BlogWorld Expo [SOTB]: Two Additional Videos

25 10 2009

s739843689_121258_9975 dr valToday I learned there were two more videos realted to the BlogWorld Expo, that I shouldn’t withhold you.

First, the ABC News Covered the Medblogger Track At Blog World Expo. Here is an interview with Dr. Val Jones with Dave Lucas of ABC.

The video “Medical Bloggers On ABC News: Empowering Patients With Accurate Information” is summarized as follows at her blog Get Better Health:

….”Dave Lucas is tired of all the false health information that fills his email inbox each day. He’s very relieved that there are physicians, nurses, and patient advocates “swimming against the tide” of pseudoscience and misleading health information online. Today Dave and I discussed how people can find accurate and potentially life-saving health information through peer-reviewed medical blogs, thanks to the health blogger code of ethics (administered by MedPage Today)”.

Another interview was with Paul Levy, President and CEO of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, and author of Running a Hospital. Paul participated in a panel discussion as part of the Medblogger Track (co-sponsored by Johnson & Johnson and MedPage Today). Because the video is barely audible, I just mention his main statements (highlighted in red in the video shown here at the JNJ Health Channel):

  • Paul writes his blogposts without any prior permission or approval process
  • It is quicker to fix a mistake on a blog, than it is in traditional media
  • Biggest regret is responding to sarcastic or hostile comments in kind instead of staying above the fray

Medical Bloggers On ABC News: Empowering Patients With Accurate Information

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]




MEDLIB’s ROUND 1.6

27 09 2009

shht-librarian-costume1Welcome to the sixth edition of MedLib’s Round, a blog carnival of “excellent blog posts in the field of medical librarianship”.

First I have to apologize for the postponement in publication. There were so few submissions (5, including one on this blog), that I needed more time to find some material myself. Time that I didn’t have at that moment.

After a flying start with many volunteering hosts and submissions the enthusiasm for the Medlib’s Round seems to have faded somewhat. There are far less submissions. Luckily there is a core of  enthusiastic people regularly submitting to the Medlib’s Round and I’m very grateful for that. However, there are many more bloggers out there, who also write very useful MedLib stuff. Why aren’t they contributing? Are they not aware of the round, do they lack time, don’t they like blog carnivals? Should the rounds be better promoted or differently organized? I know that postponement does the round no good, but it is a bit the chicken-and-egg problem. Anyway, I would like to hear your thoughts on this.

But lets start…..

Social Media

A previous host and regular contributor to the round, Nikki Dettmar (@eagledagw) of the Eagle Dawg Blog makes a good point in  “Social Media & Emergency Preparedness: Can Your Family Text?”: “Does your family know to text when there is an emergency? Traditional phone lines may be down and traditional methods of communication may not be working.” Learn about an upcoming drill conducted by a national safety foundation and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) over the next few months to use texting and social media channels for emergency communication. And don’t forget to instruct your mother. By the way, the use of Twitter is included in the advise.

Another regular contributor to the Medlib’s round is Ves Dimov (@DrVes). Dr. Dimov is an Allergy and Immunology Fellow at Creighton University and the author of the Clinical Cases and Images – Blog. Blogging for several years and with more than 7000 RSS readers we can trust him for some good advice on blogging In What makes a blogger go on in a field where so many others stop, fail and disappear?” Dr Ves shortly gives 4 reasons and several tips from his own experience.

Google Health

Alisha

Speaking about blogging, it is only a half year ago that Alisha Miles (@alisha764) started with her blog Alisha 764 saying: “I am no longer a mushroom, I am now a tree.” Which refers to @sandnsurf‘s post: Is Twitter the essential blogging nutrient and his comment on my blog: “the most important thing is that you are actually a tree in this ecosystem, you are out there experimenting, thinking and trying to drive the revolution further…Most of my colleagues are still mushrooms….
Alisha, who is a contributor to this round from the start, has definitely developed into a full blossoming tree, a top librarian blogger and tweeter,  She is featured, for instance, in Novoseek’s top 10 medical librarian list (as all current librarian submitters with a public blog).
Her submitted post is a classical post already. It is quite long (hear, hear who is saying) but offers good information. In “Google Health® Information: Surprising Facts” she describes the pros and cons of Google Health®, concluding:

“It is a good product; however, it should be used with caution. Remember Google Health® is not bound by HIPPA, resources should always be double or triple checked, the Google® Health Drug Interaction program is missing some key interactions, and the Google Health® Topics are missing the reference section, reviewer information, and date stamp.

Again, I applaud Google® for its efforts and for including links to MedlinePlus® as a trusted resource. As with any information source, even MedlinePlus®, all information should be checked against at least 1 other source.”

With regard to MedlinePlus and Google, Rachel Walden wrote a post: “Where is MedlinePlus in Google Drug Search Results?” where she notices that Google searches for drug information no longer seem to return results from MedlinePlus and FDA pages.

PubMed, MeSH and the like

Rachel

Rachel Walden (@rachel_w on Twitter) is the woman behind the successful blog Women’s Health News and writer for Our bodies ourselves. She not only knows a lot about women’s health and medical information, but she is always ready to reach a helping hand or join a discussion on Twitter, which is actually a quality of all MEDLIB round contributors.  In “Improving the Findability of Evidence & Literature on DoulasRachel describes  the lack of a specific MeSH for “Doula” in PubMed. A doula is an assistant who provides various forms of non-medical and non-midwifery support (physical and emotional) in the childbirth process. MeSH (or Medical Subject Headings) are controlled terms in MEDLINE, or as explained by Rachel:

MeSH are “right” terms to use to conduct a literature search in PubMed, it can really help to start with the MeSH term database, because you know those are the official subject terms being assigned to the articles. MeSH is a hierarchy, and it can help you focus a search, or expand it when needed, by moving up and down the list of subject words. It’s a nice tool to have, when it works.

As highlighted by Rachel, this gap in the MeSH makes searching less efficient and less precise: for instance, nursing and midwivery are too broad terms. But instead of whining, Rachel decided to do something about it. Via this form she send the National Library of Medicine a request to add the “doula” concept to the MeSH terms. I would recommend others to do the same when terms they search for are not (appropriately) covered by the MESH.

Librarian Mark Rabnett agrees hartfully with Rachel as he has encountered exactly the problems and yes, “there is no question that this is a satisfactorily distinct and widely accepted term, and its entry into the MeSH pantheon is long overdue.”
On his blog Gossypobima Mark had earlier posted the “Top 5 results to improve PubMedfrom the brainstorming suggestions during the Canadian Health Libraries Association conference. These include “Adding adjacency and real string searching” (YES!) and “Improval of the MeSH database”. His group found “The MeSH database stiff and laboured , and the visual display of the thesaurus and subheadings not intuitive, the ‘Add To’ feature for inserting MeSH terms to a search box kludgy, and the searching for MeSH headings difficult and unpredictable. [..] So he concludes with: “We need a MeSH mashup.”

Wouldn’t that be wonderful indeed? Rather than the current “enhancements”, why not introduce some web 2.0 tools in PubMed? As Patricia Anderson tweeted a long time ago:

“It would be so cool to do a # search, then display word cloud of top major MESH terms in results.”

Yes I would like a visual MeSH, but even better, one that would show up in the sidebar and that you would be able to “walk up and down (and sideways) and with “drag and drop to your search possibilities”. That would be cool. My imagination runs away with me when I think of it.

Grey Literature

cappadocia1_bigger shamshaNot having a public blog @shamsha has contributed to this round by writing a guest post on this blog. This interesting post is about grey literature: what is grey literature, why do you need it and why not have guidelines for searching grey literature? She gives many tips and a wealth of references, including links to her own delicious page and a wonderful resource from the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health.

**********************************************************************************

This concludes the official part of this MEDLIB’s September round.

The next round is hosted by Alisha Miles on her blog Alisha 764.
Officially the deadline is next Saturday
. (But it may be postponed a little. If so I will post the new deadline here)
Anyway, Alisha is looking forward to your posts. So send them in as soon as possible HERE at the Blog Carnival form.
(registration required; see the medlibs-archive for more information.
)

And some good news about the round: We already have hosts for November and December, namely Walter Jessen of Highlight Health and Valentin Vivier of at the Novoseek Blog.

Would you like to host the Medlibs round in 2010? It is never to early! Please dm me at twitter, comment on this post or write an email to laika.spoetnik@gmail.com.

**********************************************************************************

Bonus

Here are some other posts I also found worth while to read.
(I didn’t include too recent ones, so they can be included in the next round)

Dr Mike Cadogan (@Sandnsurf) writes  frequently about medical information on his blog Life in the fast Lane (his blog has moved to http://lifeinthefastlane.com, so check out old links that you may have). One of the co-authors of the blog,  Chris Nickson (precordialthump) gives emergency physicians advise how to deal withinformation-overload”. Needless to say the tips are useful to all people dealing with medical information-overload.

Dr Shock also writes a lot about medical information and web 2.0 tools. Here a video he posted about iPhone and iPod Touch as a Medical Tool.

Another good source for info about i-phones, palms can be found on http://palmdoc.net/. Medical librarians frequently writing about this subject include the Krafty Librarian and David Rothman.

I don’t have a palm or sophisticated phone, nor does our library supports its use, so I choose some other posts from these excellent bloggers.

From the KraftyLibrarian Michelle: Rapid Research about Rapid Research Notes , a new resource developed by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) to quickly disseminate the research results to the public in an open access archive. Michelle wonders why only PLOS-articles are included and not other quality information from for instance EBSCO and Cochrane.

From palmdoc : Evernote as your peripheral brain (Evernote is a note taking application)

Rapid Research Notes is also covered by Alison of Dragonfly, a previous host of the round. She also mentions the fact that Medlineplus is now on Twitter.

David Rothman ‘s paternity leave seems over since he posts several interesting posts per week on his blog Davidrothman.net. Typically he shortly refers to a new tool or a post he encountered, like:

Dean Giustini of the The Search Principle blog published part one of a Top Fifty Twitter Users List in Medicine and has written a post on Using Twitter to manage information.

Patricia Anderson of Emerging Technologies Librarian is been very active lately with posts on social media, like “Conversation and Context in Social Media (Cautionary Tales)“, with four scenarios, including the Clinical Reader fiasco. And as always she has a lot of tips on web 2.0 tools. There is for instance a post on Listening Tools to track what your community is saying about you or to you and about Social Media Metrics

Another techy librarian working at the National University of Singapore is Aaron Tay. Aaron Tay (@aarontay) is not working in the field of medicine, but his web 2.0 tips are useful for anyone, and his blog Musings about Librarianship is certainly a must for libraries that want to use web  2.0 tools to the benefit of their users. Personally, I found the tips onViewing research alerts – full text within Google reader very useful.

Phil Bradley highlights Google Fast Flip and Bing’s Visual Search.

Alan from The health Informaticist discusses in “NHS Evidence boo vs guidelinesfinder hurrah” that a simple search for backpain in NHS Evidence yielded 1320 hits (!) of which only a handful are useful guidelines, whereas the good old Guidelines Finder (now a ’specialist collection’), yields 47 mostly useful and relevant hits. He ends this discussion with a  request to NICE: please keep the specialist collections. And I agree.

On EBM and Clinical Support Librarians@UCHC this month an overview of current news, advisories and practical information about Pandemic Flu (H1N1) .

Related articles by Zemanta

his imagination had run away
Reblog this post [with Zemanta]




First Anniversary of this Blog

7 02 2009

118424928_1dabcac6fd

This week is my one year anniversary.

I would like to thank all my readers for following along with my blog.

Thanks for your encouragements, comments and inspiration.

I’m glad I entered the web 2.0 world, but it would have been empty without you.

I hope you keep connected!

Laika (Jacqueline)


Foto credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/charlietakesphotos/118424928/

Response From Twitter

first-anniversary





What I learned in 2008 (about Web 2.0)

2 02 2009

Grand Round is a weekly collection of the best writing in the medical blogosphere. The coming Grand Rounds (February 3rd, 2009), hosted by Not Totally Rad has the following theme:

February is the first anniversary of my blog. Therefore, the loose theme for submissions will be anniversary-related: write about something cool or important that you’ve learned in the past year.

Well, I have learned a lot in the past year. The most profound personal experience was the death of my father. I experienced how it is to loose a beloved, but I also learned that death and grieve can affect people so deeply that it changes their behavior. I now understand this behavior (anger, mental confusion) is a manifestation of deep grief, which is transient and natural. Luckily our body and mind appear very resilient.

I will restrict to another thing I’ve learned: Web 2.0.
Just like the “Samurai Radiologist” I started a blog in February 2008. Thus Laika’s MedLibLog also celebrates its first anniversary.

Useful Web 2.0 tools

This blog was started as a tool to communicate thoughts, new found skills and ideas with other (>150) SPOETNIK course members, Spoetnik being a Learning 2.0 project to encourage library staff to experiment and learn about the new and emerging Internet technologies.

During the library 2.0 course I learned the basics of blogging, chatting, RSS, Podcasts, Wiki’s and social bookmarking. Each week another item was addressed. This learning program had a direct and positive impact. For instance, I could inform my clients how to create a RSS-feed for PubMed searches. By taking RSS-feeds/email alerts to interesting blogs, wiki’s and journals I kept better informed.

Hard to imagine (now) that I hardly new anything about web 2.0 one year ago.

Web 2.0 is not just a set of tools.

In the beginning I considered blogging largely as a selfish activity. It also appeared a lonely activity. As long as we discussed a course assignment there always was an interaction with at least a handful of other participants. But as soon as the program came to an end, I started to write more and more about medicine, EBM and medical library related matter, which didn’t appeal to most of the other course members. I wrote about things that interested me, but the writing would be absolutely useless if nobody would read it. Thus, how to get an audience?

There were I few things I had to learn and there were a few people who gave me a push in the right direction .

  • Wowter, who gave feedback to my posts right from the start and who encouraged me to continue blogging, posted a list with 17 tips for beginning bloggers (in Dutch) of how to increase visibility and findability of your blog. I became aware that ‘linking’ to others is what is making the web 2.0 world interconnected.
  • Second Dymphie, a Dutch Medical Librarian, encouraged me to start twittering. It took quite a while before I grasped the value of twitter as a networking tool. Twitter is not meant to say “what you do”, but it is a way to share information of any kind. Before you can share it, you first have to find interesting tweeple (people on twitter) and it did take a while before they followed me back (partly because my first tweets weren’t that interesting). Thus I had to learn by trial and error how to become a prolific twitterer.
  • Third I read a very interesting blogpost on “I’m not a geek” of Hutch Carpenter called Becoming a web 2.0 jedi, showing a simple but very accurate chart of the ever deeper levels of involvement one can have with Web 2.0 apps and the Web 2.0 ethos, as Hutch calls them. “Down are the lower levels, those of passive involvement, level 2 is giving up little pieces of yourself, while level 3 is a much bigger sharing experience. Share your own life, share your knowledge, share the stuff you find interesting. A big leap for a lot of us used to being more private. May the force be with you.”
    Seeing his post I realized that my journey had been quite different (figure below, made in September 2008). During the Spoetnik course emphasis was given to the tools themselves not to the ways you should use and share them and contribute to others. We skipped the reading of blogs and wiki’s, the lurking on twitter, but started with chatting, RSS and blogging. Although Web 2.0 tools are the basis, Web 2.0 is more an attitude than the usage of tools, it is about sharing information and thoughts.Or as Dean Giustini says it: It is about people.

The Ecosphere of Twitter and blogs.

I also experienced that all web 2.0 tools are not stand-alone tools, but can reinforce each other. This is for instance true for RSS, bookmarking tools , blogs, but also twitter (a microblogging service). A recent post of Sandnsurf (Mike Cadogan) at Life in the fast Lane uses a brilliant ecosystem metaphore to describe the twitter-blogging relationship. He describes the blogging ecosphere, where twitter decomposes information from journal articles and long blog posts into readily digestible information (nutrients and humus). See Figure from his post below (but read his post here for the whole story). Just like the Jedi chart this diagram illustrate exactly what web 2.0 is about.

Lessons to be learned

I have learned a lot. Am I now a real web 2.0 Jedi?
I’m not sure. In the ecology-model my blog is a young tree, surrounded by many others. But some ecologic dangers are luring.

  • The relative success of my blog results in “an abundance of light which results in a pressure to keep producing enough good quality posts”.
  • I’ve subscribed to so many RSS-feeds I seldomly read them.
  • I have so many twitter-followers (app. 300) that I can’t keep up with all of them as much as I would like to.
  • I read so many things, but haven’t got the time to work them out (or I simply forget).
  • I find it difficult to separate chaff from wheat. Many blogposts and web 2.0 information are not very accurate and superficial. Furthermore people often echo a subject without careful checking or without adding value.

Or in the words of sandnsurf: the death of a blog can ensue due to excessive exposure and Twittaholism. I hope It will not go in that direction, but I have to figure out a way to coop with the overwhelming amount of information and find a balance. That will be part of my (web 2.0) learning process in 2009.

One other thing:

I forgot to mention one very important experience. During my web 2.0 journey I virtually met many interesting, kind and helpful people from all over the world, from US, UK, Eastern Europe to India and Australia. Closer to home I also ‘met’ many very nice Dutch and Belgian people. I never liked the idea of intentional networking, but in web 2.0 the networks arise spontaneously. In a very natural and gradual way I became a member of a large health and library community and that feels good.

You might also want to read:





A 2008 Medical Weblog Awards Finalist…..

6 01 2009

award_lrSome weeks ago I announced that the Medgadget 2008 nomination of the Best Medical Blogs had started.

The unexpected has happened. Laika’s Medliblog has been chosen as a finalist in the category Best New Medical Weblog (established in 2008).

As a Dutch Medical Librarian, and a novice in the web 2.0 world, I’m thrilled and very honored that I’m among the finalists for this prestigious award.

Special thanks to Wowter (with a Dutch and an English blog) who took the initiative to nominate me.

Here is a complete list of the finalists for The 2008 Weblog Awards. The final list of nominees can be found here.

The voting starts tomorrow, well Tuesday 06-01-2008 (that is today here). Please keep tuned in….scanman-announces-finalists

p.s. How did I found out? Via twitter, of course, where one of the other finalists, “Scanman” or Vijay congratulated some of us.Thanks Vijay.






Grand Round 5.15 at Moneduloides. At the interface of evolution and medicine.

30 12 2008

The theme for the old year/new year Grand Round was not an easy one: “At the interface of evolution and medicine“. This theme was chosen to celebrate the coming bicentenary of Darwin’s birth, and the 150th anniversary of the publication of On The Origin of Species.

Moneduloides:

“Coming from the perspective of an individual who conducts medical research in evolutionary genetics, I have found that very few people outside of the world I work have been exposed to all of the ways evolutionary biology interfaces with medicine. My hope is that with this edition of Grand Rounds those who have not yet been exposed to this topic become, at the very least, sufficiently intrigued.”

Although there are less submissions than usual, the subject has been well covered by several bloggers. It has certainly triggered me to learn more about evolutionary biology and the implications on (clinical) medicine.

You can read the elaborate summaries at Moneduloides post here.

Interested in what Moneduloides means: it is derived from Corvus moneduloides, a crow species and the only non-primate animal known to invent new tools by modifying existing ones. Want to get a glimpse of Moneduloides, then read this article (“Evolutionary Biology Offers Glimpse Into Medicine’s Future”) in today’s Medscape Today!

Next Round is at Edwin Leap’s site.





Nomination Best Medical Blogs at MedGadget

19 12 2008

It is time for the 2008 Medical Weblog Awards!

Since 5 years Medgadget, an independent on-line journal covering the latest medical gadgets and technologies, organizes a competition “to showcase the best blogs from the medical blogosphere, and to highlight the exciting and useful role medical blogs play in medicine and in society.”

The 2008 Medical Blog Awards

The categories for this year’s awards are:

  • Best Medical Weblog
  • Best New Medical Weblog (established in 2008)
  • Best Literary Medical Weblog
  • Best Clinical Sciences Weblog
  • Best Health Policies/Ethics Weblog
  • Best Medical Technologies/Informatics Weblog
  • Best Patient’s Weblog

Nominations will be accepted until Wednesday, December 31, 2008. You can put your nominations (1 in each category) in the comments section on the Medgadget site.
An update of the current nominees is given here. For further information see here.





Locate Your Visitors (2)

30 09 2008
ClustrMaps

A few months ago I blogged about how to use ClustrMaps for locating your visitors (see here). I still use Clustrmaps.
The map is cumulative: you get an overview of where the visits cluster (depicted as large or small clusters, see below) and an approximate idea of the locations. Approximate, because you can’t zoom in or look up locations.

Flagcounter
Recently I put a new free widget in the side bar, Flagcounter. This tool also gives a cumulative overview, but it summarizes the counts per country, visualized with flags. Judging from the number of clicks on my Flagcounter, the flags seem popular. You can easily set your preferences (colors, number of colums and flags) and change it afterwards in your widget, i.e. by changing columns=2/maxflags=20 (2 columns with 10 flags) into columns=3/maxflags=21 (3 columns with 7 flags each). Please, consult the FlagCounter-Faq for these and other tips (to avoid starting over again and loose your gathered info).
It is cumulative, thus you get an idea of the countries of origin of visitors over time. On basis of the counts since September it can be concluded that I’m mostly visited (this month) by English speaking people from the United States, UK, Canada and Australia. Of course I’m also frequented by Dutch speaking people form the Netherlands and Belgium.
It is also nice to see from which exotic places visitors found their way to this blog: Libyan Arab Jamahiriya, Aruba, Vietnam, Belarus. Also surprising that India, Phillipines and Malaysia are in the top 15 this month, rather than Spain and Denmark for instance.
Who’s Among us
Also visually attractive is the “who is among us button”. It shows how many visitors are simultaneously present at your blog (within a time span of 10 minutes). The highest number I’ve seen on my blog is 7. For some blogs it’s ‘as usual’, for this blog it is exceptional.
While writing this post I found a bunch of other possibilities hidden behind this button, for instance a world map showing the locations of your visitors, with the people who are currently on your site blinking (light blue in the picture below; not working as a widget in WordPress, but visible when you click on the counter). In addition there is a map with statistics per hour, day, month, year. However, I don’t grasp what the numbers actually stand for. These certainly don’t represent a cumulative number per hour. (if I have 4 visitors per 10 min. than I don’t expect a maximum of 3 per hour or 3 per day?).
Sitemeter
Many of these functionalities are also present in the Sitemeter, a widget that is inconspicuously present at this blog’s sidebar, but is most frequently consulted by me together with the WordPress stats.
Similar to “who’s among us” there is a nice world map, with the most recent visit in red, the last 2-10 visits in green and the other 90 visits in white. You can zoom in, look at the exact location and ip-number of the visitor whether in day or night zone.
It is a good way to improve your topographical knowledge. ;)
Alas you can only observe the last 100 visitors, which means that in my top days I loose the statistics within a day.
If you want to upgrade, you have to pay a few dollar per month at least.

What I like the most, besides the map: the Visit Details of last 100 visitors. This list shows visit time, visit length (however if someone is just reading the frontpage without clicking, it counts as zero seconds), number of pages visited, entry and last page, IP address etc.
You can exclude your own visits and make the stats public or privat.
By using the sitemeter (in conjunction with the WordPress stats) you get an impression which visitors visit which pages.
Sitemeter has helped me to identify the IP address and domain of someone sending me a Google Doc invitation that was really meant as spam (I found out because that IP linked to someone referred to at my blog and later found in that Google doc (see earlier post)).
The sitemeter also helped me to identify the 10.000st visitor: Wowter from Wageningen.




Laika’s Little Party

21 09 2008

It’s time for some reflections on this blog and for a little party. Why?

So for now I will start with the party (with some wine), the reflections will follow when I’m sober.

This week I received an unexpected email from RNCentral (“the place to learn about nursing online”), anouncing that this blog had made it to the “Top 50 Health 2.0 Blogs list ( see here).

The top 50 health 2.0 list is not based on a kind of “objective” ranking like the Healthcare 100 or MedBlogEN lists, which are a measure of how many people link to your site, find your site by searching or have subscribed to your blogposts: thus an indirect measure of “how popular you are“. In such a list I would not make the top-100.
The RNCental site gives a “subjective” top 50 list of blogs, that appear valuable to the authors. The list is introduced with a very nice definition of health 2.0 blogs, that I can subscribe to:

Health 2.0 embraces the idea of bringing health care into the community of physicians, patients, and those in the health care industry together with technology and the Internet to provide the best possible health care environment. What better way for the various parts of this community to share their thoughts and communicate ideas than through their blogs? From corporate blogs to blogs that are a part of social networks to individual blogs touching on technology or health care policy, these blogs will help bring you into the community, provide information and resources, and may perhaps help you find your voice as well.

I’m thrilled that I’m (literally) placed next to David Rothman in the “Health and Technology”-section. Although, to be honest, I see myself as a true beginner in this web 2.0 world and I learn a lot of established web 2.0 experts like David Rothman, KraftyLibrarian, Berci of Science Roll, MD Anderson on Emerging Technologies Librarian, Dean Giustini (UBC Academic Search), Sachet62 on Twitter, symtym from symtym.com, David Bradley from Sciencebase and Dutch colleagues like Wowter (with a dutch and an english blog), Dymphie (Dee’tjes) and many many more. On my blog I try to integrate what I learn elsewhere (articles, posts, twitter messages) with my own knowledge and interest.

The resultant is a rather diverse mixture of subjects in the field of (medical) librarianship, medicine, health (including consumers), evidence based medicine and web 2.0 tools.

Although such a broad mixture might not be appealing to everyone, it is appreciated by some, as is apparent from a recent blog-review in the Library + Information Gazette, 22 August 2008: p5 (UK). The Gazette is only available in print edition and I wouldn’t have known about it if Anne Welsh of “First Person Narrative” had not mentioned it at her blog (see post: “mainstreaming blogs as information sources”). Anne:

“This review is the first in a series “Blog Spotlight” authored by Danielle Worster (the Health Informaticist). It’s aim is to help separating the wheat from the chaff when it comes to blogs in LIS and health informatics.

Any blog that claims to be about information, research, Web 2.0 or health informatics is considered. Each blog discussed is described in terms of its audience, currency, informativeness, authoritativeness / credibility, readability and design, with a brief overview and summary. It’s a nice format, and starts well in this issue with UBC Academic Search , ResearchBuzz and Laika’s MedLibLog.”

With Anne I find it regretful that the gazette is not available online. I surely would like to follow this series.

Luckily I found Keith Nockels (Browsing) willing to make a scan of the Gazette’s review and send it to me.

The Gazette review sketched my blog with very flattering sentences (“colourful, engaging and relevant”, “easy to read and digest”) as well as apt descriptions, which made me grin: “while it does stray to discuss….. Although she writes copious amounts, it is as easy to skim as to read it all…. crammed full of visuals.”

And about Dean’s UBC Academic Blog:

“Very informative: has an uncanny ability to pick up on crucial issue”. …. the blogger’s energy comes through in his shorter sentences….. essential reading.” All true! Dean’s blog is a must in the librarian web 2.0 world!

Apart from these official listings and reviews I got some comments or links that were also heartwarming.

For instance Keith Nockels (a UK Librarian with a nice blog (“Browsing”), apparently familiar with at least a few Dutch words) refers so nicely in his blogpost “More about changes to Ovid”:

“I have since found a posting on Laikas MedLibLog about this, and Laika has obviously looked at this properly! So, I can now report that you (….)
Laikas posting is here (in English and ook in Nederlands) and is gratefully acknowledged. She talks about other things besides, so please read her posting for more!”

And Dr. Shock announcement of the dutch grand round number 1:

Laika Spoetnik presents The Best Study Design… For Dummies (in English).
She writes in English and Dutch so you have no excuse for not reading this excellent post. She clearly explains Randomized Controlled Trials (RCT’s) and the levels of evidence. She uses an example which is easy to follow: Does beta carotene prevent lung cancer.

At Medliblog (the official website of the BMI, Dutch Biomedical Information) Annie (writing about Evidence Based Dietetics refers to the same post, saying:

….handige bijlages met een checklist voor het lezen van wetenschappelijke artikelen en een statistische begrippenlijst, dat laatste blijft toch altijd wel moeilijke stof voor dummies of alfa’s.
Voor die categorie heeft Laika een zeer begrijpelijke blog (zowel Engels- als Nederlandstalig) geschreven, waarvoor mijn dank. Zo’n presentatie zou ik ook wel willen bijwonen.

meaning:

For that category (dummies or alpha people not understanding checklists and studytypes) Laika has written a very comprehensible blogpost (in English and Dutch), for which I would like to thank her. I would have loved to attend such a presentation. (I gave to historians about “how doctors search”).

These comments strengthen me to continue blogging. This is why I blog: that (some) people like to read what I write and learn from some of the posts.

Well that is probably enough shameless self-glorification for now. I do realize that beginners get mild critiques, but as you get more well known the expectations will grow along and the critiques as well.

Next time, at request of Wowter, I will reflect more on the 5W’s of this blog: why, when, who, what, where?





10,000!!

5 09 2008

Dear readers.

An important milestone 4 me.
10,000 hits in ~7 months.
Thanks everyone!

And the 10.000st visitor is from Wageningen, the Netherlands. Wowter? (84.87.26.#??)
Claim your price: a drink, a hug, a post, or a link!!

Laika





Close to 10,000…

3 09 2008

Still >100 to go and we will have a little party over here.
Are you number 10,000 please let me know!

Possible little gifts:

  • Eternal fame, because you may write a post on this blog (via Google Docs)
  • Eternal fame, because I will write about you (if you like)
  • Or If you’re nearby I will buy you a drink/snack or coffee/cake.

———–

Nog maar ruim 100 en we houden hier een klein feestje…
Ben jij nr 10.000 geef me dan een seintje (zelf hou ik het ook in de gaten).

Mogelijke kleine attentie die je ontvangt (naar keuze):

  • Eeuwige roem, omdat je op mijn blog een bericht mag schrijven
  • Eeuwige roem, omdat ik een bericht over jou schrijf
  • Als je in de buurt bent een drankje of koffie (niet uit de automaat) met iets erbij (je mag het ook tegoed houden)
    NL-ers hebben meer kans, dus doe je best!




#Sciblog – a bird-eye’s view from the camera

2 09 2008

Last Saturday I learned from @AJCann and @Jobadge (Twitter) that there was a Science Blogging Conference going on in London, that you could virtually attend.

Although I planned to do something else (banking for my mom, pick up my daughter from her overnight stay; Saturday is my-shopping-&-bodyshape-sauna- & blogging-if-I-have-some-spare-time-day), I decided to follow it. In the meantime I tried to blog about something else, which didn’t work.

I largely followed Cameron Neylon’s streamed video on Mogulus. It’s main value was the audio-stream, as well as the candid-camera function peeping at the audience from behind.

I came in late (back from banking) and unfortunately missed the Keynote lecture of Ben Goldacre from Badscience.

The next session didn’t do it for me, partly because the 3 blogging ladies ( Jenny Rohn, Grrl Scientist, Anna Kushnir) were almost inaudible and what they had to say about the bridging function of blogs between scientists and the general public (also figuratively) didn’t catch my ears. In the meantime the virtual attendents including, Fang (Mike Seyfang) from Australia, AJCann, some other guys and me, chatted in Cameron Neylon’s room.

In between I followed Twitter-messages having the hashtag #sciblog (see here). I was not familiar with hashtags, but it is a predefined tag you can add to you microblogging post to easily tract what is being said about a subject (even when you don’t actually follow the persons themselves, so as a spin off you can get acquainted with some real interesting people).

Example of a twitter message on #sciblog:

#sciblog matt woods: friendfeed encourages discussion and closes feedback loop 9 minutes ago from TwitKit

However, Hashtags is an opt-in service. You must follow @hashtags -and it has to follow you- for the service to index your tweets, so it took me some time to get it done (For more information, see this twitter wiki.) Althoug the procedure in itself was very effective, the twitter messages didn’t add much value for people already attending.

Another online backchannel, the Friendfeed room appeared more lively, but I soon stopped following the threads. Furthermore I ‘m so old-fashioned that I think speakers do deserve my attention while they’re talking (but perhaps that is because I’m not yet used to chatting at the back-scene). Checking my notes afterwards with the Friendfeed comments was useful however.

Next I followed Matt Wood’s introduction to microblogging and aggregation services and Breakout 6 “Communicating Primary Research Publicly” by Heather Etchevers (Human in Science), Jean-Claude Bradley (Useful Chemistry) and Bob O’Hara (Deep Thoughts and Silliness).

I found these presentations interesting, but tracking my notes back I couldn’t see where Matt ended and the others began.

During his lively presentation with a lot of gesturing, the heavy “sequencer” Matt Wood from “Green is Good” told us he had decided not to worry to be open and just send the message out to the public. You could use blogs to communicate your scientific findings, but blogposts do not handle versioning, although you can sometimes manipulate the post’s date (WordPress blog). Another tool is microblogging services. Twitter is more of a social platform, whereas Friendfeed is more apt for more information-exchange (no 140 character-limit). A new microblogging service is identi.ca. (see for instance this readwriteweb post)

Labnote books (and wiki’s) were a recurrent subject through the 4 presentations. They are very useful to blog primary research. People should write their motives, use it as a diary (writing down all details and circumstances), recording the results (videorecording, freehand sketches, figures, prints, text), followed by periodic summing up.

Why this is useful?

  • You don’t have to remember it (people tend to forget) (although some lab-scientists don’t like to take the notebook along to the bench)
  • Archive of ideas, (to share with people in the lab, collaborators or even ‘the world’
  • (If open) some results may be available direct outside the lab, which may be very useful for cooperation and exchange of thoughts or help (why did my blot fail?-how to proceed?)
  • It may help as a bridge to the public, i.e. by showing if public money is being spent well or for direct communication of your data to the public.
  • The info is verifiable if you link to the real data
  • Science is far more efficient this way and results are revealed instantly. Why wait till everything is distilled out? The scientist’s approach is as Hans Ricke quoted Richard Feyman from his Nobel Lecture 1966 (at Bob o’Hara ‘s blog) :

“We have a habit in writing articles published in scientific journals to make the work as finished as possible, to cover up all the tracks, to not worry about the blind alleys or describe how you had the wrong idea first, and so on. So there isn’t any place to publish, in a dignified manner,what you actually did in order to get to do the work.”

As Hans said blogs may fill that hole, because they are the place to publish this!

Major Pitfall may be that journals may not accept data reported on a wiki. And another that some people may run away with your ideas. By writing it all down you make it very easy on them. Still if everybody would become open…. For Science that would be a great good.

What I liked most of these presentations is the openness and the creativity of the presenters.
As a (medical) librarian and a scientist these thoughts came to my mind:

  • I’m a bit jealous that I worked as a scientist in the web 1.0 era. This way of approaching science looks very stimulating to me, but maybe that’s only a romantic look from the outside?
  • How do we as librarians step in? Can we play a facilitating role? Should these primary findings be aggregated and made available in a searchable way?
    We should at least keep more in pace with the new scientific developments and the way researchers exchange and find their information. It’s entirely different to what we are used to. (we= most librarians I know, including myself)
  • I wonder if such an approach could also be used in medicine and/or in EBM. Are wiki’s like this useful for CATs for instance? Question, PICO + domain, best study type, search, critical appraisal, summary, power point presentation, pdf-files, video of CAT etc??? link to video of casus perhaps?

To get an impression of the great features of such a wiki/open notebook, take a look at http://usefulchem.wikispaces.com/ (Jean Claude Bradley). You can also go to the Useful Chemistry blog and click at “UsefulChem wiki”. Note for instance the links to the notebooks of the individual scientists. Really impressive.

Below you also find the (short) presentation of Heather. Hope the others will follow soon and share their presentations

more about “Sciblog2008 Etchevers“, posted with vodpod
Other Info





1st Dutch Grand Round expected soon

16 08 2008

Jan Martens has announced the start of the Dutch version of the grand rounds on his blog. You can submit your articles online. The deadline is August 24th and the first publication is due August 26th.

This first issue wil be published at the blog of Dr Shock MD PhD.

From Dr. Shock's website

From Dr. Shock's Website

On October 21th it will be my turn to host the Grand Round.

See: Previous post on this subject (Dutch Grand Round?) here.

This was the good news. The bad news is that Jan Martens also announced to discontinue the MedBlogNL top 25 and MedBlogEN top 100, at least for a while (see posts 1 and 2). Hopefully there will come a solution for this, at least for the MedBlogNL top 25, which has no real equivalent.

—————————————————-

Jan Martens heeft op zijn blog nu officieel aangekondigd dat binnenkort de Nederlandse “grote visite” van start gaat. U kunt nu alvast artikelen opgeven voor de ronde. De deadline is 24 augustus. Streven is de eerste ronde op 26 augustus te publiceren.

Deze 1ste grote visite wordt gepubliceerd op het blog van Dr Shock.

21 Oktober is het mijn beurt om gastvrouw te spelen.

Zie: eerder bericht over dit onderwerp (Dutch grand Round?) hier.

Dit was het goede nieuws. Het slechte nieuws is dat Jan Martens zich genoodzaakt ziet om, in ieder geval voorlopig, met de MedBlogNL top 25 en de MedBlogEN top 100, te stoppen (zie berichten 1 and 2). Hopelijk wordt hier wat op gevonden, want het zou toch zonde zijn als de MedBlogNL top 25 zou ophouden te bestaan. Het is echt de enige in zijn soort…





Spoetnikblogs als een woordenwolk

9 08 2008

In een vorige post (zie hier) had ik het over WORDLE, een programma waarmee je woordenwolken kunt maken.

Het leek mij leuk om mijn Spoetnik-blogroll in een Wordle-creatie te vangen. Alle links die in mijn blogroll staan (stonden?!) bracht ik over naar Word en ik gaf gewicht aan de links door ze een aantal malen te kopieren, varierend van 1x tot 6x. De grootte van de woorden in Wordle is namelijk afhankelijk van hun frequentie. De woorden kun je in Wordle invoeren bij “create”. Wanneer de woordenwolk gecreeerd is kun je het aanpassen: lettertype, kleurenpalet en orientatie. Vervolgens kun je het in de galerij opslaan en printen, maar niet als figuur downloaden. Het is nl. gebaseerd op Java-script. Ik doe dat indirect via een programmaatje dat ik gekocht heb: SnagIt.

Vervolgens leek het me leuk alle spoetnikblogs in een echte wolk te vatten. Ik heb wel de http’s en wordpress etc. termen erafgehaald. In eerste instantie had ik het niet aangepast aan mijn blogrollversie, met als gevolg dat iemand onder 2 namen kon voorkomen oefenings~40’s~blog of oefening40. Vervolgens heb ik alleen de officiele spoetniknamen (webadressen) aangehouden. Alle blogs die geen belletje bij me deden rinkelen noteerde ik 1x, blogs die dat wel deden 2x en blogs die op mijn blogroll voorkwamen minimaal 3x. “Opgeheven” heb ik maar laten staan en blogs waarvan ik weet dat ze onder een andere naam gehandhaafd zijn heb ik ook vermeld: Een Beetje Adjunct (http://zeemanspraat.wordpress.com/ van Ubabert) en FNWI nieuwbouw beta bibliotheek (http://betabieb.wordpress.com/ van Zygomorf). Vanzelfsprekend is het gewicht dat ik eraan toegekend heb geheel persoonlijk.

Wordle is vooral fraai, het maakt woordwolken, blogrolls, tagsclouds e.d. tot een kunstzinnig object, een tastbaar iets. Helaas zijn de namen niet aanklikbaar, dus als blogroll heb je er niet veel aan.

Wil je de plaatjes beter bekijken, klik er dan op en kijk of je naam erbij staat.

Nu ik de blogroll bekijk, bedenk ik wel dat deze niet meer uptodate is. Veel mensen onderhouden hun Spoetnikblog niet meer. Aan de andere kant heb ik nu andere blogs leren kennen die èn actueel zijn èn op mijn interessegebied liggen. Daarom ga ik links van Spoetnik-blogs verwijderen, voorzover ze niet meer bijgehouden worden om ruimte te maken voor andere blogs/links.

Willen jullie me laten weten of:

  • je vindt dat ik je onterecht verwijderd heb (je gaat door met je blog)
  • of ik je misschien vergeten ben en je wel op mijn blogroll wilt staan?
  • of jij (of jouw bieb) misschien een andere blog bent begonnen? (geef dan de link)
  • of vertel hier even hoe het met je gaat, heb je ook een “after-spoetnik-dip”? of is het leven er alleen maar zonniger op geworden tijdens je vakantie en na de spoetnik-drukte?

Wil je zelf een WORDLE-plaatje maken, lees evt mijn vorige post (zie hier) of ga direct naar de Wordle-create pagina. Het wijst zich wel vanzelf en het is leuk (lees verslavend) om wat te experimenteren. Ik zag tussen 2 haakjes dat Bert op zijn nieuwe blog Zeemanspraat al een maand eerder een Wordle-wolk had gemaakt van een van zijn presentaties (zie hier)

Spoetnikblogs, UBA -en niet-UBA-deelnemers, vetgedrukt zij die (ooit) op mijn blogroll staan (stonden):

(Ja sorry niet overal de nr ervoor, ik had ze eerst verwijderd, maar om de verwijderde nummers achteraf weer toe te voegen???!! EEn karwei hoor, handmatig al die links toevoegen en http en wordpress.com verwijderen pfffffff)
UBA-deelnemers: 1. ubaspoetnik 2. spoetnik.mtb-schoorl.nl 3. astolfosullaluna 4. nielsmr 5. swealtsje ; robinvs ; swealtsje ; jaapdevisser ; afvalchinees ; jwdjoker. salamanc ; dexie ; moirac ; oefening40 ; lezen20. ; woutv ; nabaghlavi ; snavely ; donkeytail ; sperwer4 ; ijsbus ; ubsarah ; metgezel dorades ; zygomorf ; aristotalloss ; h1gh5 ; laikaspoetnik ; brughagedis ; averhag1; bidocblog ; pentagruel ; oktoberkind29 ; ubafranca ; duyfje ; sarabeemsterboer ; kramerotten ; plisu ; lynndelisa ; gildederspoetnikker ; margrieto ; filipsdestoute/ ; joeri25 ; geraldapm ; . criticus ; mammen ; annadv. ; creabea ; berendina. ; basler ; majomikl. ; acqvier ; overzichter ; gvulot ; gitele.; bibliobes ; athahualpa zanni3s ; mfeijen 59. mjdebooys. 60. timelost 61. jansenangeline 62. tillie 63. wmeijer1 64. googoes 65. epbintje 66. ubabert 67. sabineg49 68. hoorn 69. datinka. 70. wodunit 71. agje 72. boekenvlindertje 73. biciuvajamvw 75. rfernho 76. davehak 77. zwaandebbie 78. klokhuis 80. mar1jke 82. jeroenub1 83. snahamrof. 84. praagselente 85. herrie1 86. roosophetrokin. 87. 1forens. 88. grrootje 89. geantduprov 90. kaihenriquez 91. nancykleenex 92. aanbrand 93. turquoois 94. klijtberroo 95. hian46 96. technopcj 97. pussycat123 98. kate57 99. happymax100. lieuwekool 101. jbties 102. zichor 103. julietteolivier 104. staminalopodax 105. grensgebieden 106. snoever 107. guusroeloff 108. bknuppebv 109. ritagulinck 111. marcelsampimon. 112. iwoiwo 113. nikspoet 114. jeroenxx 115. debibliotheker 116. kladblogje 117. gazendam 118. elkedagwatanders 119. pimpampet 120. agnessavd 121. prbiebmiep 122. moniquekooijmans 123. schwitters 124. diederikmajoor 125. zonnetje4 126. redibis 127. yvonne18 128. loindesponts 129. raybeuker 130. martien128 131. trijnvanhamborg 132. truitje 133. mietjekopietje
Niet UBA-deelnemers
: 1. hollander68 2. wondersteen 3. hobbeltjes 4. ratafurell 5. tandory 6. no33.nl 7. evantee 8. peepastinakel 9. annajo 10. makok 11. gertiebastiaansen 12. ubautist 13. happinez 14. /wimam 15. maaikemo 16. calypta 17. gevleugeld 18. sotoha 19. xspainter 20. aagjedeboer 21. hoigagarin 22. rovingreports 23. bibliotheekheb 24. mariettevandepoll 25. chuqui9 26.leefsma 27. http://vooruitkijkengodelieveengbersen.blogspot.com 28. http://riamuisje.wordpress.com 29. http://pulpje.wordpress.com
74.

———————————–
Like to know what this is all about?? I’ve made a word cloud of the blogs of the online course SPOETNIK on NEW (web 2.0) internet communication methods for (dutch) librarians. First I made a cloud of the spoetnik blogs that were on my blogroll, then I made a cloud of all Spoetnikbloks including all cancelled ones (“opgeheven”).

However, I decided not to leave all Spoetnik blogs permanently on my blogroll for purely nostalgic reasons, but to remove those blogs that are poorly maintained or in a dormant state.
On the other hand I will soon add some blogs that I’ve been into lately, mostly on the field of medical librarianship, medicine and science.

If you’re interested in Wordle, you might take a look at my previous post on this subject or go directly to Wordle to create your own word-cloud.








Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 610 other followers