An Introduction to the Library for Graduate Students

6 11 2010

Below is a presentation I gave at the “World of Science”. This is a 3-day course for graduate students that aims to provide them the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for scientific research, and to prepare them for their thesis at our hospital, the AMC.

The 3-day program comprises a series of presentations on aspects of medical and biomedical research. These include the position of the pharmaceutical industry, the role of scientific journals, the ethical and legal framework of medical research, and the organization and funding of scientific research in the Netherlands. There is also an introduction to the scientific strategy of the AMC, presented by the Dean of the Faculty of Medicine.

Furthermore there are group discussions, workshops, and individual assignments.

The course is held outside the AMC. It provides a unique opportunity for a closer and more personal meeting with each other and with leading AMC scientists, to discuss such matters as the choices they made in their careers.

I had 15 minutes (actually 20 minutes) to tell something about the library. (It used to be 30 min. but wasn’t received so well). That is too short to explain searching to them. Furthermore that is dealt with in our courses, so why give it all away?

I choose to show them how the library could serve them, in an interactive and loose way.

First I asked them how they saw the library. Many, if not all, used our website. Pfff, that was a relieve!

I spend most time talking about searching, showing  examples of searches that failed. Which is the best way to show them they might need some extra education in this respect.

The atmosphere was very good & informal, there were many questions and it was sometimes quite hilarious, not only because of the presentation itself, but because I almost managed to ruin the screen (fell against it) and because I walked away with the microphone.

I had the opportunity to listen to the next speaker too, a young scientist who recently finished his thesis. His talk was great to listen to. He talked about his experience (which was not really representative imho, because it was quite a success story) and he gave the would-be PhD’s 10 handy tips. All in a very entertaining way.

But for now, here is my presentation.





An Educator by Chance

13 10 2010

The topic of the oncoming edition of the blog carnivalMedical Information Matters“, hosted by Daniel Hooker, is close to my heart.

Daniel at his call for submissions post:

I’d love to see posts on new things you’re trying out this year: new projects, teaching sessions, innovative services. Maybe it’s something tried and true that you’d like to reflect on. And this goes for anyone starting out fresh this term, not just librarians!

When I started as a clinical librarian 5 years ago, I mainly did search requests. Soon I also gave workshops as part of evidence based practice courses.

Our library gave the normal library courses PubMed, Reference Manager etc. We did little extra for medical students. There was a library introduction at the beginning and a PubMed training at the end of the curriculum.

Thus, when the interns had to do a CAT (Critically Appraised Topic), they had to start from SCRATCH ;) : learn the PICO, domains, study types, searching the various databases.  After I gave  a dozen or so 1-hour long introductions to consecutive interns, repeating the same things over and over, I realized this was an ineffective use of time. So I organized a monthly CAT-introduction with a computer workshop. After this introduction I helped interns with their specific CAT, if necessary.

This course is appreciated very much and  interns usually sigh: “why didn’t we learn this before?! If we had known this…”, etcetera.

Thus we, librarians, were very enthusiastic when we got more time in the newly organized curriculum.

We made e-learning modules for the first year, two for the second year, a Pubmed-tutorial, and a computer workshop (150 min!). In the 4th year we grade the CATs.

The e-learning modules costed me tons of time. If you read the post “How to become a big e-learning nerd by mistake” at Finite Attention Span you understand why.

We used a system that was designed for exams. On my request the educational department embed the system in a website, so students could go back and forth. Lacking any good books on the topic, students should also be able to reread the text and print whatever they liked.

I was told that variation was important. Thus I used each and every of the 10 available question types. Drop down menus, clickable menus, making right pairs of terms etc. Ooh and I loved the one I used for PICO’s, where you could drag words in a sentence to the P, I, C or O. Wonderful.

Another e-learning module consisted largely of Adobe Captivate movies. As  described in the above mentioned post:

Recognise that you are on a learning curve. First of all, it is vital that your software does not always remind you to save individual files before closing the program. It is especially helpful if you can demonstrate this three times inside a week, so that you end up losing the equivalent of about two days’ work: this will provide you with a learning experience that is pretty much optimised.

Swear. Vigorously.

Become a virtuoso of the panic-save, performing Ctrl+S reflexively in your sleep, every three minutes (…)

Correcting the callouts and highlight boxes and animation timings so they don’t look like they were put together by committee is complicated. Also, writing really clear, unambiguous copy takes time.

It sounds familiar. It also regularly happened to me that I started with the wrong resolution. Then I heard afterwards: “Sorry, we can only use 800×600.”

But workshops are also time-consuming. Largely because the entire librarian staff is needed to run 30 workshops within a month (we have 350 students per year). Of course it didn’t end with those workshops. I had to make the lesson plan materials, had to instruct the tutors, make the time tables, the attendance lists and then put the data into an excel sheet again. I love it!

The knowledge is tested by exams. This year I had to make the questions myself -and score them too (luckily with help of one or two colleagues). Another time buster. The CATs had to be scored as well.

But it is worth all the pain and effort, isn’t it?

Students are sooo glad they learned all about EBM, CATS, scientific literature and searching…

Well, duh, not really.

Some things I learned in the meantime

  1. Medical students don’t give a da do not care much about searching and information literacy.
  2. Medical students don’t choose that study for nothing. They want to become doctors, not librarians.
  3. At the time we give the courses, the students not really need it. Unlike the interns, they do not need to present a CAT, shortly.
  4. Most of our work is undone by the influence of peers or tutors that learn the students all kind of “tricks” that aren’t.
  5. It is hard to make good exams. If the reasoning isn’t watertight, students will find it. And protest against it.
  6. …. Because even more important than becoming a doctor is their desire to pass the exams
  7. If the e-learning isn’t compulsory, it won’t be done.
  8. You can’t  test information literacy by multiple choice questions. It is “soft” knowledge, more a kind of approach or reasoning. Similarly PICO’s are seldom 100% wrong or right. The value of PICO-workshops lies in the discussions.
  9. The students just started their study. They’re mostly teens. These kids will have a completely other attitude after 4 years (no longer yelling, joking, mailing, Facebook-ing, or at least they are likely to stop after you ask).
  10. Education is something I did by chance. I just do it “in addition to my normal work”, i.e. in the same time.
  11. Even more important, I’m a beginner and have had no specific training. So I have to learn it the hard way.

Let me give some examples.

This year I wanted to update one of my modules. I had to, because practically all interfaces have changed the last two years (Think about PubMed for instance).

I made an appointment with the education department, because they had helped me enormously before.

Firstly I noticed that my name had been replaced by those of 3 people who hadn’t done anything (at least with regard to this particular e-learning course). Perhaps not so relevant here. But the first red flag…

The module was moved to another system. It looked much nicer, but apparently only allowed a few of those 10 types of questions. The drag and drop questions, I was so fond of, were replaced by irritating drop down menus. With the questions I made, it didn’t make sense.

The movies couldn’t be plaid fast forward, back or be stopped.

And the girl who I spoke to, a medical student herself, couldn’t disguise her dislike of the movies. First she didn’t like the call-outs and highlight boxes, she rather liked a voice (me speaking, deleting the laborious call-outs ?!). Then she said the videos were endless and it was nicer when the students could try it themselves (which was in fact the assignment). She ignored my suggestion that Adobe is suitable for virtual online training.

Then someone next to her said: Do you know “Snag-it”, you can make movies with that too!?

Do I know Snag-it? Yes I do. I even bought it for my home computer. But Snag-it is nowhere near Adobe Captivate, at least regarding call-outs and assembly. I almost mentioned Camtasia, which is from the same company as Snag-it, but more suitable for this job.

Then the girl said the movies were only meant to show “where to press the buttons”, which I repeatedly denied: those movies were meant to highlight the value of the various sources. She also suggested that I should do some usability testing, not on my colleagues, but on the students.

Funny how insights can change over times. The one who helped me considered it one of the best tutorials.

While talking to her, it stroke me that the movies were taking very long and I wondered whether each single call-out saying “press this” was functional. Perhaps she was right in a way. Perhaps some movies should be changed into plain screenshots (which I had tried to avoid, because they were so annoying Powerpoint like). If my aim wasn’t that students learned which button to press, why show it all the time?? (perhaps because Adobe shows every mouse click, it is so easy to keep it in..)

It is a long way to develop something that is educative, effective and not boring….

But little by little we can make things better.

Last year one of the coordinators proposed not to take an exam the first year but give an assignment. The students had to search for an original study on a topic in PubMed (2nd semester) and write a summary about it (3rd semester). The PubMed tutorial became compulsory, but the two Q & A sessions (with computers) were voluntary. Half of the students came to those sessions. And the atmosphere was very good. Most students really wanted to find a good study (you could only claim an article once). Some fished whether the answers were worth the full 4 points and what they had to do to get it. The quality of the searches and the general approach were quite good.

In good spirits I will start with updating the other modules. The first should be finished in a few days. That is… if they didn’t move this module to the next semester, as the catalog indicates.

That would be a shame, because then I have to change all the cardiology examples into pulmonology examples.

Gosh!…. No!!

Credits

The title is inspired by the  post “How to become a big e-learning nerd by mistake”.
Thanks to Annemarie Cunningham (@amcunningham on Twitter) for alerting me to it.

Related Articles





Fighting “Powerpoint-Death” by Science, Prezi or…?!

24 08 2010
Audience response radio frequency keypad with ...

Image via Wikipedia

Recently Kevin Clauson [@kevinclauson] made another great presentation, called the “Science behind Engaging Students in Class”. The presentation focuses on the use of “clickers” or an audience response system (ARS) to engage the audience (here mainly students in a class). It is an expanded version of “How to Fight Lecturalgia“.

First Kevin asks the audience questions about their knowledge/use of ARS -using the ARS system, of course-. Next he goes more deeply into the need to engage the audience (attention span, boredom) and then he addresses the successes and pitfalls of ARS.

Each statement has a scientific underpinning, and a reference to it.

For instance, one conclusion is that use of ARS improves performance with analytical type exam questions, but not with memorization exam questions.

Kevin stresses that ARS  it is just another tool, albeit a powerful one.

Of course you have to avoid the usual presentation-killer aspects of PowerPoint, like including too many slides, bullets and data, as so wonderfully illustrated by the famous “Dead by Powerpoint” presentation. I included it below, in case you’ve never seen it.

It also contains recommendations how to  improve your PowerPoint.

This following video elaborates on the same theme. It is called “Life after Death by PowerPoint”. Not an appropriate name, because it only magnifies Powerpoints killer-points. You might enjoy it though (if you can put up with the canned laugh).

Below is another presentation about the science of presentations. And although I noticed little science in it, I did find the CEO-presentation interesting because it discusses the use of live tweeting (and blogging) to give “contagious talks” (you know Twitter going “viral”).





Cochrane 2.0 Workshop at the Cochrane Colloquium #CC2009

12 10 2009

Today Chris Mavergames and I held a workshop at the Cochrane Colloquium, entitled:  Web 2.0 for Cochrane (see previous post and abstract of the workshop)

First I gave an introduction into Medicine 2.0 and (thus) Web 2.0. Chris, Web Operations Manager and Information Architect of the Cochrane Collaboration, talked more about which Web 2.0 tools were already used by the Cochrane Collaboration and which Web 2.0 might be useful as such.

We had half an hour for discussion which was easily filled. There was no doubt about the usefulness of Web 2.0 for the Cochrane in this group. Therefore, there was ample room for discussing technical aspects, like:

  • Can you load your RSS feed of a PubMed search in Reference Manager? (According to Chris you can)
  • How can you deal with this lot of information (by following a specific subject, or not too much people – not many updates on a daily basis; you don’t have to follow it all, just pick up the headlines, when you can)
  • Are you involved in a Wiki that is successful? (it appears very difficult to involve people)
  • What happens if people comment or upload picture on facebook (of the Cochrane collaboration) in an appropriate way (Chris: didn’t happen, but you have to check and remove them)
  • How do you follow tweets (we showed Tweetdeckhashtags # and #followfridays)
  • What is the worst thing that happened to you (regarding web 2.0)? Chris and I thought a long time. Chris: that I revealed something that wasn’t officially public yet (though appeared to be o.k.). Me: spam (but I remove it/don’t approve it).
    Later I remembered two better (worse) examples, like the “Clinical Reader” social misbehaviour, a good example of how “branding” should not be done, and sites that publish top 50 and 100 list of bloggers just to get more traffic to their spam websites

Below is my presentation on Slideshare.

The (awful) green blackgound color indicates I went “live” on the web. As a reminder of what I did, I included some screendumps.

The current workshop was just meant to introduce and discuss Medicine 2.0 and Cochrane 2.0.

I hope we have a vivid discussion Wednesday when the plenary lectures deal with Cochrane 2.0.

The answers to my question on Twitter

  1. Why Web 2.0 is useful? (or not)
  2. Why we need Cochrane 2.0? (or not)

can be found on Visibletweets (temporary) and saved as: Quoteurl.com/sggq0 (permanent selection).

I think it would be good when these points are taken into account during the Cochrane 2.0 plenary discussions.

* possible WIKI (+ links) might appear at http://medicine20.wetpaint.com/page/Cochrane+2.0

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Web 2.0 Tools to Inspire … Teachers and others

16 06 2009

Judy O’Connell pointed out an interesting Slideshare presentation called “Web 2.0: Tools to inspire”.

It contains a lot of suggestions, especially in the field of education, like

Apart from the Social Networking Tools, there are many new suggestions. The tools seem particularly useful in the class room or in spare time.

For other free learning tools see a previous post:
Google Reader and other free (learning) tools.

Here is the entire presentation.

** tip of my daughter: http://www.picnik.com/ online photo editing (free)

* my tip: Snag-it (professional screen capture -can’t do without) <





LOCA Congress for Interns – LOCA co-assistenten congres

14 05 2009

movir
Last Sunday I was an invited speaker at a national congress for interns, the LOCA congress. LOCA stands for “Landelijk Overleg Co-Assistenten”.

This congress has been initiated to facilitate the contact between interns of all Dutch universities and to cover in depth subjects that usually don’t get much attention.

The LOCA congress offered a diverse program, varying from “minimal invasive and maximal effective surgery”, “memory training” and “a dirty mind is a joy forever”. You can see the program here (Saturday; Sunday).

The previous event I gave a Search Workshop, this time the subject was “Medicine 2.0″.

I didn’t realize in advance that this wasn’t a convenient day. First it was Mother’s day. My children weren’t pleased that I wouldn’t be around. Furthermore I had to prepare an Evidence Based Searching day the following Monday and several other workshops that week. Still, Sunday morning we spent together in the garden eating home made smoothies and muffins that my eldest daughter L made, with on them in colors: “Mama blog”, “L X M”, “Laika twitter”, “Success”,  etcetera, which illustrates how they see me now.

Despite  that I had 40 min. instead of the expected 60 min., and just about half of the workshop subscribers (it was a very sunny day) showed up, I found it a pleasant workshop. Mostly because the audience was very interested and interactive. Within those 40 minutes, however, I could only touch upon some aspects, giving most emphasis to the web 2.0 tools which can be used in daily practice by medical professionals to find information (social networking sites, RSS also in Pubmed, personalized home pages, blogs and wiki’s)

40 minutes is short and I promised the interns to provide them with some information afterwards.

I’m too busy at the moment with my regular job, but I expect that the promised information will be available within 1-2 weeks at:

But I won’t withhold a series of tweets (Twitter messages)  specifically directed to the interns of this workshop. You can view the tweets labeled with #MOVIR, here at Visibletweets. They have been tweeted by doctors, a patient, a nurse and a physiotherapist. Please see them all, the first tweets are shown last.





Educational Videos about Library Stuff

21 03 2009

Yesterday @alisha alerted me to a post of Sheila Webber at the information-literacy blog about a wonderful series of YouTube videos by Llordllam with hand puppets as actors. The videos are a mix of educational videos aimed at librarians, information scientists and library readers. The leading actors are Goose the librarian and Professor Weasel the academic (patron).

The following YouTube video is really superb as well as hilarous. With a typical british sense of humor it tries to make you understand Academic Copyright. Prof Weasel struggles to understand the problems with the traditional journal publication system. Look how he is fooled by the publisher rat.

And for librarians and librarian users this one is a must. Boolean operators explained. Think the jam/bread example will work better than my epistaxis/child example, so who knows I will adapt my slides.

And finally the video “Your Library: A User Centric Experience”. This feels very familiar (the user becomes the king, see also the Flikr pictures in the side bar of our library)

More video’s of Goose and Weasel see page of llordllama on youtube.com and  a facebook page for fans of the video Randy Weasel, Kooei Goose and others

—-

Now, not a Llordllam/Goose/Weasel production, but a very useful video (by paulrobesonlibrary) to illustrate to students the (unusefulness) of Wikipedia as their primary research tool.
Seen at Phil Bradley’s Weblog (No, you can not lower the speed)





PeRSSonalized Medicine – and its alternatives

27 02 2009

perssonalized_medicineA few posts back I just discussed that Personalized Genetics has not fulfilled its promise yet. But what about PeRSSonalized Medicine, just launched by Bertalan Mesko?

Bertalan Meskó is a medical student from Hungary, who runs the award-winning medical blog Scienceroll. According to the web 2.0 model of Hugh Carpenter, mentioned in a previous post, Bertalan (Berci) just finished his journey as a Web 2.0 jedi: he started a web 2.0 company: Webicina. Webicina offers a personalized set of web 2.0 tools to help medical professionals and patients enter the web 2.0 world.

To be honest I was a bit skeptical at first. When I think of web 2.0, I think of it as *open, *collaborative, *creative commons, *networking, ****collective intelligence (Elizabeth Koch). Web 2.0 exists by the mere fact that people want to share information for free. Later I realized that this initiative is comparable to individualized courses that you have to pay for as well. Webicina will also offer some free tools, especially for patients.

One such free tool is PeRSSonalized Medicine. The RSS in PeRSSonalized Medicine stands for Real Simple Syndication, which is a format for delivering regularly changing web content, i.e. from Journals. PeRSSonalized Medicine is a free tool meant to help those users who cannot spend much time online (e.g. medical professionals). It helps them track medical journals, blogs, news and web 2.0 services really easily and creates one personalized place where they can follow international medical content without having a clue what RSS is about (see post at Scienceroll)

persssonalized-medicine-tabs

PeRSSonalized Medicine has a beautiful and straightforward interface. There are 5 separate sources you can follow: (1) Medical Journals, (2) Blogs, (3) News and (4) Media (including Youtube channels, Friendfeed rooms or Del.icio.us tags), and (5) “articles” in PubMed (to setup this you have to perform a search in a separate toolbar).

The items included are partly of general interest -i.e. the Medical Journals includes 13 titles, including the BMJ, the JAMA and the Lancet-, partly it is very specialized, i.e. on the field of genetics. A lot of Journals are not included and Web 2.0 sources tend to be more represented than the official media/journals.Thus this tool seems most suited for the generalist and people wanting to follow web 2.0 tools. On the other hand – and this is a clear advantage- the content develops as wishes and suggestions are taken into account.

Each Tab can be personalized by simply hiding the titles you don’t want to include (under the button personalize it), but settings are only saved after registration.

The view of the personalized page is pleasant and neat. You see short titles of the 10 latest articles of the sources you have subscribed to. Moving your mouse over the titles will reveal more information and once you clicked the link it turns grey instead of blue. What I miss is the button: more, so you can catch up if you have missed older articles. Especially with media and journals that often have more than 10 new articles per issue, even more so if the first 10 titles consist of “obituaries” (BMJ).

The latest addition to PeRSSonalized Medicine (5) is the possibility to subscribe to a Pubmed search so “you can also follow the latest articles in your field of interest without going back to PubMed again and again and doing a search for your favourite term. Make this process automatic with PeRSSonalized Medicine.”
However, as most of you may know, you don’t have to go back to Pubmed over and over again to “do” your search, but you can easily subscribe to a search in PubMed either by email (My NCBI) or by RSS (see for instance this post in Dutch). Although the process of subscribing is not as intuitive as it is in PeRSSonalized medicine, PubMed is better suited to design a good search strategy. To keep abreast of the latest information in your field a good search forms the basis. It hurts my heart as a librarian that most web 2.0 people are more fixed on the technique of how to subscribe to a feed (RSS) than on good search results. Remember, it still is: garbage in, garbage out. RSS is just the drain.

As an example I show two RSS feeds below, one with more appropriate terms (pulmonary embolism and d-dimer) than the other (lung embolism and d-dimer). Pulmonary embolism is a MeSH. It is evident that with lung embolism articles will be missed just by choosing wrong/less optimal terms.

pubmed-search-rss-toelichting

Again the presentation of results is pleasant. Apart from the search restrictions I don’t find it very handy to look up each paper in HubMed (for that is where the link takes you).
Personally I prefer regular e-mail-alerts at specific intervals (via MyNCBI). I would like to look up citations either individually (if there is just 1 interesting hit) or all at once (10-50 hits). In PubMed, results can be selected, PDF’s directly downloaded from the library website and citations can be kept in My NCBI Collections or imported into a reference manager system. A RSS-feed of Pubmed searches is also handy (see below).

Alternatives

The idea presented on Webicina, although fancy, is not new. Consider the following alternative web tools, also build on data collected from RSS feeds.

Amedeo

Amedeo is dedicated to the free dissemination of medical knowledge. It is an international free service that will send you weekly literature updates in medical subjects of your choosing. At the same time a personalized website is made, with subscriptions to the journals you selected. You can retrieve the articles in text or in HTML-format. The HTML format brings you to the latest results for that Journal in PubMed. This service seems most suitable for specific medical disciplines. General topics (family physician) are not available, although it is possible to subscribe to for instance the American Journal of Family Physicians. As with all these free literature services, you will have to subscribe. It is easy to select or deselect journals in a category (tick boxes).
Amedeo also has Free Books For Doctors, but no podcasts or blogs. You can search the site, but you cannot easily look up individual journals.

amadeo

—————————————————–

emergency-medicine-2x

MedWorm (and LibWorm)

MedWorm is a free medical RSS feed provider as well a a search engine. It is meant both for doctor and patient. There are many medical categories that you can subscribe to, via the free MedWorm online service, or another RSS reader of your choice, such as Google Reader. The number of RSS-feeds is enormous: >6000. There are a publications directory, a blog directory, a blog tag cloud, consumer health news, discussion and several specific topics, like cancers, drugs, vaccines and education. Within the publications directory there is a further subdivision in: Consumer – Info – Journals – News – Organizations – Podcasts.

Many specialties are represented, including primary care and veterinary science. I tried it out and subscribed to some Addison’s disease related topics, Reuter’s Health and my own blog, which has recently been included. When you subcribe via the Medworm-RSS all news can be read in “My River of News”. It shows the titles and part of the abstracts (see Fig. below).

You can subscribe to single items or categories, but it is not possible to in- and exclude individual feeds within a topic or category by a single action. So within Endocrinology I cannot selectively exclude all diabetes journals, but (as far as I can see) I have to subscribe to each individual journal, if I don’t want the whole package. The loading of the River of News takes long, sometimes.

Together with David Rothman the builder/owner of MedWorm, Frankie Dolan, has also launched Libworm, which is a librarian’s version of MedWorm.

medworm2-home-page-favs

DO IT YOURSELF (or let the library do it for you)

Sometimes the library will set up a personalized start page. See for instance the Dermatology page created with Netvibes at the Central Medical Library, University Medical Center Groningen (UMCG). Doesn’t it look beautiful?

groningen-dermatology-netvibes

I-Google

And isn’t the tool below superb looking? Well, I constructed it myself on basis of what Ves Dimov wrote in the post “Make Your Own “Medical Journal” with iGoogle Personalized Page”, he submitted to the first MedLib”s round. And I had a little “life” help from Ves via Twitter, because things have changed a bit. All you need is a free Google mail (G-mail) account, just go to Google.com/IG (or search the web for I-Google) and subscribe. First you can create your start page with all kind of gadgets (like clock, G-mail inbox and weather forecast, see Figure below) and then you can add other tabs (encircled below). The Medical Journal and Journals Tabs I just took from Ves by clicking on the links he gave in his post: RSS feeds of the “Big Five” medical journals (NEJM, JAMA, BMJ, Lancet and Annals) plus 2-3 subpecialty journals and the podcasts of 4 major medical journals in iGoogle.

Once you have these tabs you can edit them (add, delete, move) as you like.

i-google

I-Google Medical Journals Tab

i-google-start-page-shape-top

I-Google Startpage

RSS-readers

All the above tools are based on RSS, which means Real Simple Syndication. It isn’t called Simple for nothing. You can easily do it yourself, which means that you have more freedom in what you subscribe to. Because I-Google doesn’t scale well beyond 50 or so RSS feeds, other RSS-readers are advisable once you subscribe to many different feeds (see Wikipedia for list and comparison) . I use Google-Reader, shown below, for this purpose.

Generally, adding Feeds is easy. In Firefox you often see the orange RSS-logo in the web browser (just click on it to add the feed) and most Journals and blogs have a RSS-button on their page, that enables subscription to their feed.

google-reader

rss-buttons-at-site-in-browser

As detailed in another (Dutch) Post, numerous Pubmed searches can be easily added to your RSS-reader. You build up a good search in Pubmed, for instance: (pulmonary embolism[mh] OR pulmonary embolism* OR lung embolism*) AND (“Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products”[Mesh] OR d-dimer). In “the Results” you click on “Send To” and choose RSS-Feed and add it to your reader. That’s all.

pubmed-rss

Summary

PeRSSonalized Medicine is a free tool which lets you subscribe to a small and rather skewed selection of journals, news, media and blogs and (straightforward) PubMed searches. The strong points of this tool are: the beautiful design, the ease of use for people not used to web 2.0 tools including RSS, and its continuous development, seeking active input from its users. To speak with dr Shock’s: It is meant for a physician who is not web savvy, never heard of RSS and never wants to, not a geek, nerd, and still wants to stay up to date with health 2.0 or medicine 2.0.”

But there are other free tools around with more (subscription) possibilities and with a little more investment of time you can do it yourself and make subscriptions really perssonalized. Once you know it is simple, believe me.

You may also want to read:

http://laikaspoetnik.wordpress.com/2008/05/05/1-may-rss-day/ (about RSS)

http://laikaspoetnik.wordpress.com/2008/02/15/rss-feed-en-pubmed/ (about RSS and Pubmed – Dutch)





The 21st Century Librarian

21 02 2009

In a previous post “You don’t look like a librarian” I shortly described a book dealing with Librarian stereotypes and what can be done to defeat tired old perceptions and create positive new images…

I really liked the comments of Jenny and Creaky, basically confirming that there is something like a librarian “subtype”: “we look like nice people – curious, friendly, social” (Jenny) and “approachable” (Creaky, who is often spontaneously asked for help when she steps into a Border’s or a Barnes & Noble Bookstore.)

However, although THE stereotypical librarian does not really exist any longer in this information age, the picture continues to exist in some people’s mind (Ruth, the author of the book).

21st-century-librarian

Quite coincidentally @AllergyNotes (Ves Dimov) pointed that same day to an article in the New York Times about the “Twenty-First Century Librarian” highlighting that

“librarians are no longer just reshelving books but play a new role in the information age, since technology has brought out a whole new generation of practices.”

The article describes school librarians who connect kids not only with books but also with information. As an example a video is shown of Stephanie Rosalia, a librarian at an elementary school (see below). Stephanie does do the usual librarian things, but also learns kids how to surf the net and how to search databases using boolean operators(!) and she teaches them website literacy. For instance, a completely fake web site is shown to the kids, who have to learn what information they can trust and what information is suspect. They learn what to do when their search for Christopher Columbus yields 99 million returns in Google. “Kids are overwhelmed, they are swimming in an information ocean.. and they’re drowning”. Librarians like Stephanie guide the kids though the flood of information that confronts them on a daily basis.

Really impressive what crucial skills young kids learn these days, at least in the VS*. Yet as school librarians increasingly teach students crucial skills needed not only for school, but also on the job and in daily life, they are often the first casualties of school budget crunches. Certainly with the global recession kicking in.

* I wonder as how far these 21st century school librarians are specific for the US. My kids (elementary and high school) are not trained in web literacy by a school librarian. But I wish they were.

By the way, there is a funny blogpost confirming Ruth’s idea that a few (?) people still think “that librarians, they don’t know nothin’ ’bout them complicated computer thingamajigs” on Caveat Lector by Dorothea Salo (hattip @eagledawg – “Nikki”)





What I learned in 2008 (about Web 2.0)

2 02 2009

Grand Round is a weekly collection of the best writing in the medical blogosphere. The coming Grand Rounds (February 3rd, 2009), hosted by Not Totally Rad has the following theme:

February is the first anniversary of my blog. Therefore, the loose theme for submissions will be anniversary-related: write about something cool or important that you’ve learned in the past year.

Well, I have learned a lot in the past year. The most profound personal experience was the death of my father. I experienced how it is to loose a beloved, but I also learned that death and grieve can affect people so deeply that it changes their behavior. I now understand this behavior (anger, mental confusion) is a manifestation of deep grief, which is transient and natural. Luckily our body and mind appear very resilient.

I will restrict to another thing I’ve learned: Web 2.0.
Just like the “Samurai Radiologist” I started a blog in February 2008. Thus Laika’s MedLibLog also celebrates its first anniversary.

Useful Web 2.0 tools

This blog was started as a tool to communicate thoughts, new found skills and ideas with other (>150) SPOETNIK course members, Spoetnik being a Learning 2.0 project to encourage library staff to experiment and learn about the new and emerging Internet technologies.

During the library 2.0 course I learned the basics of blogging, chatting, RSS, Podcasts, Wiki’s and social bookmarking. Each week another item was addressed. This learning program had a direct and positive impact. For instance, I could inform my clients how to create a RSS-feed for PubMed searches. By taking RSS-feeds/email alerts to interesting blogs, wiki’s and journals I kept better informed.

Hard to imagine (now) that I hardly new anything about web 2.0 one year ago.

Web 2.0 is not just a set of tools.

In the beginning I considered blogging largely as a selfish activity. It also appeared a lonely activity. As long as we discussed a course assignment there always was an interaction with at least a handful of other participants. But as soon as the program came to an end, I started to write more and more about medicine, EBM and medical library related matter, which didn’t appeal to most of the other course members. I wrote about things that interested me, but the writing would be absolutely useless if nobody would read it. Thus, how to get an audience?

There were I few things I had to learn and there were a few people who gave me a push in the right direction .

  • Wowter, who gave feedback to my posts right from the start and who encouraged me to continue blogging, posted a list with 17 tips for beginning bloggers (in Dutch) of how to increase visibility and findability of your blog. I became aware that ‘linking’ to others is what is making the web 2.0 world interconnected.
  • Second Dymphie, a Dutch Medical Librarian, encouraged me to start twittering. It took quite a while before I grasped the value of twitter as a networking tool. Twitter is not meant to say “what you do”, but it is a way to share information of any kind. Before you can share it, you first have to find interesting tweeple (people on twitter) and it did take a while before they followed me back (partly because my first tweets weren’t that interesting). Thus I had to learn by trial and error how to become a prolific twitterer.
  • Third I read a very interesting blogpost on “I’m not a geek” of Hutch Carpenter called Becoming a web 2.0 jedi, showing a simple but very accurate chart of the ever deeper levels of involvement one can have with Web 2.0 apps and the Web 2.0 ethos, as Hutch calls them. “Down are the lower levels, those of passive involvement, level 2 is giving up little pieces of yourself, while level 3 is a much bigger sharing experience. Share your own life, share your knowledge, share the stuff you find interesting. A big leap for a lot of us used to being more private. May the force be with you.”
    Seeing his post I realized that my journey had been quite different (figure below, made in September 2008). During the Spoetnik course emphasis was given to the tools themselves not to the ways you should use and share them and contribute to others. We skipped the reading of blogs and wiki’s, the lurking on twitter, but started with chatting, RSS and blogging. Although Web 2.0 tools are the basis, Web 2.0 is more an attitude than the usage of tools, it is about sharing information and thoughts.Or as Dean Giustini says it: It is about people.

The Ecosphere of Twitter and blogs.

I also experienced that all web 2.0 tools are not stand-alone tools, but can reinforce each other. This is for instance true for RSS, bookmarking tools , blogs, but also twitter (a microblogging service). A recent post of Sandnsurf (Mike Cadogan) at Life in the fast Lane uses a brilliant ecosystem metaphore to describe the twitter-blogging relationship. He describes the blogging ecosphere, where twitter decomposes information from journal articles and long blog posts into readily digestible information (nutrients and humus). See Figure from his post below (but read his post here for the whole story). Just like the Jedi chart this diagram illustrate exactly what web 2.0 is about.

Lessons to be learned

I have learned a lot. Am I now a real web 2.0 Jedi?
I’m not sure. In the ecology-model my blog is a young tree, surrounded by many others. But some ecologic dangers are luring.

  • The relative success of my blog results in “an abundance of light which results in a pressure to keep producing enough good quality posts”.
  • I’ve subscribed to so many RSS-feeds I seldomly read them.
  • I have so many twitter-followers (app. 300) that I can’t keep up with all of them as much as I would like to.
  • I read so many things, but haven’t got the time to work them out (or I simply forget).
  • I find it difficult to separate chaff from wheat. Many blogposts and web 2.0 information are not very accurate and superficial. Furthermore people often echo a subject without careful checking or without adding value.

Or in the words of sandnsurf: the death of a blog can ensue due to excessive exposure and Twittaholism. I hope It will not go in that direction, but I have to figure out a way to coop with the overwhelming amount of information and find a balance. That will be part of my (web 2.0) learning process in 2009.

One other thing:

I forgot to mention one very important experience. During my web 2.0 journey I virtually met many interesting, kind and helpful people from all over the world, from US, UK, Eastern Europe to India and Australia. Closer to home I also ‘met’ many very nice Dutch and Belgian people. I never liked the idea of intentional networking, but in web 2.0 the networks arise spontaneously. In a very natural and gradual way I became a member of a large health and library community and that feels good.

You might also want to read:





Training: ‘Getting The Best Out Of Search Filters’

24 01 2009

Information Specialists, other information professionals and researchers seeking more insight into the usefulness of search filters might be interested in the following training event:

YHEC Training Event: ‘Getting The Best Out Of Search Filters’

University of York, 26 February 09 or UK Cochrane Centre, Oxford, 04 March 09

This training event will explore how to identify, critically appraise and test out search filters, focusing on health and social care.

The training day presenters will be Julie Glanville (Project Director, Information Services, York Health Economics Consortium, University of York) and Carol Lefebvre (Senior Information Specialist at the UK Cochrane Centre).

By the end of the study day, participants will have:

  • An awareness of how to identify published search filters;
  • An understanding of the features of search filter design to be able to critically appraise search filters;
  • An awareness of the key issues to be considered in assessing the suitability of search filtesr for specific questions;
  • An understanding of the challenges of translating search filters between interfaces and databases.

For more information see here To book a place please click here.

An overview of other training events can be found here

Unfortunately, both of these courses are now fully booked. YHEC will be running a further course later in the year (perhaps in November), and they may be running a course in the Netherlands in due course as well. You can contact ab588@york.ac.uk to be put on a mailing list to be kept informed of these courses.





Anatomy Lesson 2008: Living in Fear

30 11 2008

You may want to play this music while reading this post: Bach: Gottes Zeit ist die allerbeste Zeit (BWV 106)

amc-homepage

The “Anatomy Lesson” has several meanings:

  1. A lesson in Anatomy
  2. A famous painting of Rembrandt van Rijn (of Nicolaes Tulp) (1632).
  3. The homepage of the AMC, the Academic Medical Center in Amsterdam, inspired on the painting of Rembrandt.
  4. A yearly symposium at the intersecting plane of medicine, art and society, organized by the AMC and the Volkskrant, a Dutch newspaper.

This year I was invited to the yearly “Anatomische Les” in the concertgebouw, Amsterdam’s beautiful concert hall (see Wikipedia). It is a very official happening. The audience had to take their seats long before the start. It took more than 2 hours without any break.

zaal-concertgebouw-anatomische-les

Anatomy Lesson 2008 in the Concertgebouw

This year’s theme was FEAR. The program was as follows:

  • Welcome – Rinnooy Kan
  • Presentation of new work of art of Albert van Westing (1960), recently bought by the AMC – Wim Pybes, director of the “RijksMuseum”
  • “Mit Freud und Freud ich fahr dahin”- Johan Sebastian Bach. 1.”O Jesu Christ, mein’s Lebens Licht” 2. Gottes zeit ist die allerbeste Zeit – Baroque Ensemble “Follia d’ Amsterdam” together with the choir “Nuovo Musico” , conducted by Gustav Leonhardt (above is another version). The cantatas express both fear for death and faith in God.
  • Audiovisual presentation of the assay ” de vertrouwenscrisis” (what went wrong with the fundamental trust in the Dutch society?), written by 19 different publicists.
  • Audiovisual impression of pupils of Amsterdam High Schools attending lectures in psychiatry: funny and disarming.
  • And the climax: a 50 min lecture of Prof. Arieh Y. Shalev, M.D. (Head Department of Psychiatry at the Hadassah University Hospital of Jerusalem, Israel) about living with fear.

I will try to summarize the main points of Shalev’s lecture as I remember them (no notes).

There are several factors that may influence how people react to fear:

  1. DNA (fixed), inherited differences – (written composition in musical notation)
  2. Epigenetic Mechanisms (mostly but not exclusively determined postnatally). (tuning of the piano, quenching the middle register)
  3. (Gene) Expression (Accordion register determining ranks and timbres, determined by the accordionist)
  4. Exogenous factors (i.e. empathy and affection) (the people singing, the acoustics)

Fear is an emotional response to threats and danger, meant to protect against a threat (fright-fight-or-flight). It is a basic survival mechanism occurring in response to a specific stimulus, such as pain or the threat of pain. Recognizing a person in agony is easy. The facial expression of fear includes the widening of the eyes (out of anticipation for what will happen next); the pupils dilate (to take in more light); the upper lip rises, the brows draw together, and the lips stretch horizontally. Muscles used for physical movement are tightened and primed with oxygen, in preparation for a physical fight-or-flight response. When the stimulus is shocking or abrupt, a common reaction is to protect vulnerable parts of the anatomy, particularly the face and head. When a fear stimulus occurs unexpectedly, the victim of the fear response could possibly jump or give a small start. The person’s heart-rate and heartbeat may quicken (from Wikipedia).

brain-amygdalaThe amygdala, an almond shaped complex of related nuclei, located in the middle of the brain, is a critical processor area for fear. Connected to the hippocampus, it plays a role in emotionally laden memories. It is part of the limbic system.

Fear, begins with arousal. For instance:

  1. You hear a sound. The amygdala is alerted.
  2. You see a face, the amygdala is alerted to a greater extent. Your pupils enlarge, your breathing and hartbeat quicken.
  3. You recognize the face; it is nobody to be afraid of: the fear response is dampened. The heartbeat drops to normal levels, because you are reassured that there was no danger.

But suppose (1) you’re walking in a dark alley and (2) you see a gun. (3) Next you see a man holding that gun. (4) He shouts something threatening. There are no breaks anymore (by prefrontal cortex/hippocampus on the amygdala) and the fear machine starts running at full speed. Thus, in case of a major threat, in a split second all alarm bells ring: the abovementioned reflexes occur immediately and with no point of return.

One’s memory of what happens consists of separate “pictures”: (1) the alley, (2) the gun, (3) the man, (4) a loud voice (and perhaps smell). Normally, moments of fear will takes it’s place along other memories, although this may take some time.

However, depending on the kind of fear, your personality and external factors, memories to the incident causing fear may stay at the foreground. It may become a memory that comes to the mind frequently and spontaneously or evoked by one of the remembered associations. For instance any alley may cause the full blown fear response again in the abovementioned example.

Shalev telling this, I suddenly understood my reactions to a car accident. While driving on the highway, the driver lost control of the vehicle, causing it to skid and finally ending against a huge concrete wall. I was sitting in the back and while the car was turning I saw “the wall hitting us”. My “last thought” was “that was it”. The car was total loss, but luckily all 5 (members of a dancing group) survived. Apparently because of the “fear of death”, the impression of that very moment staid long with me. For almost a year I felt frightened not only in a car, but also when I saw a car or motor turning fast around the corner or when moving sideways in an airplane during landing. It must have been a similar feeling as when the car turned and hit the wall. The resemblance of that moment brought the memory and the fear back in quite un uncontrollable way. But as time passed by, so did this emotional reaction. The memory itself was still there, but at the background and slowly all intense associations with that frightful moment faded.

hapThis is what normally happens with frigtening experiences. Fear can be retriggered by a memory (smell, picture, situation) linked to what happened, but can extinguish over time. Thus responding to a conditioned stimulus (CS) spontaneously recovers with the passage of time indicated that extinction does not erase the conditioned memory, but is a form of (active) inhibition. The brain (prefrontal cortex/hippocampus) learns how to coop with it and suppress the emotional fear reflex (amygdala).

However, some fears don’t extinguish and have a lifelong impact. For instance in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), which is a severe and ongoing emotional reaction to extreme physical or psychological trauma.

Shalev gave several examples of people with PTSD other than PTSD in war veterans . For instance, a mother who lost her daughter on the complications of a simple (and unnecesary) intervention. The daughter died of sepsis and from that moment on the mother continued to live in the past, persistently reexperiencing the traumatic event.

This was what the mother remembers as the most frightful moment:

I entered the door, my hand still holding the knob. There she lied staring with pupils so dilatated that her irisses were no longer visible. Death was inevitably approaching. I wanted to scream for help, but there were no doctors present and nurses were all running around. I could do nothing about it.

That was a recurrent theme in all examples: feeling desparate and helpless while facing the inevitable.

In PTSD patients the normal extinction mechanisms don’t work. PTSD patients remain in a state of arousal.

In a longitudinal MRI study Shalev showed that a smaller hippocampal volume is not a necessary risk factor for developing PTSD and does not occur within 6 months of expressing the disorder, thereby dismissing the widely held belief that the volume of the hippocampus is reduced in PTSD patients . (Bonne O et al. Am J Psychiatry. 2001 Aug;158(8):1248-51. Longitudinal MRI study of hippocampal volume in trauma survivors with PTSD.)

Shalev also emphasized that the mere reiteratation of the traumatic event doesn’t help the patient. If the patient is in fear it doesn’t help to bring him to an alley all over again, and to leave the alley again as soon as the patient gets frightened. This only reinforces fear. What should be done is to learn the patient to associate the alley with positive events through psychotherapy. Trust, empathy, friendship can all help as well.

Because extinction is a form of learning some medical treatments given soon after the trauma will not help to reduce the PTSD. In a Randomized Controlled Trial presented at the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology 46th Annual Meeting (December 8-12, 2007), Shalev and coworkers showed that cognitive therapy or prolonged exposure therapy (a type of cognitive behavioral therapy) within 1 month had a reduced prevalence and severity of PTSD at 5 months to 20%, whereas early treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fared no better than individuals randomized to placebo or spontaneous recovery (wait-list) groups (60%). According to Shalev this is a phantastic effect. (Source: Medscape ).

Still, although cognitive therapy is effective, many PTSD patients remain symptomatic despite initial treatment.
————-

This post was (also) written for next Grand Round hosted by Mexican Medical Student. Enrico had a tentative theme in mind (with some flexibility to change it ;) ) but these words should be applicable: renewal, metamorphosis, change, transformation. Well, this story was about how extreme fear can transform you in another person. Furthermore death, referred to in the Bach cantate, is our ultimate transformation.
Finally I hope that Enrico, being both a medical student and a
classical pianist likes Bach.





Google Reader and other free (learning) tools

27 08 2008

Lee LeFeverLee Le Fever, the founder and principal of the famous Common Craft video’s announced today at Twitter that the Google Reader team had hired Commoncraft to create this one minute introduction to Google Reader. (@leelefever on twitter)

It is an ultrashort but clear presentation in the well-known “Explanations in Plain English style”.

For those not familiar with Google Reader (an RSS-reader), it might be nice to see how this works. If you want to know more about RSS first see this post (again with a CC-video)

From the comments at The Commoncraft-blog I understand that Commoncraft no longer does custom videos. That is a pity. Always fun to look at the commoncraft video’s and I desperately need a very clear short and very plain English language explanation of Feedburner. So Lee, if you have such a backlog in stock??!

The Commoncraft video doesn’t show the new feature of Google Reader, that you can see the average posts per week and the number of subscribers, as I learned today from Gerard Bierens at Twitter. I didn’t see anything at first, but Gerard showed me that you have to look at the Expanded View Tab and click Details (see Figure).

If you’ve taste for more free learning/web2.0 tools, have a look at this 101 Free learning Tools Slide from Zaidlearn. One of the 101 Tools is Google_reader. Each slide has a link to the website where you can get/try the tool. There is more on slideshare and on Zaidlearn’s blog.

This was a tip of @p.f. anderson (on twitter) again, who herself wrote a post about cool toys conversations (which is a kind of minutes of a “very very active Cool Toys Conversation lunch in a strange place far away”) on her blog Emerging Technologies Librarian. Her blog is full of other tips as well.

She is an expert in Second Life, as is the doctor/geneticist Bartalan (Berci) Meskó of Scienceroll. I knew I read an interesting overview today, somewhere, but it took me a while to find it back amidst all other interesting stuff. Here it is: 10-tips-for-how-to-use-web-20-in-medicine, for doctors ànd patients. From second life in the MRI to online registration of blood glucose, blogcarnivals and wiki’s. Well read all 10 Tips I would say.

Last but not least my Belgian colleague Patrick Vanhoucke (again at Twitter) gave the nice tip of a new free music library grooveshark.com, that resembles LastFM, except that it doesn’t stop after 30 seconds. There is even a possibility that you can sell your music via grooveshark (you can load your music and if someone loads it you receive “credits”). The Grooveshark tip was not really a learning tip, but it might make learning somewhat more pleasant. You can read more here (Dutch)





WikiMindMap to Organize Wiki Content

17 08 2008

Wikipedia, has become a rich and complex source of documents linked to each other. When you’re looking for a subject and you follow several links you easily loose the overview.

For instance, when I used wikipedia the other day to gather background information about Mimivirus and the origin of life (for the Sputnik virus-news, see post here), I hip hopped from Mimivirus to Virus to Bacteriophage back to Virus and forth to Life… Origins and Lifeformdebate. Thus, it is not always straight forward to find the information you are really looking for or to keep track of where you are in the sheer bulk of information.

But now there is Wikimindmap. With this free tool you can easily make an overview of the Wiki content on a specific subject. The wikimindmap is inspired by the mindmap technique, a diagram used to represent words, ideas, tasks, or other items linked to and arranged radially around a central key word or idea. Mindmapping is often used to visualize, structure and classify ideas to aid learning.

Below is the wikimindmap for virus.
I choose the English wikipedia to make the wikimindmap. If you typ the plural form “viruses” (which is not the correct entry-term) you see the correct singular form linked to it. By clicking the green arrows you can make “virus” the main topic and you get the full mindmap shown below.

Moving you mouse over boxes, you see more information about the topic groups. Topic groups (+) can be opened by clicking at the boxes. Clicking on the text will bring you to the corresponding position in the Wiki (in a separate tab).

Another nice feature is that you can load the mindmap directly to Freemind (click here to download the software first), a free mind-mapping Java. In Freemind you can edit the mindmap to use it for educating purposes for instance. However you can no longer link to the corresponding wiki-page (without adding the link yourself). My first attempt to make a Freemind mindmap of the virus-wiki is shown below. In fact the end-result is like an organised (non-random) Wordle-graphic (see this post).

Of course you can also use Freemind to create your own mindmaps.

For other mindmapping software see this (Wikipedia) page

Click here to make your own Wikimindmap.

Hattip:
Wikimindmap: gbierens (Gerard Bierens) on twitter tipped TrendMatcher tussen ICT en Onderwijs” - Willem Karssenberg’s: “maak een mindmap van een wikipedia” (Dutch)
Freemind-software: gbierens and librarianbe (Patrick Vanhoucke) on twitter

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Wikipedia is een rijke en complexe bron van allerlei aan elkaar gelinkte pagina’s. Wanneer je aan het zoeken bent en verschillende links volgt kom je al gauw op zijpaden uit en is het moeilijk het overzicht te houden.

Toen ik laatste bijvoorbeeld in Wikipedia wat achtergrondinformatie zocht over mimi- en andere virussen en de definitie van leven (in verband met het Spoetnik virus-nieuws, zie hier voor bericht), hopte ik van Mimivirus naar Virus naar Bacteriophage terug naar Virus and verder naar Life… Origins en Lifeformdebate. Hoe al deze termen samenhangen en hoe je er doorheen bent gewandeld is vaak niet meer duidelijk.

Maar nu is er Wikimindmap. Met deze gratis tool kun je snel en gemakkelijk een overzicht maken van een bepaalde Wiki-inhoud. The wikimindmap is gebaseerd op de mindmap: een grafisch schema (of informatieboom) dat vertrekt van een centraal onderwerp en daaraan bijzaken en verwante concepten linkt. Een mindmap kan bij het studeren helpen details van hoofdzaken te onderscheiden en informatie logisch te ordenen in het geheugen.

Hierboven (engels gedeelte) de wikimindmap voor ‘virus’.
Ik koos de Engelse wikipedia om de wikimindmap te maken. Als je het meervoud “viruses” opgeeft zie je de juiste term, “virus” in enkelvoud ermee verbonden. Door op de groene pijlen te klikken maak je virus tot het centrale thema en krijg de wikimindmap van het figuur hierboven.

Als je met de muis over de rechthoeken schuift, verschijnt er meer informatie over de term. Onderwerpsgroepen kun je open- (+) of dichtklikken (-). Door op de tekst te klikken kom je op de bijbehorende wiki.

Deze wikimindmap kun verder direct downloaden als een Freemind-bestand, dit is een “free mind-mapping software” geschreven in Java. (programmaatje eerst downloaden: klik hier). In Freemind kun je de mindmap verder bewerken, bijv. voor educatieve doeleinden. De hyperlinks naar de wiki’s zijn er dan niet meer, die kun je evt. zelf wel invoeren. Eigenlijk is het resultaat een soort georganiseerde Wordle-grafiek (zie eerdere post).

Natuurlijk kun je Freemind ook gebruiken om je eigen mindmap te maken.

Zie deze Wikipedia pagina voor andere mindmapping software.

Klik hier om je eigen Wikimindmap te maken.

Hattip:
Wikimindmap: gbierens (Gerard Bierens) op twitter verwees naar “TrendMatcher tussen ICT en Onderwijs”Willem Karssenberg: “maak een mindmap van een wikipedia”;
Freemind-software: gbierens en librarianbe (Patrick Vanhoucke) op twitter

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