#Cochrane Colloquium 2009: Better Working Relationship between Cochrane and Guideline Developers

19 10 2009

singapore CCLast week I attended the annual Cochrane Colloquium in Singapore. I will summarize some of the meetings.

Here is a summary of an interesting (parallel) special session: Creating a closer working relationship between Cochrane and Guideline Developers. This session was brought together as a partnership between the Guidelines International Network (G-I-N) and The Cochrane Collaboration to look at the current experience of guideline developers and their use of Cochrane reviews (see abstract).

Emma Tavender of the EPOC Australian Satellite, Australia reported on the survey carried out by the UK Cochrane Centre to identify the use of Cochrane reviews in guidelines produced in the UK ) (not attended this presentation) .

Pwee Keng Ho, Ministry of Health, Singapore, is leading the Health Technology Assessment (HTA) and guideline development program of the Singapore Ministry of Health. He spoke about the issues faced as a guideline developer using Cochrane reviews or -in his own words- his task was: “to summarize whether guideline developers like Cochrane Systematic reviews or not” .

Keng Ho presented the results of 3 surveys of different guideline developers. Most surveys had very few respondents: 12-29 if I remember it well.

Each survey had approximately the same questions, but in a different order. On the face of it, the 3 surveys gave the same picture.

Main points:

  • some guideline developers are not familiar with Cochrane Systematic Reviews
  • others have no access to it.
  • of those who are familiar with the Cochrane Reviews and do have access to it, most found the Cochrane reviews useful and reliable. (in one survey half of the respondents were neutral)
  • most importantly they actually did use the Cochrane reviews for most of their guidelines.
  • these guideline developers also used the Cochrane methodology to make their guidelines (whereas most physicians are not inclined to use the exhaustive search strategies and systematic approach of the Cochrane Collaboration)
  • An often heard critique of Guideline developers concerned the non-comprehensive coverage of topics by Cochrane Reviews. However, unlike in Western countries, the Singapore minister of Health mentioned acupuncture and herbs as missing topics (for certain diseases).

This incomplete coverage caused by a not-demand driven choice of subjects was a recurrent topic at this meeting and a main issue recognized by the entire Cochrane Community. Therefore priority setting of Cochrane Systematic reviews is one of the main topics addressed at this Colloquium and in the Cochrane Strategic review.

Kay Dickersin of the US Cochrane Center, USA, reported on the issues raised at the stakeholders meeting held in June 2009 in the US (see here for agenda) on whether systematic reviews can effectively inform guideline development, with a particular focus on areas of controversy and debate.

The Stakeholder summit concentrated on using quality SR’s for guidelines. This is different from effectiveness research, for which the Institute of Medicine (IOM) sets the standards: local and specialist guidelines require a different expertise and approach.

All kinds of people are involved in the development of guidelines, i.e. nurses, consumers, physicians.
Important issues to address, point by point:

  • Some may not understand the need to be systematic
  • How to get physicians on board: they are not very comfortable with extensive searching and systematic work
  • Ongoing education, like how-to workshops, is essential
  • What to do if there is no evidence?
  • More transparency; handling conflicts of interest
  • Guidelines differ, including the rating of the evidence. Almost everyone in the Stakeholders meeting used GRADE to grade the evidence, but not as it was originally described. There were numerous variations on the same theme. One question is whether there should be one system or not.
  • Another -recurrent- issue was that Guidelines should be made actionable.

Here are podcasts covering the meeting

Gordon Guyatt, McMaster University, Canada, gave  an outline of the GRADE approach and the purpose of ‘Summary of Findings’ tables, and how both are perceived by Cochrane review authors and guideline developers.

Gordon Guyatt, whose magnificent book ” Users’ Guide to the Medical Literature”  (JAMA-Evidence) lies at my desk, was clearly in favor of adherence to the original Grade-guidelines. Forty organizations have adopted these Grade Guidelines.

Grade stands for “Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation”  system. It is used for grading evidence when submitting a clinical guidelines article. Six articles in the BMJ are specifically devoted to GRADE (see here for one (full text); and 2 (PubMed)). GRADE not only takes the rigor of the methods  into account, but also the balance between the benefits and the risks, burdens, and costs.

Suppose  a guideline would recommend  to use thrombolysis to treat disease X, because a good quality small RCTs show thrombolysis to be slightly but significantly more effective than heparin in this disease. However by relying on only direct evidence from the RCT’s it isn’t taken into account that observational studies have long shown that thrombolysis enhances the risk of massive bleeding in diseases Y and Z. Clearly the risk of harm is the same in disease X: both benefits and harms should be weighted.
Guyatt gave several other examples illustrating the importance of grading the evidence and the understandable overview presented in the Summary of Findings Table.

Another issue is that guideline makers are distressingly ready to embrace surrogate endpoints instead of outcomes that are more relevant to the patient. For instance it is not very meaningful if angiographic outcomes are improved, but mortality or the recurrence of cardiovascular disease are not.
GRADE takes into account if indirect evidence is used: It downgrades the evidence rating.  Downgrading also occurs in case of low quality RCT’s or the non-trade off of benefits versus harms.

Guyatt pleaded for uniform use of GRADE, and advised everybody to get comfortable with it.

Although I must say that it can feel somewhat uncomfortable to give absolute rates to non-absolute differences. These are really man-made formulas, people agreed upon. On the other hand it is a good thing that it is not only the outcome of the RCT’s with respect to benefits (of sometimes surrogate markers) that count.

A final remark of Guyatt: ” Everybody makes the claim they are following evidence based approach, but you have to learn them what that really means.”
Indeed, many people talk about their findings and/or recommendations being evidence based, because “EBM sells well”, but upon closer examination many reports are hardly worth the name.

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Cochrane 2.0 Workshop at the Cochrane Colloquium #CC2009

12 10 2009

Today Chris Mavergames and I held a workshop at the Cochrane Colloquium, entitled:  Web 2.0 for Cochrane (see previous post and abstract of the workshop)

First I gave an introduction into Medicine 2.0 and (thus) Web 2.0. Chris, Web Operations Manager and Information Architect of the Cochrane Collaboration, talked more about which Web 2.0 tools were already used by the Cochrane Collaboration and which Web 2.0 might be useful as such.

We had half an hour for discussion which was easily filled. There was no doubt about the usefulness of Web 2.0 for the Cochrane in this group. Therefore, there was ample room for discussing technical aspects, like:

  • Can you load your RSS feed of a PubMed search in Reference Manager? (According to Chris you can)
  • How can you deal with this lot of information (by following a specific subject, or not too much people – not many updates on a daily basis; you don’t have to follow it all, just pick up the headlines, when you can)
  • Are you involved in a Wiki that is successful? (it appears very difficult to involve people)
  • What happens if people comment or upload picture on facebook (of the Cochrane collaboration) in an appropriate way (Chris: didn’t happen, but you have to check and remove them)
  • How do you follow tweets (we showed Tweetdeckhashtags # and #followfridays)
  • What is the worst thing that happened to you (regarding web 2.0)? Chris and I thought a long time. Chris: that I revealed something that wasn’t officially public yet (though appeared to be o.k.). Me: spam (but I remove it/don’t approve it).
    Later I remembered two better (worse) examples, like the “Clinical Reader” social misbehaviour, a good example of how “branding” should not be done, and sites that publish top 50 and 100 list of bloggers just to get more traffic to their spam websites

Below is my presentation on Slideshare.

The (awful) green blackgound color indicates I went “live” on the web. As a reminder of what I did, I included some screendumps.

The current workshop was just meant to introduce and discuss Medicine 2.0 and Cochrane 2.0.

I hope we have a vivid discussion Wednesday when the plenary lectures deal with Cochrane 2.0.

The answers to my question on Twitter

  1. Why Web 2.0 is useful? (or not)
  2. Why we need Cochrane 2.0? (or not)

can be found on Visibletweets (temporary) and saved as: Quoteurl.com/sggq0 (permanent selection).

I think it would be good when these points are taken into account during the Cochrane 2.0 plenary discussions.

* possible WIKI (+ links) might appear at http://medicine20.wetpaint.com/page/Cochrane+2.0

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This week I will blog from…..

10 10 2009

35167809 singapore colloquiumPicture taken by Chris Mavergames http://twitpic.com/kxrnl

Chris and I will facilitate a web 2.0 workshop for the Cochrane (see here, for all workshops see here).
The entire program can be viewed at the Cochrane Colloquium site.

Chris Mavergames, Web Operations Manager and Information Architect of the Cochrane Collaboration will also give a plenary presentation entitled:
Cochrane for the Twitter generation:
inserting ourselves into the ‘conversation
‘”.

The session has the promising title: The Cochrane Library – brave new world?

Here is the introductory text of the session:

The Cochrane Collaboration is not unique in facing a considerable challenge to the way it packages and disseminates healthcare information. The proliferation of communication platforms and social networking sites provides opportunities to reach new audiences, but how far can or should the Collaboration go in embracing these new media? In this session we hear from speakers who are at the heart of the discussions about The Cochrane Library’s future direction, including the Library’s Editor in Chief. We finish the session with reflections on the week’s discussions with respect to the Strategic Review (…)

Request (for the workshop, not the plenary session):
If you ‘re on Twitter, could you please tell the participants of the (small) web 2.0 workshop  your opinion on the following, using the hashtag #CC20.
*

  1. Why Web 2.0 is useful? (or not)
  2. Why we need Cochrane 2.0? (or not)

An example of such an answer (from @Berci):

#CC20 Web 2.0 opens up the world and eases communication. Cochrane 2.0 is needed bc such an important database should have a modern platform

If you don’t have Twitter you can add your comment here and I will post it for you (if you leave a name).

Thanks for all who have contributed so far.

—–

*this is only for our small-scaled workshop, I propose to use #CC2009 for the conference itself.

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CC (2) Duodecim: Connecting patients (and doctors) to the best-evidence

5 10 2008

This is the second post in the series Cochrane Colloquium (CC) 2008.

In the previous post, I mentioned a very interesting opening session.

Here I will summarize one of the presentations in that opening session, i.e. the presentation by Pekka Mustonen, called:

Connecting patients to the best-evidence through technology: An effective solution or “the great seduction”?

Pekka essentially showed us what the Finnish have achieved with their Duodecim database.

Duodecim was started as a health portal for professionals only. It is a database (a decision support system) made by doctors for doctors. It contains Evidence Base (EBM) Guidelines with:

  • regularly updated recommendations
  • links to evidence, including guidelines and Cochrane Systematic Reviews
  • commentaries

Busy Clinicians don’t have the time to perform an extensive search to find the best available evidence each time they have a clinical question. Ideally, they only would have to carry out one search, taking not more than one minute to find the right information.

This demand seems to be reasonably met by Duodecim.

Notably, Duodecim is not only very popular as a source for clinicians ànd nurses, the guidelines are also read and followed by them. Those familiar with healthcare know that this is the main obstacle: getting doctors and nurses to actually use the guidelines.

According to Pekka, patients are even more important than doctors to implement guidelines: Half of the patients don’t seem to follow their doctor’s advice. If the advice is to keep on inhaled steroids for long-term management for asthma, many patients won’t follow that advice, for instance. “When you reach patients, small changes can have large benefits”, he said.

However, although many patients rely on internet to find health information, formal health information sites face fierce competition on Internet. It is difficult for consumers to separate chaff from wheat:

Still, Duodecim has managed to make a website for the general public that is now as popular as the original physicians database is for doctors, the only difference being that doctors use the database continuously, whereas the general public just consults the database when they are confronted with a health problem.
The database contains 1000 EBM key articles, where the content is integrated with personal health records. The site looks rather straightforward, not glitzy nor flashy. Intentionally, in order to look like a serious and trustworthy professional health care site.

A survey revealed that Duodecim performed a lot better than Google in answering health care questions, and does lead to more people either deciding NOT to consult a physician (because they are reassured), or deciding to consult one (because the symptoms might be more serious than thought). Thus it can make a difference!

The results are communicated differently to patients compared to doctors. For instance, whether it is useful to wear stockings during long-haul flights to prevent deep venous thrombosis in patients that have either a low or a high risk for thrombosis is explained to the physician in terms of RR, ARR, RRR and NNT.
Patients see a table with red (high risk patients) and green columns (low risk patients). Conclusions will be translated as follows:

If 1000 patients with a low risk for DVT wear stockings on long-haul flights

  • 9 will avoid it
  • 1 will get it
  • 1 out of 1000 (will get it)
  • 990 use stocking in vain

If 1000 patients at high risk for DVT wear stockings on long-haul flights:

  • 27 will avoid it
  • 3 will get it
  • 1 out of 333 (will get it)
  • 970 use stocking in vain

This database will be integrated with permanent health records and virtual health checks. It is also linked to a tv program with the aim of changing the way of living. Online you can do a life expectancy test to see what age you would reach if you continue your life style as you do (compare “je echte leeftijd”, “your real age”[dutch]).

“What young people don’t realize”, Pekka said, is that most older people find that the best of life starts at the age of 60(?!) Thus, it doesn’t end at 30, as most youngsters think. But young people will only notice, when they reach old age in good health. To do this, they must change their habits already when young.

The Finnish database is for free for Finnish people.

Quite coincidentally (asking for a free usb-stick at the Wiley stand ;) ) I found out that Wiley’s database EBM Guidelines links to the Duodecim platform (see below). Quite interesting to take a trial, I think.

(Although this presumably is only the professional part of Duodecim, thus not the patient oriented database.)





Attend the virtual Cochrane Colloquium

5 10 2008

The annual Cochrane Colloquium is now ongoing in Freiburg, Germany. The theme is “Evidence in the Era of Globalisation.”

As many readers may already know, the Cochrane (CC, Cochrane Collaboration) is an international not-for-profit and independent organization, dedicated to making up-to-date, accurate information about the effects of healthcare readily available worldwide. It produces and disseminates systematic reviews of healthcare interventions and promotes the search for evidence in the form of clinical trials and other studies of interventions (see Glossary).

The yearly Cochrane Colloquium is meant for members of the CC, and those interested in the organization.

For those that cannot attend the meeting, there is an opportunity to virtually view the following items:

To go to the individual virtual items you can click one of the items above.

You can also go to “Welcome” by following this link and go to the Virtual Colloquium. It is easier to switch to another item from there.

It should be noted that there is also a lot uncovered by the virtual media: the meetings and workshops (of course), as well as the (non plenary) oral sessions and even the very interesting opening session with the following speakers: Gerd Antes (German Congres Centre), Tikki Pang (WHO) and Pekka Mustonen (Duodecim).

An overview of the colloquium program can be found here.








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