Health and Science Twitter & Blog Top 50 and 100 Lists. How to Separate the Wheat from the Chaff.

24 04 2012

Recently a Top 100 scientists-Twitter list got viral on Twitter. It was published at accreditedonlinecolleges.com/blog.*

Most people just tweeted “Top 100 Scientists on Twitter”, others were excited to be on the list, a few mentioned the lack of scientist X or discipline Y  in the top 100.

Two scientist noticed something peculiar about the list: @seanmcarroll noticed two fake (!) accounts under “physics” (as later explained these were: @NIMAARKANIHAMED and @Prof_S_Hawking). And @nutsci (having read two posts of mine about spam top 50 or 100 lists [12]) recognized this Twitter list as spam:

It is surprising how easy it (still) is for such spammy Top 50 or 100 Lists to get viral, whereas they only have been published to generate more traffic to the website and/or to earn revenue through click-throughs.

It makes me wonder why well-educated people like scientists and doctors swallow the bait. Don’t they recognize the spam? Do they feel flattered to be on the list, or do they take offence when they (or another person who “deserves” it) aren’t chosen? Or perhaps they just find the list useful and want to share it, without taking a close look?

To help you to recognize and avoid such spammy lists, here are some tips to separate the wheat from the chaff:

  1. Check WHO made the list. Is it from an expert in the field, someone you trust? (and/or someone you like to follow?)
  2. If you don’t know the author in person, check the site which publishes the list (often a “blog”):
    1. Beware if there is no (or little info in the) ABOUT-section.
    2. Beware if the site mainly (only) has these kind of lists or short -very general-blogposts (like 10 ways to….) except when the author is somebody like Darren Rowse aka @ProBlogger [3].
    3. Beware if it is a very general site producing a diversity of very specialised lists (who can be expert in all fields?)
    4. Beware if the website has any of the following (not mutually exclusive) characteristics:
      1. Web addresses like accreditedonlinecolleges.com, onlinecolleges.com, onlinecollegesusa.org,  onlinedegrees.com (watch out com sites anyway)
      2. Websites with a Quick-degree, nursing degree, technician school etc finder
      3. Prominent links at the homepage to Kaplan University, University of Phoenix, Grand Canyon University etc
    5. Reputable sites less likely produce nonsense lists. See for instance this “Women in science blogging”-list published in the Guardian [4].
  3. When the site itself seems ok, check whether the names on the list seem trustworthy and worth a follow. Clearly, lists with fake accounts (other then lists with “top 50 fake accounts” ;)) aren’t worth the bother: apparently the creator didn’t make the effort to verify the accounts and/or hasn’t the capacity to understand the tweets/topic.
  4. Ideally the list should have added value. Meaning that it should be more than a summary of names and copy pasting of the bio or “about” section.
    For instance I have recently been put on a list of onlinecollegesusa.org [b], but the author had just copied the subtitle of my blog: …. a medical librarian and her blog explores the web 2.0 world as it relates to library science and beyond.
    However, sometimes, the added value may just be that the author is a highly recognized expert or opinion leader. For instance this Top Health & Medical Bloggers (& Their Twitter Names) List [5] by the well known health blogger Dean Giustini.
  5. In what way do these lists represent *top* Blogs or Twitter accounts? Are their blogs worth reading and/or their Twitter accounts worth following? A nobel price winner may be a top scientist, but may not necessarily be a good blogger and/or may not have interesting tweets. (personally I know various examples of uninteresting accounts of *celebrities* in health, science and politics)
  6. Beware if you are actively approached and kindly requested to spread the list to your audience. (for this is what they want).It goes like this (watch the impersonal tone):

    Your Blog is being featured!

    Hi There,

    I recently compiled a list of the best librarian blogs, and I wanted to let you know that you made the list! You can find your site linked here: [...]

    If you have any feedback please let me know, or if you think your audience would find any of this information useful, please feel free to share the link. We always appreciate a Facebook Like, a Google +1, a Stumble Upon or even a regular old link back, as we’re trying to increase our readership.

    Thanks again, and have a great day!

While some of the list may be worthwhile in itself, it is best NOT TO LINK TO DOUBTFUL LISTS, thus not  mention them on Twitter, not retweet the lists and not blog about it. For this is what they only want to achieve.

But what if you really find this list interesting?

Here are some tips to find alternatives to these spammy lists (often opposite to above-mentioned words of caution) 

  1. Find posts/lists produced by experts in the field and/or people you trust or like to follow. Their choice of blogs or twitter-accounts (albeit subjective and incomplete) will probably suit you the best. For isn’t this what it is all about?
  2. Especially useful are posts that give you more information about the people on the list. Like this top-10 librarian list by Phil Bradley [6] and the excellent “100+ women healthcare academics” compiled by @amcunningham and @trishgreenhalgh [7].
    Strikingly the reason to create the latter list was that a spammy list not recognized as such (“50 Medical School Professors You Should Be Following On Twitter”  [c])  seemed short on women….
  3. In case of Twitter-accounts:
    1. Check existing Twitter lists of people you find interesting to follow. You can follow the entire lists or just those people you find most interesting.
      Examples: I created a list with people from the EBM-cochrane people & sceptics [8]. Nutritional science grad student @Nutsci has a nutrition-health-science list [9]. The more followers, the more popular the list.
    2. Check interesting conversation partners of people you follow.
    3. Check accounts of people who are often retweeted in the field.
    4. Keep an eye on #FF (#FollowFriday) mentions, where people worth following are highlighted
    5. Check a topic on Listorious. For instance @hrana made a list of Twitter-doctors[10]. There are also scientists-lists (then again, check who made the list and who is on the list. Some health/nutrition lists are really bad if you’re interested in science and not junk)
    6. Worth mentioning are shared lists that are open for edit (so there are many contributors besides the curator). Lists [4] and [7] are examples of crowd sourced lists. Other examples are truly open-to-edit lists using public spreadsheets, like the Top Twitter Doctors[11], created by Dr Ves and  lists for science and bio(medical) journals [12], created by me.
  4. Finally, if you find the spam top 100 list truly helpful, and don’t know too many people in the field, just check out some of the names without linking to the list or spreading the word.

*For obvious reasons I will not hyperlink to these sites, but if you would like to check them, these are the links

[a] accreditedonlinecolleges.com/blog/2012/top-100-scientists-on-twitter

[b] onlinecollegesusa.org/librarian-resources-online

[c] thedegree360.onlinedegrees.com/50-must-follow-medical-school-professors-on-twitter

  1. Beware of Top 50 “Great Tools to Double Check your Doctor” or whatever Lists. (laikaspoetnik.wordpress.com)
  2. Vanity is the Quicksand of Reasoning: Beware of Top 100 and 50 lists! ((laikaspoetnik.wordpress.com)
  3. Google+ Tactics of the Blogging Pros (problogger.net)
  4. “Women in science blogging” by  ( http://www.guardian.co.uk/science)
  5. Top Health & Medical Bloggers (& Their Twitter Names) List (blog.openmedicine.ca)
  6. Top-10 librarian list by Phil Bradley (www.blogs.com/topten)
  7. 100+ women healthcare academics by Annemarie Cunningham/ Trisha Greenhalgh (wishfulthinkinginmedicaleducation.blogspot.com)
  8. Twitter-doctors by @hrana (listorious.com)
  9. EBM-cochrane people & sceptics (Twitter list by @laikas)
  10. Nutrition-health-science (Twitter list by @nutsci)
  11. Open for edit: Top Twitter Doctors arranged by specialty in alphabetical order (Google Spreadsheet by @drves)
  12. TWITTER BIOMEDICAL AND OTHER SCIENTIFIC JOURNALS & MAGAZINES (Google Spreadsheet by @laikas)






Silly Sunday #43 Know Your Numbers

20 11 2011

As I touched upon in Grand Rounds 8.5 the Mayo Clinic Center held the 3rd Social Media’s Health Care Social Media Summit a few weeks ago. Lots of good information and resources were shared, including the video below. The video has already gone viral (it has been viewed appr. 24,000 times), but most important is that its message gets viral.

The song is a parody of 867-5309/Jenny, produced by the Mayo Clinic Center* to promote healthy heart awareness, especially among women:

Heart disease is the number one killer of men and women, but most women aren’t aware of this.

You need to know your numbers, don’t let them get too highblood pressure, lipids and BMI

I love it & remember, know your numbers!

Go to http://knowyournumbers.me/ to calculate your heart risk (BMI and LDL-cholesterol) and see how you can lower it.

You can become a fan of Mayo Clinic at Facebook:
http://www.facebook.com/MayoClinic

* For this purpose, the band of Ron Menaker, the administrator for the Mayo Clinic Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, was renamed to “Tommy and the Heartbeats” (see The  Making of  Know Your Numbers) .

Hattip: Scott Hensley (Facebook)





FDA to Regulate Genetic Testing by DTC-Companies Like 23andMe

14 06 2010

Direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing refers to genetic tests that are marketed directly to consumers via television, print advertisements, or the Internet. This form of testing, which is also known as at-home genetic testing, provides access to a person’s genetic information without necessarily involving a doctor or insurance company in the process. [definition from NLM’s Genetic Home Reference Handbook]

Almost two years ago I wrote about 23andMe (23andMe: 23notMe, not yet),  a well known DTC company, that offers a genetics scan (SNP-genotyping) to the public ‘for research’, ‘for education’ and ‘for fun’:

“Formally 23andMe denies there is a diagnostic purpose (in part, surely, because the company doesn’t want to antagonize the FDA, which strictly regulates diagnostic testing for disease). However, 23andme does give information on your risk profile for certain diseases, including Parkinson”

In another post Personalized Genetics: Too Soon, Too Little? I summarized an editorial by Ioannides on the topic. His (and my) conclusion was that “the promise of personalized genetic prediction may be exaggerated and premature”. The most important issue is that predictive power to individualize risks is relatively weak. Ioannidis emphasized that despite the poor evidence, direct to consumer genetic testing has already begun and is here to stay. He proposed several safeguards, including transparent and thorough reporting, unbiased continuous synthesis and grading of the evidence and alerting the public that most genetic tests have not yet been shown to be clinically useful.

And now these “precautionary measures” actually seem to happen.
Last week the FDA sent 5 DTC-companies, including 23andMe a letter saying “their tests are medical devices that must receive regulatory approval before they can be marketed.” (ie. see NY-times article).

Alberto Gutierrez, who leads diagnostic test regulation at the FDA, wrote in the letters:

“Premarket review allows for an independent and unbiased assessment of a diagnostic test’s ability to generate test results that can reliably be used to support good health care decisions,”

These letters are part of an initiative to better explain the FDA’s actions by providing information that supports clinical medicine, biomedical innovation, and public health,” (May 19 New England Journal of Medicine commentary, source: see AMED-news)

Although it doesn’t look like the tests will be taken from the market, 23andMe does take a quite a rebellious attitude: one of its directors called the FDA “appallingly paternalistic.”

Many support this view: “people have the right to know their own genetic make-up”, so to say. Furthermore as discussed above, 23andMe denies that their genetic scans are meant for diagnosis.

In my view the latter is largely untrue. At least 23andMe suggests that knowing a scan does tell you something about your risks for certain diseases.
However, the risks are often not that straightforward. You just can’t “measure” the risk of a multifactorial disease like diabetes by “scanning” a few weakly predisposing  genes. Often the results are given in relative risk, which is highly confusing. In her TED-talk the 23andMe director Anne Wojcicki said her husband Sergey Brin (Google), had a 50% chance of getting Parkinson, but his relative risk (RR, based on the LRRK2-mutation, which isn’t the most crucial gene for getting Parkinson) varies from 20% to 80% , which means that this mutation increases his absolute risk of getting Parkinson from 2-5% (normal chance) to 4-10% at the most. (see this post).

Furthermore, as reported by Venture in Nature (October 8, 2009): For seven diseases, 50% or less of the predictions of two companies agreed across five individuals (i.e. for one disease: 23andMe : RR 4.02, and Navigenics RR: 1.25). On the other hand *fun* diagnoses could lead to serious concern in, or wrong/unnecessary decisions (removal of ovaries, changing drug doses) by patients.

There are also concerns with regard to their good-practice standards, as 23andMe just flipped a 96-wells plate of costumer DNA (see Genetic Future for a balanced post), which upset a mother noticing that her son didn’t have compatible genes. But lets assume that proper precautions will prevent this to happen again.

There are also positive aspects: results of a preliminary study showed that people who find out they have high genetic risk for cardiovascular disease are more likely to change their diet and exercise patterns than are those who learn they have a high risk from family history. (Technology ReviewGenetic Testing Can Change Behavior).

Furthermore, people buy those tests themselves and, indeed, there genes are their own.

However, I agree with Dr. Gutierrez of the FDA saying: “We really don’t have any issues with denying people information. We just want to make sure the information they are given is correct. (NY-Times). The FDA is putting the consumers first.

However, it will be very difficult to be consistent. What about total body scans in normal healthy people, detecting innocent incidentilomas? Or what about the controversial XMRV-tests offered by the Whittemore Peterson Institute (WPI) directly to CFS- patients? (see these posts) And one step further (although not in the diagnostic field): the ineffective CAM/homeopathic products sold over the counter?

I wouldn’t mind if these tests/products would be held up to the light. Consumers should not be misled by the results of unproven or invalid tests, and where needed should be offered the guidance of a healthcare provider.

But if tests are valid and risk predictions correct, it is up to the “consumer” if he/she wants to purchase such a test.

—————–

What Five FDA Letters Mean for the Future of DTC Genetic Testingat Genomics law Report is highly recommendable, but couldn’t be accessed while writing the post.

[Added: 2010-06-14 13.10]

  • Problem assessing Genomics Law Report is resolved.
  • Also recommendable: the post “FDA to regulate genetic tests as “devices”” at PHG Foundation. This post highlights that simply trying to classify the complete genomic testing service as “a device” is inadequate and will not address the difficult issues at hand. One of the biggest issues is that, while classifying DTC genetics tests as devices is certainly appropriate for assessing their analytical validity and direct safety, it does not and cannot provide an assessment of the service, thus of the predictions and interpretations resulting from the genome scans.  Although standard medical testing has traditionally been overseen by professional medical bodies, the current genomic risk profiling tests are simply not good enough to be used by health care services. (see post)
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Health Care Reform 2010- Obama, USA, Bill, Dutch, Plan, Doctors, Letterman, Pills, $ & other Random Thoughts

30 03 2010

“I do believe the only way we can end all preventable deaths and the suffering of millions is to provide decent health care to all.”
Hilary Benn, 2006
———————

The next Grand Rounds will be hosted by Evan Falchuk at SEE FIRST (Insights into the Uncertain World of Healthcare).  Evan’s theme is Health Care Reform.

How will it affect your life, your medical practice, your experience as a patient, as an insured, an employer, an employee, someone without insurance?  What are your reactions to the politics, and what do you think will happen next?  I’m asking for your candid views on health care reform seen from whatever perspective you bring.  Medicine, politics, business, humor, left, right, center, up, down, you name it.

Health Care Reform has been a theme more than once in this Grand Rounds, i.e. February 10th at the Health Care Blog, and at Obama’s inauguration day (Ten Suggestions For Healthcare Reform) by Val Jones, MD.

The question is which health care reform? Because after all, this is an international Grand Round with bloggers from the US, Europe, Africa, Australia & Asia.
Probably, just as Google.nl (Dutch) already suggests the theme is meant to be about the USA health care bill of Obama, the future plan, and its costs (see Google Fig).

Since I’m from the Netherlands my non-US readers probably need an introduction first:

Recently  the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (known as the “Senate bill”) became law on March 23, 2010 and was shortly thereafter amended by the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 and passed by both houses on March 25 without any support from republicans (source: Wikipedia).  Please see Reuters and CNN for an overview of the March 2010 reforms and the year in which they take effect  and the New York Times [1] for the effect per types of household (i.e. Fig. at the right)

The legislation will tighten regulation of insurance companies and is expected to extend medical coverage to more than 30 million uninsured Americans. As explained by Barack Obama in the CNN-video [2] below, it will take 4 years to implement fully may of these reforms, but some desperately needed reforms will take effect right away.  For instance, having a child with a pre-existing medical condition will no longer be the basis for denial of coverage or higher premiums in the old system.


more about “Health Care:What happens when”, posted with vodpod

As a Dutch citizen, I simply can’t imagine that an insurance would be refused because my girl has asthma and I would to have pay a lot more because I happen to have a chronic disease. I can’t imagine that so many people (from a rich country) are uninsured.

As of January 2006 Our Dutch Health Care has been reformed as well. (Officially) there is no longer a fragmented system with compulsory social insurance for the majority and private health care insurance for people with a higher income. Now there is a standard insurance for all, where the insurers have to accept all patients, with no difference in premium, and no surcharges. Children up to the age of 18 years are insured for free.
Both employer and  government will contribute to the Health Insurance fund, and the insured will pay a nominal premium for their standard insurance directly to the health insurer. People with a low income can apply for a care allowance.
To avoid that health insurers seek to avoid less healthy clients, insurers are entitled to compensation for expensive customers. Although not as ideal as conveyed by the Dutch Government in their commercial-like video [3] (a too central role for the insurers, considerably less covered by the basic health insurance) it still is a pretty good and affordable health care system.

more about “MinVWS | The new health care system i…“, posted with vodpod [press T for English translation]

It is often difficult to imagine how things work in another country unless you’ve been there or hear it through somebody else.

A Dutch correspondent in the US, Tom-Jan Meeus wrote a eye-opening article in the Dutch NRC newspaper [4] about the US health care.

When Meeus collected his first prescriptions from a US pharmacy, he had to pay six times as much for the same pills (same brand, logo, packing) as in the Netherlands. And he was even more surprised that the prices were negotiable. But he got used to the US health care system: he gets an expensive check-up each 2 months instead of the once yearly (when needed) doctor visit back in Holland. In this way his doctor safeguards himself against health insurance claims. Furthermore, his doctor “has to keep the pot boiling too”.
This man knows many influential people and has valuable inside information, i.e. about the health status (botox, psychoses) of some of the key players in the health care system. In addition, he was one of the doctors who thwarted Clintons Health Reform: his glory years. This friendly conservative doctor wants freedom of choice, for himself and his patients. When Meeus objects that this freedom of choice becomes a little expensive, the doctor argues that top health care costs a little (US doctors know they are “the best in the world”)  and continues: “do you really think the health care becomes any cheaper when Obama subsidizes 30 million people to get insured? Hanky Panky, that is what it is.” But he knows a way to circumvent the rules. He cut the ties with two insurance companies that reimburse too little. “Perhaps, we can’t stop Obama, but we can undermine him. Why should we help people when we don’t make money out of it…”.

Hopefully not all the doctors think this way (I’m sure the blogging doctors that I know, don’t), but lets give a moments thought to two statements: That the US Healthcare is “the best” (as it is) and that the new health care system costs too much.

We first have to find out whether the money was well spend before the health care renewal.

I’ve shown the figures before (see [5] and [6]), but here are some other representations.

1. According to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), the US spent 15.3 percent of its GDP on health care in 2006 and this number is rising. As you can see this is far more than the other countries spend.

This trend was already visible in the early eighties: the last 10-20 years the US spend far more money on health care than other rich countries..


And although the U.S. Medicare coverage of prescription drugs began in 2006, most patented prescription drugs are more costly in the U.S. than in most other countries. Factors involved are the absence of government price controls (Wikipedia).

Perhaps, surprisingly, the higher health expenditure hasn’t lead o a higher life expectancy. (78 years in the US versus 82 years in Japan in 2007). The differences are huge if one plots health spending per capita against life expectancy at birth.

Just like the international comparison, higher health care expenditures in different parts of America don’t result in a better health care for all this extra spending. Miami spends 3 times as much money per person health care than Salem (Oregon). Many doctors in Miami, for instance, perform a bunch of tests, like ECG’s, after chest complaints, because they have the necessary devices, not because all these tests have proven useful. Despite all expensive tests and treatments, Miami (and comparable great spenders)  has the worst death rate following a heart attack.* [ source, video in ref 5 and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development’s Health Data 2009 site.]

And this is how the US health care works:  simply more treatments and tests are available, but the incentives are wrong: physicians are paid for the quantity of care not the quality.

Just like the doctor of Tom-Jan Meeus, who did a two-monthly unnecessary check-up.

Or as the internist Lisa Bernstein suggests in the New York Times [7]:

For instance, if an asymptomatic, otherwise healthy, patient comes to me wanting a whole-body CT scan to make sure they do not have something bad hiding inside of them, I would decline and educate him or her that there is no data to show that this test has any significant benefit to offset the potential radiation or other harm and the major medical societies do not recommend this test.”

Mind you this is the situation before the current health care reform.

But there is another thing not yet addressed: the expectations of the US-citizens. Americans (and more and more Europeans too) want those check-ups and screenings, because it gives them a (false) feeling of security and because they feel they have the right. That is why it is so difficult for people to give up unnecessary CT-scans, PSA-screening and mammograms.

One reason why Americans have a higher risk for certain diseases (diabetes, overweight, cardiovascular diseases) might be their lifestyle. And lifestyle is something you can change to a certain extent and can have great effects on your health. Lifestyle is also something you can learn. You can learn to enjoy good food, you can avoid the 3 times daily coca cola  and it can be fun to do some exercise or for children to play outside. But still some people rather have a pill to stay healthy or  undergo all kind of (poor performing) tests to see how they’re doing.

Am I exaggerating?

No. This is reality. A few days ago. I saw Letterman in his show [8] telling Jamie Oliver (on his crusade to change the US diet habits) that “he believed diet pills were the only successful way to lose weight in the U.S. and that he expected humans to ‘evolve to the point where 1,000 years from now we all weigh 500-600lbs and it will be OK’ and that “If you would go to doctor they would be happy to give you as many pills as you need and you weight 80 pounds”

Do I fail to see Lettermans warped sense of humor?

Does he really belief this? And, more important, does the majority of Americans believe this?

For here is much to gain, both in health and health care costs.

* As far as I can tell these are only associations; other possible reasons are not taken into consideration: busy live in a metropolis or the population composition might also play a role.

Main References (all accessed 29 March 2010)

  1. NY-Times (2010/03/24) How Different Types of People Will Be Affected by the Health Care Overhaul.
  2. CNN.com (2010/03/23) Health care timeline (including video)
  3. Ministerie van VWS: The new health care system in the Netherlands
  4. NRC (2010/03/20) Tom-Jan Meeus: Mijn dokter won ook van Clinton (Dutch; subscription required).
  5. Laika’s MedLibLog (2009/09/10) Visualization of  paradoxes behind US Health Care.
  6. Laika’s MedLibLog (2009/09/25) Friday Foolery [4]: Maps & Mapping.
  7. NY Times.com (2010/03/27) health/27patient.html?src=twt&twt=nytimeshealth.
  8. The dail Mail UK (Last updated 210-03-25). Simon Cable. Don’t cry Jamie! Now David Letterman lectures Oliver and says his healthy eating crusade won’t work in America

Photo Credits

This map shows the ability of the health service of each territory to provide good basic health care to a number of people. The health service quality score for 1997 was applied to the population. The world average score for health service quality was 72 out of 100. This means that the equivalent of 4.5 billion people had access to good basic health care.The populations with the poorest health care provision live in Sierra Leone and the Central African Republic. The Sierra Leonean health system scored 36 out of 100 – that is half the world average score. Note that only the most basic care is measured here.
“I do believe the only way we can end all preventable deaths and the suffering of millions is to provide decent health care to all.” Hilary Benn, 2006 Territory size shows the proportion of people worldwide who receive good basic health care that live there.




Haiti still needs help

21 01 2010

Usually, I don’t grant requests for help “to get the word out”. But I will make an exception for a good cause: Haiti.

You could help Haiti by supporting the International Medical Corps (IMC).

The IMC is a global, humanitarian, nonprofit organization, founded by volunteer doctors and nurses in 1984 and dedicated to saving lives and relieving suffering through relief and development programs. Their emergency response team is in Haiti responding in force, but there are still thousands of patients seeking treatment of which approximately 80% are in need of surgery and are running out of time – especially with the tremendous aftershocks still devastating this country. The team is treating crush injuries, trauma, substantial wound care, shock and other critical cases with the few available supplies – And they’re in it for the long haul.

You can help by donating funds, volunteering in Haiti, or just spreading the word (i.e. putting a widget on your site or or Tweeting this )

Want to know more about IMC’s rescue efforts, see:  http://www.imcworldwide.org/haiti

Here you can also donate to help people of Haiti.

Donating $10 to help the people of Haiti is as simple as sending a text message of the word “haiti” to 85944. But other ways are also possible, i.e. click on the red widget on the left.

Importantly, IMC is highly efficient as 92% of their resources go directly to program activities.

————————————
Nederlanders kunnen ook deze internationale organisatie ondersteunen.

Daarnaast kunt ook terecht bij het oude vertrouwde noodhulp gironummer 555, dat nu speciaal opengesteld is voor Haiti (zie bijvoorbeeld NRC-next). U steunt daarmee wel andere organisaties, die noodhulp geven.

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My Little Golden Llama

23 11 2009

Doctor Rob send me
A little golden Llama
Prestigious Price

I did not earn it
by spitting acid musings*
Just wrote this haiku:

Dark when he leaves home,
Dark when he returns from work.
Resident Life.**

Introduced by Rob of Musings of a Distractible Mind as follows:

The final haiku I’m presenting
That Limpens gal who’s unrelenting
She wrote a whole post
But what touched me most
The hours of a life residenting
(5)

Want to read dr Rob’s entire Llamerick  and the haikus of the other price winners, then read this post.

The entire golden pre-selection is mentioned here.

* I now understand this has two meanings ;)
** As indicated in the original post the abovementioned haiku was I
nspired by a tweet by Scott Greenberg, MD

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Health Care Haikus

5 11 2009

Dr Rob Lamberts of Musings of a Distractible Mind is holding a “Health Care Haiku Contest“. The actual contest is at his Facebook page.

Inspired by the beautiful haiku of Dr. Ramona Bates of Suture for a Living, who also inspired T of Notes of an Anesthesioboist to write a Haiku, I started to write my own. Once I started writing, I couldn’t stop.

This is the result: 9 Health Care Haikus.


Haiku #11018284405_db0b517f24 emergency hospital night

Dark when he leaves home,

Dark when he returns from work.

Resident Life.


Haiku #2

Web 2 point ooh tools,

Might help to reform health care.

Change needs people 2.78244074WM004_Supreme_Court


Haiku #3

Health Care Reform.

An unaffordable plan?

A matter of choice.


Haiku #4

One trillion for war.

The poor denied insurance.

U.S. Death Panel.


2910025091_907be70e41 Exam

Haiku #5

P S A screening,

rectal exams, biopsies.

Worries, no less deaths.


Haiku #6

Doctor, Desk, Patient

2868594277_873f67216d doctor patient mural

Questions, silence, not understood,

Frown, shake hands, such pain.


Haiku #7

Fragile hands, white sheets,

Witty old man, nurses laugh.

Shout down silent tears.


Haiku #82898004506_de9f57e836 patient in the next bed

Wishing he was dead,

Paralyzed from neck down,

Nothing he can do.


Haiku #9

The man next to me

discusses end-of-life-wish.

Curtains are closed.


Notes and Acknowledgements

  • Haiku #1 : Inspired by a tweet by Scott Greenberg, MD (and resident)
  • Haiku #2: Own experience, Web 2.0 is more than web 2.0 tools, Web 2.0 is people (see presentation)
  • Haiku #3 and #4: Based on article: “We Can’t Afford Health Care? You Lie!” at Truthorg. (see linked photo below)
  • Haiku #5 A lot of money goes into screening. But is it worth while? Recent studies show that prostate cancer screening may not lower mortality. See older post: Still Confusion about the Usefulness of PSA-screening.
  • Haiku #6, #7, #8, #9 All about loneliness of patients, miscommunication, the lack of being in control and the lack of privacy. Haiku #8 and #9 are based on my own experience: the man lying next to me wanted to end his life, but was not allowed to. He had to take fluid food. I overheard the conversations between him and his doctors, nurses, a psychiatrist, a dietitian and a priest. Quite embarrassing.

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