Medical Information Matters: 2nd Call For Submissions

1 04 2011

You may have noticed that my blog was barely updated between November and February. Lets say I had the winter blues.

As a consequence, the Blog Carnival “Medical Information Matters” hibernated as well. Unintended… But as a host you need to actively engage in blog carnivals. Else few people will submit.

This is the reason that Martin Fenner at Gobblydook didn’t post “his edition”, but luckily he is willing to give it another try.

Here was his call for submissions (in December). I have adapted it a little to make it “up to date”.

In December April I am hosting the blog carnival Medical Information Matters, a blog carnival about – medical information. The deadline for submissions is next Tuesday this weekend, and I have already received a number of interesting posts. As Christmas is right around the corner, I thought that a good theme for the carnival would be a wish list for better medical information. This could mean many different things, e.g. a database that covers a specific area, better access to fulltext papers or clinical trial results, etc. Please submit your posts here.

So, if you have written (or are able to write) a post which fits in with this topic – or fits in with the broader theme of “medical information” or “medical library matters”, please submit the URL (permalink) of your post HERE at the Blog Carnival.

You may also submit a post of someone else. Tips are also appreciated.

See the archive for more information.

For more ideas about what to submit, here is the previous edition at Dean Giustini’s “The Search Principle blog”Medical Blogging Matters: A Carnival of Ideas, November 2010

And, no this is not a April fools day joke….





Collaborating and Delivering Literature Search Results to Clinical Teams Using Web 2.0 Tools

8 08 2010

ResearchBlogging.orgThere seem to be two camps in the library, the medical and many other worlds: those who embrace Web 2.0, because they consider it useful for their practice and those who are unaware of Web 2.0 or think it is just a fad. There are only a few ways the Web 2.0-critical people can be convinced: by arguments (hardly), by studies that show evidence of its usefulness and by examples of what works and what doesn’t work.

The paper of Shamsha Damani and Stephanie Fulton published in the latest Medical Reference Services Quarterly [1] falls in the latter category. Perhaps the name Shamsha Damania rings a bell: she is a prominent twitterer and has written quest posts at this blog on several occasions (here, herehere and here)

As clinical librarians at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Shamsha and Stephanie are immersed in clinical teams and provide evidence-based literature for various institutional clinical algorithms designed for patient care.

These were some of the problems the clinical librarians encountered when sharing the results of their searches with the teams by classic methods (email):

First, team members were from different departments and were dispersed across the sprawling hospital campus. Since the teams did not meet in person very often, it was difficult for the librarians to receive timely feedback on the results of each literature search. Second, results sent from multiple database vendors were either not received or were overlooked by team members. Third, even if users received the bibliography, they still had to manually search for and locate the full text of articles. The librarians also experimented with e-mailing EndNote libraries; however, many users were not familiar with EndNote and did not have the time to learn how to use it. E-mails in general tended to get lost in the shuffle, and librarians often found themselves re-sending e-mails with attachments. Lastly, it was difficult to update the results of a literature search in a consistent manner and obtain meaningful feedback from the entire team.

Therefore, they tried several Web 2.0 tools for sharing search results with their clinical teams.
In their article, the librarians share their experience with the various applications they explored that allowed centralization of the search results, provided easy online access, and enabled collaboration within the group.

Online Reference Management Tools were the librarians’ first choice, since these are specifically designed to help users gather and store references from multiple databases and allow sharing of results. Of the available tools, Refworks was eventually not tested, because it required two sets of usernames and passwords. In contrast, EndNote Web can be accessed from any computer with a username and password. Endnoteweb is suitable for downloading and managing references from multiple databases and for retrieving full text papers as well as  for online collaboration. In theory, that is. In practice, the team members experienced several difficulties: trouble to remember the usernames and passwords, difficulties using the link resolver and navigating to the full text of each article and back to the Endnote homepage. Furthermore, accessing the full text of each article was considered a too laborious process.

Next, free Social bookmarking sites were tested allowing users to bookmark Web sites and articles, to share the bookmarks and to access them from any computer. However, most team members didn’t create an account and could therefore not make use of the collaborative features. The bookmarking sites were deemed ‘‘user-unfriendly’’, because  (1) the overall layout and the presentation of results -with the many links- were experienced as confusing,  (2) sorting possibilities were not suitable for this purpose and (3) it was impossible to search within the abstracts, which were not part of the bookmarked records. This was true both for Delicious and Connotea, even though the latter is more apt for science and medicine, includes bibliographic information and allows import and export of references from other systems. An other drawback was that the librarians needed to bookmark and comment each individual article.

Wikis (PBWorks and SharePoint) appeared most user-friendly, because they were intuitive and easy to use: the librarians had created a shared username and password for the entire team, the wiki was behind the hospital’s firewall (preferred by the team) and the users could access the articles with one click. For the librarians it was labor-consuming as they annotated the bibliographies, published it on the wiki and added persistent links to each article. It is not clear from the article how final reference lists were created by the team afterwards. Probably by cut & paste, because Wikis don’t seem suitable as a Word processor nor  are they suitable for  import and export of references.

Some Remarks

It is informative to read the pros and cons of the various Web 2.0 tools for collaborating and delivering search results. For me, it was even more valuable to read how the research was done. As the authors note (quote):

There is no ‘‘one-size-fits-all’’ approach. Each platform must be tested and evaluated to see how and where it fits within the user’s workflow. When evaluating various Web 2.0 technologies, librarians should try to keep users at the forefront and seek feedback frequently in order to provide better service. Only after months of exploration did the librarians at MD Anderson Cancer Center learn that their users preferred wikis and 1-click access to full-text articles. Librarians were surprised to learn that users did not like the library’s link resolvers and wanted a more direct way to access information.

Indeed, there is no ‘‘one-size-fits-all’’ approach. For that reason too, the results obtained may only apply in certain settings.

I was impressed by the level of involvement of the clinical librarians and the time they put not only in searching, but also in presenting the data, in ranking the references according to study design, publication type, and date and in annotating the references. I hope they prune the results as well, because applying this procedure to 1000 or more references is no kidding. And, although it may be ideal for the library users, not all librarians work like this. I know of no Dutch librarian who does. Because of the workload such a ready made wiki may not be feasible for many librarians .

The librarians starting point was to find an easy and intuitive Web based tool that allowed collaborating and sharing of references.
The emphasis seems more on the sharing, since end-users did not seem to collaborate via the wikis themselves. I also wonder if the simpler and free Google Docs wouldn’t fulfill most of the needs. In addition, some of the tools might have been perceived more useful if users had received some training beforehand.
The training we offer in Reference Manager, is usually sufficient to learn to work efficiently with this quite complex reference manager tool. Of course, desktop software is not suitable for collaboration online (although it could always be easily exported to an easier system), but a short training may take away most of the barriers people feel when using a new tool (and with the advantage that they can use this tool for other purposes).

In short,

Of the Web 2.0 tools tested, wikis were the most intuitive and easy to use tools for collaborating with clinical teams and for delivering the literature search results. Although it is easy to use by end-users, it seems very time-consuming for librarians, who make ready-to-use lists with annotations.

Clinical teams of MD Anderson must be very lucky with their clinical librarians.

Reference
Damani S, & Fulton S (2010). Collaborating and delivering literature search results to clinical teams using web 2.0 tools. Medical reference services quarterly, 29 (3), 207-17 PMID: 20677061

Are you a Twitter user? Tweet this!

———————————

Added: August 9th 2010, 21:30 pm

On basis of the comments below (Annemarie Cunningham) and on Twitter (@Dymphie – here and here (Dutch)) I think it is a good idea to include a figure of one of the published wiki-lists.

It looks beautiful, but -as said- where is the collaborative aspect? Like Dymphie I have the impression that these lists are no different from the “normal” reference lists. Or am I missing something? I also agree with Dymphie that instructing people in Reference Manager may be much more efficient for this purpose.

It is interesting to read Christina Pikas view about this paper. At her blog Christina’s Lis Rant (just moved to the new Scientopia platform) Christina first describes how she delivers her search results to her customers and which platforms she uses for this. Then she shares some thoughts about the paper, like:

  • they (the authors) ruled out RefWorks because it required two sets of logins/passwords – hmm, why not RefWorks with RefShare? Why two sets of passwords?
  • SharePoint wikis suck. I would probably use some other type of web part – even a discussion board entry for each article.
  • they really didn’t use the 2.0 aspects of the 2.0 tools – particularly in the case of the wiki. The most valued aspects were access without a lot of logins and then access to the full text without a lot of clicks.

Like Christina,  I would be interested in hearing other approaches – particularly using newer tools.






Internet Cool Tools for Physicians [book]

11 12 2008

rothman-boek

The well known medical librarian-geek David Rothman of Davidrothman.net contributed to a (probably) very cool book:

Internet Cool Tools for Physicians
Rethlefsen, Melissa L., Rothman, David L., Mojon, Daniel S.

Bibliographic information: 2009, XIV, 154 p. 79 illus., Softcover
ISBN: 978-3-540-76381-9

It can be obtained from amazon.com or from Springer Publishing. It costs appr. $30.

I immediately wanted to order it, but even in the US it is not available for another month….

Sources:





Free HILJ 25th Anniversary Supplement

6 11 2008

hilj-25-jaar-schaduw

Health Information and Libraries Journal (HILJ) celebrates its 25th anniversary.

To mark the journal’s anniversary a special celebratory issue, guest edited by Andrew Booth, is being published in December 2008.
Contributors to this supplement include such well known names as Muir Gray, William Hersh, Margaret Haines, Ann McKibbon and Joanne Marshall.

These commentators and others follow the evolution of the journal from its origins on the first editor’s kitchen table in the early 1980′s to its 2008 electronic editorial office. They also survey the past 25 years of health care information services and look to what the future may hold.
The supplement in divided into various sections including:

  • evolution of the journal;
  • 25 years of learning and teaching in action;
  • 25 years of information technology in libraries;
  • 25 years of using evidence in practice;
  • widening panoramas:incorporating health informatics and international perspectives;
  • and future perspectives.

The issue will be available free online forthcoming December at www.blackwellpublishing.com/hilj

Nice detail: To get HILJ-readers involved a special wiki is created (http://yourjournal.pbwiki.com/) where people can submit their contributions.

Brought to my attention by: Suzanne Bakker, Editorial advisory board of HILJ





Ex soccer player now a med student; tv shots at our library

16 10 2008

Wanna see the previous soccer player Arjan de Zeeuw now continuing his medicine study, after a long intermezzo in the English league?? Or wanna see tv-shots of our academic Medical Centre (AMC) and our Medical Library than follow this link and click at the video (Voetballers in vergetelheid). Takes less than 4 minutes.

No surprise that Arjan, who is father of 4 kids, wants to become a sports doctor.

(Notably Arjan seems to read mostly books, whereas most students are behind the pc)

Special thanks to my collegue Marjan of Bidocblog for providing me the link.

http://voetbal.nos.nl/nieuws/artikel/ID/tcm:45-429888/

———————–

Ex-voetballer nu geneeskunde student: opnames in AMC-bibliotheek!

Arjan de Zeeuw heeft zijn studie geneeskunde weer opgepakt na een lange onderbreking als voetballer in de Engelse voetbalcompetitie. Hij is nu te zien in een serie van de NOS: ‘vergeten voetballers’.

Arjan is inmiddels vader van 4 kinderen, heeft zo te zien een aardig woonstekje en tuft elke dag heen en weer naar het AMC. Hij wil graag sportarts worden.

Het leuke is nu dat de opnames in het AMC en met name in onze bieb gemaakt zijn. Dus wil je daar een indruk van krijgen en/of wil je graag iets meer weten over Arjan als medische student, kijk dan naar de volgende video (klik op de tekst naast het oranje-witte pijltje). Tussen 2 haakjes wel opvallend dat hij vooral boeken erop naslaat en niet achter de computer in het digitorium zit.

Met speciale dank aan mijn collega Marjan van het Bidocblog die me op de link gewezen heeft.

http://voetbal.nos.nl/nieuws/artikel/ID/tcm:45-429888/





MLA 2008: connections (and Spoetnik)

22 05 2008

The annual meeting of the Medical Library Association (MLA) that took place this week in Chicago focused on the future of librarianship and (thus) on connections:

Only connect!…Only connect the prose and the passion… Live in fragments no longer…Only connect.”

—E. M. Forster, Howards End (1910)

Well connecting that’s what they do, the US-librarians. No off-season. In line with the theme of MLA’08 they keep on blogging and connecting even when at a meeting.

It seems like most tools we learned during the Spoetnik-course (weeks #1-#13) (see about and the Dutch Spoetnik-program ) were applied by the advanced medical-library-bloggers.

15 Bloggers were invited by mail (#1) to become “official conference bloggers” (#2) for MLA 2008, including Michelle Kraft, David Rothman and Eric Schnell. In addition there was at least one unofficial MLA-blogger.

Their posts were displayed on an official Wetpaint-Wiki (#9), whereas David Rothman pulled together an aggregated Yahoo Pipes feed (#3) of all the MLA postings using Feedburner. I took a subscription, but still have to screen it (way behind again).

Of course all bloggers already are del.ici.ous (#7), do their librarything (#5), stumble upon, digg it (#13) and LinkedIn (#10).

Some bloggers shared their agenda using google calendar (#8), or made some appointments by mail (#1) or chatting(#4) and there was also a MLA twitter + feed (#13, #3). Unfortunately there was far less twittering, tweetering and blogging (#13) and thus far less connections than planned, because according to the kraftylibrarian “there was no freaking network on which to be social..” (No wireless access). Bit stupid for a meeting on networks…… :(

In addition there was a MLA-flickr-group (#6) , and some bloggers placed a you tube-(#13) or other video- or podcast (#11) on their blog. I will copy (share) one in the next post.

Interested in more: well (if you are a MLA-member?!) you can watch a live Video Webcast on the first plenary session on “Web 2.0 Tools for Librarians: Description, Demonstration, Discussion, and Debate”.

Alas I’m not, but several video’s, links and posts on the blogs mentioned above are informative as well -and freely available-. See for instance the blogs that I read (and consulted for this post):

Michelle Kraft – The Krafty Librarian

David Rothman – davidrothman.net

Eric Schnell – The Medium is the Message

tunaiskewl? ratcatcher? – omg tuna is kewl






BMI bijeenkomst april 2008

21 04 2008

Afgelopen vrijdag 18 April was de Landelijke Dag BMI, CCZ, PBZ en WEB&Z. De BMI is afdeling Biomedische Informatie van de Nederlandse Vereniging voor Beroepsbeoefenaren (NVB). De andere afkortingen staan voor werkgroepen/commissies binnen de NVB: CCZ = Centrale Catalogus Ziekenhuisbibliotheken, BPZ = Bibliothecarissen van Psychiatrische Zorginstellingenen en WEB&Z = voorheen Biomedische werkgroep VOGIN.

Het programma bestond uit 3 ALV’s, van de CCZ, de BPZ en de BMI, afgewisseld met 3 lezingen. Een beetje lastig 3 ALV’s en 1 zaal. Dat betekende in mijn geval dat ik wel de BMI-ALV heb bijgewoond, maar tijdens de andere ALV’s (langdurig) in de koffieruimte annex gang moest wachten. Weliswaar heb ik die nuttig en plezierig doorgebracht, maar het zou wat gestroomlijnder kunnen. Ook vond ik het bijzonder jammer dat er nauwelijks een plenaire discussie was na de lezingen en dat men geacht werd de discussie letterlijk in de wandelgang voort te zetten. En stof tot discussie was er…..

Met name de eerste lezing deed de nodige stof opwaaien. Helaas heb ik deze voor de helft gemist, omdat ik in het station Hilversum dat van Amersfoort meende te herkennen ;) . Gelukkig heeft Ronald van Dieën op zijn blog ook de BMI-dag opgetekend, zodat ik de eerste punten van hem kan overnemen.

De eerste spreker was Geert van der Heijden, Universitair hoofddocent Klinische Epidemiologie bij het Julius Centrum voor Gezondheidswetenschappen van het UMC Utrecht. Geert is coördinator van het START-blok voor zesdejaars (Supervised Training in professional Attitude, Research and Teaching) en van de Academische Vaardigheden voor het GNK Masteronderwijs. Ik kende Geert oppervlakkig, omdat wij (afzonderlijk) geinterviewd waren voor het co-assistenten blad “Arts in Spe” over de integratie van het EBM-zoekonderwijs in het curriculum. Nu ik hem hier in levende lijve heb gehoord, lees ik zijn interview met heel andere ogen. Ik zag toen meer de overeenkomsten, nu de verschillen.

Zijn presentatie had als titel: “hoe zoekt de clinicus?”. Wie verwachtte dat Geert zou vertellen hoe de gemiddelde clinicus daadwerkelijk zoekt komt komt bedrogen uit. Geert vertelde vooral de methode van zoeken die hij artsen aanleert/voorhoudt. Deze methode is bepaald niet ingeburgerd en lijkt diametraal te staan tegenover de werkwijze van medisch informatiespecialisten, per slot zijn gehoor van dat moment. Alleen al het feit dat hij beweert dat je VOORAL GEEN MeSH moet gebruiken druist in tegen wat wij medisch informatiespecialisten leren en uitdragen. Het is de vraag of de zaal zo stil was, omdat zij overvallen werd door al het schokkends wat er gezegd werd of omdat men niet wist waar te beginnen met een weerwoord. Ik zag letterlijk een aantal monden openhangen van verbazing.

Zoals Ronald al stelde was dit een forse knuppel in het hoenderhok van de ‘medisch informatiespecialisten’. Ik deel echter niet zijn mening dat Geert het prima kon onderbouwen met argumenten. Hij is weliswaar een begenadigd spreker en bracht het allemaal met verve, maar ik had toch sterk de indruk dat zijn aanpak vooral practice- of eminence- en niet evidence-based was.

Hieronder enkele van zijn stellingen, 1ste 5 overgenomen van Ronald:

  1. “Een onderzoeker probeert publicatie air miles te verdienen met impact factors”
  2. “in Utrecht krijgen de studenten zo’n 500 uur Clinical Epidemiology en Evidence Based Practice, daar waar ze in Oxford (roots van EBM) slechts 10 uur krijgen”
  3. “contemporary EBM tactics (Sicily statement). (zie bijvoorbeeld hier:….)
  4. “fill knowledge gaps met problem solving skills”
  5. EBM = eminence biased medicine. Er zit veel goeds tussen, maar pas op….
  6. Belangrijkste doelstelling van literatuuronderzoek: reduceer Numbers Needed to Read.
  7. Vertrouw nooit 2e hands informatie (dit noemen wij voorgefilterde of geaggregeerde evidence) zoals TRIP, UpToDate, Cochrane Systematic Reviews, BMJ Clinical Evidence. Men zegt dat de Cochrane Systematic Reviews zo goed zijn, maar éen verschuiving van een komma heeft duizenden levens gekost. Lees en beoordeel dus de primaire bronnen!
  8. De Cochrane Collaboration houdt zich alleen maar bezig met systematische reviews van interventies, het doet niets aan de veel belangrijker domeinen “diagnose” en “prognose”.
  9. PICO (patient, intervention, comparison, outcome) werkt alleen voor therapie, niet voor andere vraagstukken.
  10. In plaats daarvan de vraag in 3 componenten splitsen: het domein (de categorie patiënten), de determinant (de diagnostische test, prognostische variabele of behandeling) en de uitkomst (ziekte, mortaliteit en …..)
  11. Zoeken doe je als volgt: bedenk voor elk van de 3 componenten zoveel mogelijk synoniemen op papier, verbind deze met “OR”, verbind de componenten met “AND”.
  12. De synoniemen alleen in titel en abstract zoeken (code [tiab]) EN NOOIT met MeSH (MEDLINE Subject Headings). MeSH zijn NOOIT bruikbaar volgens Geert. Ze zijn vaak te breed, ze zijn soms verouderd en je vindt er geen recente artikelen mee, omdat de indexering soms 3-12 maanden zou kosten.
  13. NOOIT Clinical Queries gebruiken. De methodologische filters die in PubMed zijn opgenomen, de zogenaamde Clinical Queries zijn enkel gebaseerd op MeSH en daarom niet bruikbaar. Verder zijn ze ontwikkeld voor heel specifieke onderwerpsgebieden, zoals cardiologie, en daarom niet algemeen toepasbaar.
  14. Volgens de Cochrane zou je als je een studie ‘mist’ de auteurs moeten aanschrijven. Dat lukt van geen kant. Beter is het te sneeuwballen via Web of Science en related articles en op basis daarvan JE ZOEKACTIE AAN TE PASSEN.

Wanneer men volgens de methode van der Heijden werkt zou men in een half uur klaar zijn met zoeken en in 2 uur de artikelen geselecteerd en beoordeeld hebben. Nou dat doe ik hem niet na.

De hierboven in rood weergegeven uitspraken zijn niet (geheel) juist. 8. Therapie is naar mijn bescheiden mening nog steeds een belangrijk domein; daarnaast is gaat de Cochrane Collaboration ook SR’s over diagnostische accuratesse studies schrijven. 13. in clinical queries worden (juist) niet alleen MeSH gebruikt.

In de groen weergegeven uitspraken kan ik me wel (ten dele) vinden, maar ze zijn niet essentieel verschillend van wat ik (men?) zelf nastreef(t)/doe(t), en dat wordt wel impliciet gesuggereerd.
Vele informatiespecialisten zullen ook:

  • 6 nastreven (door 7 te doen weliswaar),
  • 9 benadrukken (de PICO is inderdaad voor interventies ontwikkeld en minder geschikt voor andere domeinen)
  • en deze analoog aan 10 opschrijven (zij het dat we de componenten anders betitelen).
  • Het aanschrijven van auteurs (14) gebeurt als uiterste mogelijkheid. Eerst doen we de opties die door Geert als alternatief aangedragen worden: het sneeuwballen met als doel de zoekstrategie aan te passen. (dit weet ik omdat ik zelf de cursus “zoeken voor Cochrane Systematic Reviews” geef).

Als grote verschillen blijven dan over: (7) ons motto: geaggregeerde evidence eerst en (12) zoeken met MeSH versus zoeken in titel en abstract en het feit dat alle componenten met AND verbonden worden, wat ik maar mondjesmaat doe. Want: hoe meer termen/componenten je met “AND” combineert hoe groter de kans dat je iets mist. Soms moet het, maar je gaat niet a priori zo te werk.

Ik vond het een beetje flauw dat Geert aanhaalde dat er door één Cochrane reviewer een fout is gemaakt, waardoor er duizenden doden zouden zijn gevallen. Laat hij dan ook zeggen dat door het initiatief van de Cochrane er levens van honderd duizenden zijn gered, omdat eindelijk goed in kaart is gebracht welke therapieën nu wel en welke nu niet effectief zijn. Bij alle studies geldt dat je afhankelijk bent van hoe goed te studie is gedaan, van een juiste statistiek etcetera. Voordeel van geaggregeerde evidence is nu net dat een arts niet alle oorspronkelijke studies hoeft door te lezen om erachter te komen wat werkt (NNR!!!). Stel dat elke arts voor elke vraag ALLE individuele studies moet zoeken, beoordelen en moet samenvatten….. Dat zou, zoals de Cochrane het vaak noemt ‘duplication of effort’ zijn. Maar wil je precies weten hoe het zit, of wil je heel volledig zijn dan zul je inderdaad zelf de oorspronkelijke studies moeten zoeken en beoordelen.
Wel grappig trouwens dat 22 van de 70 artikelen waarvan Geert medeauteur is tot de geaggregeerde evidence (inclusief Cochrane Reviews) gerekend kunnen worden….. Zou hij de lezers ook afraden deze artikelen te selecteren? ;)

Voor wat betreft het zoeken via de MeSH. Ik denk dat weinig ‘zoekers’ louter en alleen op MeSH zoeken. Wij gebruiken ook tekstwoorden. In hoeverre er gebruik van gemaakt wordt hangt erg van het doel en de tijd af. Je moet steeds afwegen wat de voor- en de nadelen zijn. Door geen MeSH te gebruiken, maak je ook geen gebruik van de synoniemen functie en de mogelijkheid tot exploderen (nauwere termen meenemen). Probeer maar eens in een zoekactie alle synoniemen voor kanker te vinden: cancer, cancers , tumor, tumour(s), neoplasm(s), malignancy (-ies), maar daarnaast ook alle verschilende kankers: adenocarcinoma, lymphoma, Hodgkin’s disease, etc. Met de MeSH “Neoplasms” vind je in een keer alle spellingswijzen, synoniemen en alle soorten kanker te vinden.

Maar in ieder geval heeft Geert ons geconfronteerd met een heel andere zienswijze en ons een spiegel voorgehouden. Het is soms goed om even wakkergeschud te worden en na te denken over je eigen (soms te ?) routinematige aanpak. Geert ging niet de uitdaging uit de weg om de 2 zoekmethodes met elkaar te willen vergelijken. Dus wie weet wat hier nog uit voortvloeit. Zouden we tot een consensus kunnen komen?

De volgende praatjes waren weliswaar minder provocerend, maar toch zeker de moeite waard.

De web 2.0-goeroe Wouter Gerritsma (WoWter) praatte ons bij over web 2.0, zorg 2.0 en (medische) bibliotheek 2.0. Zeer toepasselijk met zeer moderne middelen: een powerpointpresentatie via slideshare te bewonderen en met een WIKI, van waaruit hij steeds enkele links aanklikte. Helaas was de internetverbinding af en toe niet zo 2.0, zodat bijvoorbeeld deze beeldende YOU TUBE-uitleg Web 2.0 … The machine is us/ing us niet afgespeeld kon worden. Maar handig van zo’n wiki is natuurlijk dat je het alsnog kunt opzoeken en afspelen. In de presentatie kwamen wat practische voorbeelden aan de orde (bibliotheek, zorg, artsen) en werd ingegaan op de verschillende tools van web 2.0: RSS, blogs, gepersonaliseerde pagina’s, tagging en wiki’s. Ik was wel even apetrots dat mijn blog alsmede dat van de bibliotheker even als voorbeeld getoond werden van beginnende (medische bieb) SPOETNIKbloggers. De spoetnikcursus en 23 dingen werden sowieso gepromoot om te volgen als beginner. Voor wie meer wil weten, kijk nog eens naar de wiki: het biedt een mooi overzicht.

Als laatsten hielden Tanja van Bon en Sjors Clemens een duo-presentatie over e-learning. Als originele start begonnen ze met vragen te stellen in plaats van ermee te eindigen. Daarna gaven ze een leuke introductie over e-learning en lieten ze zien hoe ze dit in hun ziekenhuis implementeerden.

Tussen en na de lezingen was er ruim tijd om met elkaar van gedachten te wisselen, aan het slot zelfs onder genot van een borrel voor wie niet de BOB was. Zeker een heel geslaagde dag. Hier ga ik vaker naar toe!

**************************************************************************************************

met de W: ik zie dat de bibliotheker inmiddels ook een stukje heeft geschreven over de lezing van Geert van der Heiden. Misschien ook leuk om dit te lezen.

N.B. VOOR WIE DE HELE PRESENTATIE VAN GEERT WIL ZIEN, DEZE IS MET ZIJN TOESTEMMING GEZET OP

http://www.slideshare.net/llkool/bmi-18-april-2008-geert-van-der-heijden/





Met losse handen publicaties scoren

29 03 2008

losse handen

(naar Bericht in “Status”, maart 2008, Ernst Koelman)

De UvA is doorgedrongen tot de top 50 van ‘s werelds meest productieve universiteiten. Dat komt mede doordat de ‘output’ van het AMC voor het eerst is meegeteld.

Dit heeft alles te maken met de nieuwe electronische registratie van onze Medische Bibliotheek.

Voorheen moesten afdelingen elk jaar zelf een lijst met publicaties aanleveren. Dat gebeurde ‘handmatig’ door Pubmed af te struinen. Overzichten waren zelden compleet of werden soms niet eens ingeleverd. Een volledige registratie is belangrijk, omdat aan de hand van die gegevens in- en extern de wetenschappelijke output bepaald wordt.

Sinds 2007 verzamelt de bibliotheek de gegevens zelf. Met een programma worden automatisch publicaties met het AMC-adres uit PubMed en Web of Science gevist. 85% van de 3000 publicaties wordt daarmee gevangen. De publicaties die gemist zijn, kunnen door de afdeling handmatig worden toegevoegd. Op de bibliotheek-homepage (intern) zijn de recente publicaties te vinden, te rangschikken per auteur of afdeling.

Hulde aan mijn collega’s Cees, Geert en Lieuwe!








Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 610 other followers