Lanyrd, the Social Conference Directory

24 11 2010

I’m a blogger who usually needs quite some time to write blog posts. However, I just learned about a new tool that I need not describe in detail. Firstly, because Heidi Allen just described the tool in a blog post here. Secondly, because the tool is so intuitive and easy.

I’m talking about Lanyrd, a directory of geeky events, technical conferences and social meetings.

It is really so simple and effective. Please follow me.

You go to http://lanyrd.com/, connect via OAuth to Twitter and before you can count to 3, Lanyrd shows you the conferences your friends on Twitter are going to as a speaker (blue border) or an attendee. You can also see friends who keep track of the conference (vague).

Unfortunately purely scientific or medical conferences are not included, but who knows what Lanyrd is up to.

You can track the conferences by subscribing in iCal / Outlook. It is also easy to add conferences.

I might go to Medicine 2.0, but I didn’t make up my mind yet. If I click on the link I see the following page:

You can click on “Attend” or on “Track” if this applies. Furthermore you get an overview of the conference: the location, the link to the website, the Twitter account, the hashtag used in tweets (#med2) and of the speakers.

Oh …. there are none yet, so I added a few.

It is easy to do, people who have never logged into the site can also be added. However, if helps to know the exact twitter name, if many people on Twitter share the same name (else you have to check all the profiles generated with Twitter search).

Lanyrd is the baby of the recently married couple Simon Willison and Natalie Downe. And as it goes with babies, they grow up.

What can we expect the next few years?

Simon in the Guardian:

“We have lots of exciting plans for Lanyrd’s future. One of the things we’re very keen on is gathering information on past conferences – speaker slides, videos, audio recordings and write-ups. In five years’ time, we hope we’ll have the best collection of conference coverage possible.”

Credits to Heidi Allen (@dreamingspires) and Anne Marie Cunningham (@amcunningham) who discussed Lanyrd on Twitter. As said, Heidi wrote a post on Lanyrd, and Anne Marie wrote a short blogpost at Wishful Thinking in Medical Education on the need to find list of upcoming medical or health conferences- and the hashtags that would be used to cover them on twitter. The Solution as it appeared was Lanyrd (at least for some of the conferences).





Presentation at the #NVB09: “Help, the doctor is drowning”

16 11 2009

15-11-2009 23-24-33 nvb congressenLast week I was invited to speak at the NVB-congress, the Dutch society for librarians and information specialists. I replaced Josje Calff in the session “the professional”, chaired by Bram Donkers of the magazine InformatieProfessional. Other sessions were: “the client”, “the technique” and “the connection”. (see program)

It was a very successful meeting, with Andrew Keen and Bas Haring in the plenary session. I understand from tweets and blogposts that @eppovannispen en @lykle who were in parallel sessions were especially interesting.
Some of the (Dutch) blogposts (Not about my presentation….pfew) are:

I promised to upload my presentation to Slideshare. And here it is.

Some slides are different from the original. First, Slideshare doesn’t allow animation, (so slides have to be added to get a similar effect), second I realized later that the article and search I showed in Ede were not yet published, so I put “top secret” in front of it.

The title refers to a Dutch book and film: “Help de dokter verzuipt” (“Help the doctor is drowning”).

Slides 2-4: NVB-tracks; why I couldn’t discuss “the professional” without explaining the changes with which the medical profession is confronted.

Slides 5-8: Clients of a medical librarian (dependent on where he/she works).

Slides 9-38: Changes to the medical profession (less time, opinion-based medicine gradually replaced by evidence based medicine, information overload, many sources, information literacy)

Slides 39-66: How medical librarians can help (‘electronic’ collection accessible from home, study landscape for medical students, less emphasis on books, up to date with alerts (email, RSS, netvibes), portals (i.e. for evidence based searching), education (i.e. courses, computer workshops, e-learning), active participation in curriculum, helping with searches or performing them).

Slides 67-68: Summary (Potential)

Slide 69: Barriers/Risks: Money, support (management, contact persons at the departments/in the curriculum), doctors like to do it theirselves (it looks easy), you have to find a way to reach them, training medical information specialists.

Slides 70-73 Summary & Credits

Here are some tweets related to this presentation.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]




BlogWorld Expo [SOTB]: Two Additional Videos

25 10 2009

s739843689_121258_9975 dr valToday I learned there were two more videos realted to the BlogWorld Expo, that I shouldn’t withhold you.

First, the ABC News Covered the Medblogger Track At Blog World Expo. Here is an interview with Dr. Val Jones with Dave Lucas of ABC.

The video “Medical Bloggers On ABC News: Empowering Patients With Accurate Information” is summarized as follows at her blog Get Better Health:

….”Dave Lucas is tired of all the false health information that fills his email inbox each day. He’s very relieved that there are physicians, nurses, and patient advocates “swimming against the tide” of pseudoscience and misleading health information online. Today Dave and I discussed how people can find accurate and potentially life-saving health information through peer-reviewed medical blogs, thanks to the health blogger code of ethics (administered by MedPage Today)”.

Another interview was with Paul Levy, President and CEO of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, and author of Running a Hospital. Paul participated in a panel discussion as part of the Medblogger Track (co-sponsored by Johnson & Johnson and MedPage Today). Because the video is barely audible, I just mention his main statements (highlighted in red in the video shown here at the JNJ Health Channel):

  • Paul writes his blogposts without any prior permission or approval process
  • It is quicker to fix a mistake on a blog, than it is in traditional media
  • Biggest regret is responding to sarcastic or hostile comments in kind instead of staying above the fray

Medical Bloggers On ABC News: Empowering Patients With Accurate Information

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]




BlogWorld Expo [SOTB] & The Status of the Medical Blogosphere

25 10 2009

During my stay in Singapore from October 9th-16th there were 2 other great events, one of them  being the Blogworld Expo, the  World largest Conference on Blogging in the Las Vegas Convention Center. As a matter of fact, I would never have the opportunity to go to such a place, because I’m blogging in my spare time and although it has many spin-offs for my work, I would never have the resources and the time to go there. So, it was with a little jealousy and envy that I followed all those cheerful tweets from my colleague medbloggers. They apparently had a lot to talk about, -also outside the context of the meeting. I even understood that Bongi came all the way from South Africa.  And I can’t say the video below eases the pain ;) :

more about “Scenes from Blog World Expo 2009 and …“, posted with vodpod
Image of Kim McAllister from Facebook
Image of Kim McAllister

It was the first time during the Blogworld Expo there was a medblogging-track. Thanks to the effort of Kim McAllister of Emergiblog. She posted a kind of a *rant* that there was nothing for medbloggers at two events. Seeing this, one organizer of Blogworld Expo commented: we have a place for you if you want to come. Johnson & Johnson were willing to sponsor, and MedPage Today offered an additional sponsorship. Below is an interview with Kim as well as with another well known blogging nurse, Gina Rybolt of Codeblog. In this interview “the conversation turns to why they blog, how they manage to do it without compromising their patient’s privacy and how they wish marketers and pharma brands would approach them.”

Rohit Bhargava who interviewed both nurses also interviewed the famous medical blogger Kevin Pho of KevinMD about why he blogs, what results he has seen and the future of the medical blogosphere the future of Medical Blogging. He makes clear why it is important for doctors to blog. However, there is one major obstacle for busy physicians, namely: TIME!

Want more information an/or pictures on the medblog-part of the conference, please see:

The opening keynote of the Blogworld Expo was delivered by Richard Jalichandra, CEO of Technorati, showing some highlights from their annual study following the growth and trends in the annual State of the Blogosphere. The report was released over five days. (See Techcruch for presentation and short explanation ; the entire report is available at Technorati)

What I found most interesting:

  • In Social Media the content is the conversation.
  • There is a rising class of “professional” bloggers.
  • But still Hobbyists represent 76% of all bloggers
    (I have some problems with the division in ‘professional bloggers’ and ‘hobbyist’ though, since professional bloggers are those regarded as “earning some money” and hobbyists are regarded as those that don’t. I think there should at least be 3 main groups: those blogging as a profession (earn money), those blogging as an expert (mostly) in their free time (professionally) and those writing about their hobbies, children etc (hobbyists).
  • The hobbyists blog for fun and to express themselves
  • 15% is part time professional, they blog to supplement their income and to share their expertise
  • 9% is self-employed, 4% is corporate (see Figure below)
  • Of the professional bloggers 2 thirds are male, 16% are 18-44, are more effluent and educated than the general population and the hobbyist bloggers (hmmm that also pleads against medbloggers not belonging to this group)
  • 73% of all bloggers use Twitter vs 14% of the general population (but nr 1 reason is to promote their blog)
  • 26% of bloggers who also use Twitter say that the service has eaten into the time they spend updating their traditional blogs – though 65% say it has had no effect.
  • on average only .83% of the page views come from Twitter referrals.
  • Advise to succeed: be passionate.
  • Bloggers believe that politics (57%) and technology/business (44%-20%) are among the fields most impacted by the blogosphere, and that they will continue to be transformed by the blogosphere going forward. Health was only mentioned by 5%.

I wonder where/whether Science/Health/Medbloggers fit in? Are they underrepresented in the study? Or do they belong to a minority anyway? See here a discussion on Twitter (catched with QuoteURL)

sotb1 technorati 209

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]




#Cochrane Colloquium 2009: Better Working Relationship between Cochrane and Guideline Developers

19 10 2009

singapore CCLast week I attended the annual Cochrane Colloquium in Singapore. I will summarize some of the meetings.

Here is a summary of an interesting (parallel) special session: Creating a closer working relationship between Cochrane and Guideline Developers. This session was brought together as a partnership between the Guidelines International Network (G-I-N) and The Cochrane Collaboration to look at the current experience of guideline developers and their use of Cochrane reviews (see abstract).

Emma Tavender of the EPOC Australian Satellite, Australia reported on the survey carried out by the UK Cochrane Centre to identify the use of Cochrane reviews in guidelines produced in the UK ) (not attended this presentation) .

Pwee Keng Ho, Ministry of Health, Singapore, is leading the Health Technology Assessment (HTA) and guideline development program of the Singapore Ministry of Health. He spoke about the issues faced as a guideline developer using Cochrane reviews or -in his own words- his task was: “to summarize whether guideline developers like Cochrane Systematic reviews or not” .

Keng Ho presented the results of 3 surveys of different guideline developers. Most surveys had very few respondents: 12-29 if I remember it well.

Each survey had approximately the same questions, but in a different order. On the face of it, the 3 surveys gave the same picture.

Main points:

  • some guideline developers are not familiar with Cochrane Systematic Reviews
  • others have no access to it.
  • of those who are familiar with the Cochrane Reviews and do have access to it, most found the Cochrane reviews useful and reliable. (in one survey half of the respondents were neutral)
  • most importantly they actually did use the Cochrane reviews for most of their guidelines.
  • these guideline developers also used the Cochrane methodology to make their guidelines (whereas most physicians are not inclined to use the exhaustive search strategies and systematic approach of the Cochrane Collaboration)
  • An often heard critique of Guideline developers concerned the non-comprehensive coverage of topics by Cochrane Reviews. However, unlike in Western countries, the Singapore minister of Health mentioned acupuncture and herbs as missing topics (for certain diseases).

This incomplete coverage caused by a not-demand driven choice of subjects was a recurrent topic at this meeting and a main issue recognized by the entire Cochrane Community. Therefore priority setting of Cochrane Systematic reviews is one of the main topics addressed at this Colloquium and in the Cochrane Strategic review.

Kay Dickersin of the US Cochrane Center, USA, reported on the issues raised at the stakeholders meeting held in June 2009 in the US (see here for agenda) on whether systematic reviews can effectively inform guideline development, with a particular focus on areas of controversy and debate.

The Stakeholder summit concentrated on using quality SR’s for guidelines. This is different from effectiveness research, for which the Institute of Medicine (IOM) sets the standards: local and specialist guidelines require a different expertise and approach.

All kinds of people are involved in the development of guidelines, i.e. nurses, consumers, physicians.
Important issues to address, point by point:

  • Some may not understand the need to be systematic
  • How to get physicians on board: they are not very comfortable with extensive searching and systematic work
  • Ongoing education, like how-to workshops, is essential
  • What to do if there is no evidence?
  • More transparency; handling conflicts of interest
  • Guidelines differ, including the rating of the evidence. Almost everyone in the Stakeholders meeting used GRADE to grade the evidence, but not as it was originally described. There were numerous variations on the same theme. One question is whether there should be one system or not.
  • Another -recurrent- issue was that Guidelines should be made actionable.

Here are podcasts covering the meeting

Gordon Guyatt, McMaster University, Canada, gave  an outline of the GRADE approach and the purpose of ‘Summary of Findings’ tables, and how both are perceived by Cochrane review authors and guideline developers.

Gordon Guyatt, whose magnificent book ” Users’ Guide to the Medical Literature”  (JAMA-Evidence) lies at my desk, was clearly in favor of adherence to the original Grade-guidelines. Forty organizations have adopted these Grade Guidelines.

Grade stands for “Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation”  system. It is used for grading evidence when submitting a clinical guidelines article. Six articles in the BMJ are specifically devoted to GRADE (see here for one (full text); and 2 (PubMed)). GRADE not only takes the rigor of the methods  into account, but also the balance between the benefits and the risks, burdens, and costs.

Suppose  a guideline would recommend  to use thrombolysis to treat disease X, because a good quality small RCTs show thrombolysis to be slightly but significantly more effective than heparin in this disease. However by relying on only direct evidence from the RCT’s it isn’t taken into account that observational studies have long shown that thrombolysis enhances the risk of massive bleeding in diseases Y and Z. Clearly the risk of harm is the same in disease X: both benefits and harms should be weighted.
Guyatt gave several other examples illustrating the importance of grading the evidence and the understandable overview presented in the Summary of Findings Table.

Another issue is that guideline makers are distressingly ready to embrace surrogate endpoints instead of outcomes that are more relevant to the patient. For instance it is not very meaningful if angiographic outcomes are improved, but mortality or the recurrence of cardiovascular disease are not.
GRADE takes into account if indirect evidence is used: It downgrades the evidence rating.  Downgrading also occurs in case of low quality RCT’s or the non-trade off of benefits versus harms.

Guyatt pleaded for uniform use of GRADE, and advised everybody to get comfortable with it.

Although I must say that it can feel somewhat uncomfortable to give absolute rates to non-absolute differences. These are really man-made formulas, people agreed upon. On the other hand it is a good thing that it is not only the outcome of the RCT’s with respect to benefits (of sometimes surrogate markers) that count.

A final remark of Guyatt: ” Everybody makes the claim they are following evidence based approach, but you have to learn them what that really means.”
Indeed, many people talk about their findings and/or recommendations being evidence based, because “EBM sells well”, but upon closer examination many reports are hardly worth the name.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]




This week I will blog from…..

10 10 2009

35167809 singapore colloquiumPicture taken by Chris Mavergames http://twitpic.com/kxrnl

Chris and I will facilitate a web 2.0 workshop for the Cochrane (see here, for all workshops see here).
The entire program can be viewed at the Cochrane Colloquium site.

Chris Mavergames, Web Operations Manager and Information Architect of the Cochrane Collaboration will also give a plenary presentation entitled:
Cochrane for the Twitter generation:
inserting ourselves into the ‘conversation
‘”.

The session has the promising title: The Cochrane Library – brave new world?

Here is the introductory text of the session:

The Cochrane Collaboration is not unique in facing a considerable challenge to the way it packages and disseminates healthcare information. The proliferation of communication platforms and social networking sites provides opportunities to reach new audiences, but how far can or should the Collaboration go in embracing these new media? In this session we hear from speakers who are at the heart of the discussions about The Cochrane Library’s future direction, including the Library’s Editor in Chief. We finish the session with reflections on the week’s discussions with respect to the Strategic Review (…)

Request (for the workshop, not the plenary session):
If you ‘re on Twitter, could you please tell the participants of the (small) web 2.0 workshop  your opinion on the following, using the hashtag #CC20.
*

  1. Why Web 2.0 is useful? (or not)
  2. Why we need Cochrane 2.0? (or not)

An example of such an answer (from @Berci):

#CC20 Web 2.0 opens up the world and eases communication. Cochrane 2.0 is needed bc such an important database should have a modern platform

If you don’t have Twitter you can add your comment here and I will post it for you (if you leave a name).

Thanks for all who have contributed so far.

—–

*this is only for our small-scaled workshop, I propose to use #CC2009 for the conference itself.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]







Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 611 other followers