to engage industry in pursuit of science-driven social change”, although it was clearly not the right way.

The partiality of business, including pharma, makes it’s presence in and use of Social Media somewhat tricky. Still it is important for pharma to get involved in web2.0. Interested in a discussion on this topic? Than follow the tags #HCSM (HealthCare Social Media) and #HCSMEU (Europe) on Twitter.
Andrew Spong, has launched an open wiki, where you can read all about #HCSMEU.

The value of journal impact factors is also debatable. In the third part of the series “Show me the evidence” Kathleen Crea at EBM and Clinical Support Librarians @ UCHC starts with an excerpt of an article with the intriguing title “The Top-Ten in Journal Impact Factor Manipulation”:

The assumption that Impact Factor (IF) is a number absolutely proportional to science quality has led to misuses beyond the index’s original scope, even in the opinion of its devisor.”

The post itself (Teaching & Learning in Medicine, Research Methodology, Biostatistics: Show Me the Evidence (Part 3)b) is not so much about evidence, but offers a wealth of information about  journal impact factors, comparisons of sites for citation analysis, and some educational materials for teaching others about citation analysis. Not only are Journal Citation Reports and SCOPUS discussed, but also the Eigenfactor, h-index and JANE.

Perhaps we need another system of publishing and peer review? Will the future be to publish triplets and peer review these via Twitter by as many reviewers as possible? Read about this proposal of Barend Mons (of the same group that created JANE) at this blog. Here you can also find a critical review of an article comparing Google Scholar and PubMed for retrieving evidence.

Social Media, Blogs & Web 2.0 tools

There are several tools to manage the scientific articles, like CiteULike and Mendeley. At his blog Gobbledygook Martin Fenner discusses the pros and cons of a new web-based tool specifically for discussing papers in Journal Clubs: JournalFire

At the The Health Informaticists they found an interesting new feature of Skype:  screen sharing. Here you can read all about it.

Andrew Sprong explains at his blog STweM how to create a PDF archive of hashtagged tweets using whatthehashtag?! and Google DocsScribd or Slideshare. A tweet archive is very useful in case of  live tweet or stream sessions at conferences. (each tweet is then labeled with a # or hashtag, but tweets are lost after a few days if not archived)

L1010201At Cool Toy of the DayPatricia Anderson posts a lot about healthcare tools. She submitted Cool Toys Pic of the day – Eyewriter“, a tool for allowing persons with ALS and paralysis to draw artwork with their eyes. But you find a lot more readworthy posts at this blog and her main blog Emerging Technologies Librarian.

Heidi Allen at Heidi Allen Digital Strategy started a discussion on the meaning of social-medicine for Physicians. The link to the original submission doesn’t work right now, but if you follow this link you see several posts on social-medicine, including “Physicians in Social Media”, where 3 well-known physicians give their view on the meaning of social-medicine.

Dr Shock at Dr Shock MD PhD, wonders whether “the information on postpartum depression in popular lay magazines correspond to scientific knowledge?” Would it surprise you that this is not the case for many articles on this topic?

The post of Guus van den Brekel at DigiCMB with the inspiring title Discovering new seas of knowledge partly goes about the seas of knowledge gained at the EAHIL2010 (European Association for Health Information and Libraries) meeting, with an overview of many sessions, and materials when possible. And I should stress when possible, because the other  part of the post is about the difficulty of obtaining access to this sea of knowledge. Guus wonders:

In this age of Open Access, web 2.0 and the expectancy of the “users” -being us librarians (…) one would assume that much (if not all) is freely available via Conferences websites and/or social media. Why then do I find it hard to find the extra info about those events, including papers and slides and possibly even webcasts? Are we still not into the share-mode and overprotective to one’s own achievements(….)

Guus makes a good point,especially in this era, when not all of us are able to go and visit far away places. Luckily we have Guus who did a good job of compiling as much material as possible.

Wondering about the evidence for the usefulness of web 2.0, then have a look at this excellent wiki by Dean Giustini: http://hlwiki.slais.ubc.ca/index.php/Evidence-based_web_2.0.
The Health Librarianship Wiki Canada (the mother wiki) has a great new design and is a very rich source of information for medical librarians.

Another good source for recent peer reviewed papers about using social media in medicine and healthcare is a new series by Bertalan Mesko at Science Roll. First it was called Evidence Based Social Media News and now Social media journal club.

EHR and the clinical librarian.

Nikki Dettmar presents two posts on Electronic Health Records at Eagledawg.net, inspired by a recent Medical Library Association meeting that included a lot about electronic health records (EHRs). In the first part “Electronic Health Records: Not All About the Machine” she mentions the launch of an OpenNotes study that “evaluates the impact on both patients and physicians of sharing, through online medical record portals, the comments and observations made by physicians after each patient encounter.” The second post is entitled “a snapshot of ephemeral chaos“. And yes the title says it all.

Bertalan Mesko at Science Roll describes a try out of a Cardiology Resident and Research Fellow in Google Wave to see whether that platform is suitable for creating a database of the electronic records of a virtual patient. The database looks fine at first glance, but is it safe?

Alisha764’s Blog celebrated its 1 year anniversary in February. Alisha Miles aim for the next year is to not only post more but to focus on hospital libraries including her experience as a hospital librarian. Excellent idea, Alisha! I liked the post Rounding: A solo medical librarian’s perspective with several practical tips if you join the round as a librarian. I hope you can find time to write more like this, Alisha!

Our next host is Walter Jessen at Highlight HEALTH. You can already start submitting the link to a (relevant) post you have written here.

See the MedLibs Archive for more information.

Photo Credits:





The June MedLib’s Round is up & Call for Submissions.

14 06 2010

Yes, the latest edition of the Medlibs Round is up at EBM and Clinical Support Librarians@UCHC! Kathleen aka Creaky did a wonderful job compiling this round, with the main theme “service”.

Posts vary from a summary of the MLA-congress, to the first systematic review search of a librarian,  a friend’s request for help in finding information on breast cancer is, disclosure of conflicts of interest, collaborative librarianship through social media and (much) more. Read it all at Creaky’s blog!

Now it is only 2 weeks for the next deadline (Saturday, July the 3rd is the official deadline). So you better start writing and/or submit recent posts!

There is no theme, I will accept all relevant and good quality posts pertaining to medical librarianship, in the braodest sense of the word.

I would like to see posts about (for instance):

  • Social media (and medical information)
  • Searches, Search-engines & Databases (i.e. PubMed)
  • Reference Manager Systems
  • Library congresses (EAHIL?)
  • Web 2.0 tools, I-Phones, I-pads
  • Open Access, Publishing
  • Reliability of Information, Patient Information
  • Evidence Based Medicine

So NOT ONLY librarians, but also doctors and other healthcare workers, patients, pharma-people and scientists are invited to submit.

Submitting is easy, just submit the permalink (URL) of your post (at your blog) at the blog carnival here. For examples and Faqs see the MedLibs Round-ARCHIVE.

If you have no blog but would like to submit you are welcome to write a guest post at this blog.

************

I would also like to take the opportunity to ask if there are any Med- or Medlib-bloggers out there who would like to host the MEDLIBS round August, September, October or later this year!
A host for August is rather urgent as I will be on vacation the second half of July.

And if you didn’t fill in the poll below you still have the opportunity to do so. When we have a new name, the next step is to ask Robin of Survive the Journey to make a logo for us.





MedLibs Round: Update & Call for Submissions June 2010

4 06 2010

In the past months we had some excellent hosts of the round, really “la crème de la crème” of the medical information/libarary blogosphere:

2010 was heralded by Dr Shock MD PhD, followed by Emerging Technologies Librarian (@pfanderson) The Krafty Librarian (@krafty) and @Eagledawg (Nikki Dettmar).

Nikki  hosted the round for a second time, but now on her new blog: Eagledawg.net. The title: E(Patients)-I(Pad)-O(pportunities):Medlibs Round

Last Month the round was hosted by Danni (Danni4info) at The Health Informaticist, my favorite English EBM-library blog. It is a great round again, about “dealing with PubMed trending analysis, liability in information provision, the ‘splinternet’, a search engine optimisation (SEO) teaser from CILIP’s fresh off the presses Update magazine, and more. Missed it? You can read it here.

And now we have a few days left to submit our posts for the Next MedLibs Round, hosted by yet another excellent EBM/librarian blogger: @creaky at EBM and Clinical Support Librarians@UCHC.

She would like posts about “Reference Questions (or People) I Won’t Forget” (thus “memorable” encounters that took place in a public service/reference desk setting, over your career) or “how the library/librarian” has helped you.
But as always other relevant and good quality posts related to medical information and medical librarianship will also be considered.

For more details see the (2nd!) Call for submissions post at EBM and Clinical Support Librarians@UCHC

I am sure you all have a story to tell. So please share it with @creaky and us!

As always, you can submit the permalink (URL) (of your post(s) on your blog) here.

************

I would also like to take the opportunity to ask if there are any med- or medlib-bloggers out there who would like to host the MEDLIBS round August, September, October.

The MEDLIBs Round is still called the MedLibs round because I got too little response (6 votes including mine) to the poll with other name suggestions. Neither did I get any suggestions regarding the design of the MEDLIBS-logo, Robin of Survive the Journey has offered to make [for details see request here]. I hope you will take the time to fill in the poll below, and to think about any suggestions for a logo. Thanks!

@ links to the twitteraccounts





MedLibs Round. Update & Call for Submissions

2 04 2010

Some news about The MedLibs Round, the monthly blog carnival of blog posts on subjects pertaining to Medical Information.

A new LOGO.

Perhaps you remember that I was looking for someone who could design a logo for this blog carnival.

And you know what. Robin has offered to do so for free!

Robin is wonderful woman and the author of two great blogs I follow: Survive the Journey (http://survivethejourney.blogspot.com/) and 365 days with Cushing’s Disease (http://cushings365.posterous.com/). The latter blog documents the life of a Cushing’s Disease patient and survivor with pictures.

Of course Robin needs some help. What should the logo look like? Any ideas?

A New Name?

A new spring, a new sound (Herman Gorter’s May). Thus,  a new logo, a new name?

The name MedLibs Round suggests it is blog carnival purely meant for medical librarians and that is not the case. Or at least it is not what I had in mind, when starting this round. This blog carnival is about medical information. Sure, medical librarians play an essential role, but I would like an exchange of thought between those who need and those who search the medical information (not mutually exclusive).

And I was also thinking, if we made a more appealing name it might be easier to make a logo (not only consisting of a book).

Most suggestions consist of “Medical Information” (instead of MedLib) and Round, Ring, Circle or Carnival. Similarly, MIR stands for Information Round (or Ring) [& can be depicted as Myrrh] etc.

Not very original, so if you have better ideas, and especially more appealing ones, this is your chance.

In fact it just needs to be clear. Like Gene Genie (http://genegenie.wordpress.com/) was clearly about Genes and Genetic Diseases.

(you need not be a contributor to this round to cast your vote)

Past & upcoming MedLibs Rounds

The last MedLibs Round was hosted by Michelle Kraft at the Krafty Librarian. You can read her compilation here.

Next months we have again a wonderful bunch of people hosting the round: In May and April the EBM blogs  The Health Informaticist (link), followed by EBM and Clinical Support Librarians@UCHC (link),

But first we will welcome Nikki Dettmar of Eagle Dawg (moved to http://eagledawg.net/) as a host once again. She is eagerly awaiting your submissions.
Officially the deadline is tomorrow night, but we don’t mind you enjoying your Easter Holiday first.

Please don’t forget to submit your post(s) (the URL of the post on your blog) here.





Three Editions of the MedLibs Rounds & Call for Submissions!

2 03 2010

I’m running behind…. Two Three editions of the MedLibs Round have already been published since my last post on the subject.
The MedLibs Round -as you may know- is a monthly blog carnival of blog posts on subjects pertaining to medical information.

At one point almost half of my posts was about a Grand Round, the MedLibs Round or whatever Round. So I decided not to summarize each round, because that might be annoying for some of my readers.

On the other hand the MedLibs Round is my child, my little toddler. It must be cherished and nurtured to let it grow. I should be a better parent.

Last three times the Round was hosted by three wonderful hosts.

December 15th the MedLibs Round was hosted by Knowledge beyond words, the blog of Novoseek, a biomedical search engine. Novoseek succeeded to host a very interesting MedLibs Round entitled: “Social media, web services and tips for health in MedLib’s Round 1.9

A sparkling New Year Edition (MedLibs Round 1.10) was hosted at Dr. Shock MD PhD, a neurostimulating blog.

Finally the second year of this blog carnival (2.1) was started by Patricia Anderson at Emerging Technologies Librarian. This edition was plagued by too few relevant submissions, and too much spam. This was a pity because the theme was really interesting: “Free Speech in Health Information, and More“. Hopefully Patricia would like to give it another try later.

Of course we don’t want this to happen to our next host, Michelle Kraft, also known as The Krafty Librarian (her blog name). Michelle doesn’t need an introduction I guess. With Patricia she is one of the first -and most well known- medical librarian bloggers.

Michelle is really looking forward to some good quality post that she can include in her blog carnival.

She doesn’t have a theme in mind, as long as your post is related to medicine and libraries in some way. Some topic examples are: library technology, librarianship, Evidence Based Medicine (EBM), PubMed, bibliographic databases, information literacy, open access, print vs. online, medical apps, library apps, mobile technology, user education.
Note that some subject need not be strictly medical either, i.e. SCOPUS, database management or open access.

So Michelle asks all of you medical, health, and library bloggers out there to consider submitting one of you posts to the carnival. Posts can be written especially for this carnival or may be recently published posts on the subject. And if you’ve read an excellent post elsewhere you can tip Michelle and/or ask the author to submit. We need your input!

Just submit the URL of your post by March 6, 2010 to the Carnival Submission form.

The post will be up Tuesday March 9, 2010 at the Krafty Librarian.

For more info see the Call for Submissions -post at http://kraftylibrarian.com/?p=418 and the MedLibs Archive here

And people who like to write a post but have no blog are invited to write a guest post here. Just leave a comment or contact me by email:

laika.spoetnik@gmail.com

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Medlibs Round 1.9 – Call for Submissions

30 11 2009

The MedLib’s Round Blog Carnival is a monthly blog carnival that showcases excellent posts in medical librarianship. The  carnival is not restricted to librarians – anyone can submit as long as the post is relevant and of good quality. If you have an article on medical librarianship, PubMed, evidence-based medicine, information literacy or Web 2.0 tools etc., you’re welcome to submit to our next host, Knowledge beyond words. There is no special theme.

If you have no personal blog, be my guest to post an article at this blog.

Please submit your article before December 5th through this form. The MedLib’s Round 1.9 should be available on December 8th.

An archive of all previous editions of MedLibs Round is listed at the MedLib’s Archive on Laika’s MedLibLog.

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