Medical Information Matters 2.10 is up at The Search Principle Blog

16 11 2010

In case you missed it: the new edition of Medical Information Matters (edition 2.10) – formerly MedLibs Round is up at the well-known blog “Search Principles” of the equally well-known Dean Giustini, a knowledgeable, helpful and friendly Canadian medical librarian, one of the first bloggers, a web 2.0 pioneer, author of many papers (like this one in the BMJ), main contributor to the UBC Health Library Wiki, educator and expert in EBM. Need I say more?

With a wink to the name of the blog carnival, Dean gave his post the title: Medical Blogging Matters: A Carnival of Ideas, November 2010

And indeed, his post is a real ode to medical bloggers and medical blogging

Dean:

With the rise of Twitter, and the emphasis placed on ‘real time’ idea-sharing and here-I-am visibility on the social web, I often wonder where blogging (all kinds) will be in five years. Perhaps it’s a dying art form.

However, this month, the ‘art of blogging’ seems to be in ample evidence throughout the medical blogosphere and the array of postings illustrates a vast diversity of approaches and opinions. In the posts mentioned, you’ll recognize many of the top names in medical blogging – these dedicated, talented professionals continue to work hard at updating their blogs regularly while carrying on with their work as medical librarians, informaticists and physicians.

Dean started his post by saying

It’s my great honour to be this month’s host for Medical Information Matters — the official name for the medical blog carnival (formerly MedLibs Round) where the “best blog posts in the field of medical information” are shared by prominent bloggers. I am very proud to consider many of these bloggers to be my colleagues and friends.”

But the honor is all mine! I’m glad I finally “dared” to ask him to host this blog carnival and that he accepted it without hesitation. And I, too, consider many of these bloggers, including Dean, to be my colleagues and friends. (Micro)blogging has made the world smaller…

Here are a few tweets mentioning this edition of the blog carnival, showing that it is widely appreciated (see more here):

  1. Dean Giustini
    giustini Here comes “Medical Blogging Matters: A Carnival of Ideas, November 2010″ http://bit.ly/aDzkLT [did I miss anyone? let me know]
  2. Francisco J Grajales
  3. westr
    westr Some big names in there! RT @pfanderson Medical blogging MATTERS http://bit.ly/aDzkLT
  4. Ves Dimov, M.D.
    DrVes Medical Information Matters: the weekly best of related blog posts http://goo.gl/sBgw2
  5. Kevin Clauson

this quote was brought to you by quoteurl

Next month Medical Information Matters will be hosted by another well known blogger: Martin Fenner of Gobblydook. Martin’s blog belonged to the Nature Network, but it was recently moved to the PLOS blog network.

According to the about section:

Martin Fenner works as a medical doctor and cancer researcher at the Hannover Medical School Cancer Center in Germany. He is writing about how the internet is changing scholarly communication. Martin can be found on Twitter as @mfenner.

So it seems that Martin combines 3 professions, that of a doctor, researcher, and a medical information specialist. This promises a wonderful round again.

The deadline for submission is Saturday December 4th (or perhaps even Sunday 5th).

The theme, if any, is not known yet. However, you can ALWAYS submit the URL/permalink of a recent, good quality post at:

http://blogcarnival.com/bc/submit_6092.html

(keep in touch, because we will write a call for submissions post later)

Finally a request to you all:

For 2011, I’m looking for new hosts, be it scientists, researchers, librarians, physicians or other health care workers, people who have hosted this blog carnival before, or not, people who have a longstanding reputation as blogger as well as people who just started blogging. It doesn’t matter, as long as you have a blog and you like hosting this blog carnival.

Please comment below or mail me at laika dot spoetnik at gmail dot com





Expert Curators, WisdomCards & The True Wisdom of @organizedwisdom

9 11 2010

Note added 2010-11-12:  Anyone who wishes to can now email info@organizedwisdom.com to let his/her profile as expert curator removed from the site of Organized Wisdom (see comments by Unity Stoakes, Co-founder OrganizedWisdom)

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Twitter and other Social Media can be full of random rubbish, but can also contain useful information. Personally, I use Twitter for work-related tweets about 95 percent of the time, and I choose the people I follow carefully so that I’m not overwhelmed by a flood of tweets. As I’ve said before: people who I follow are my human filter to the Twitter Noise. And I hope that is vice versa.

Organized Wisdom (http://organizedwisdom.com and @organizedwisdom on Twitter) is a 3-4 year old company that uses a similar approach to filter useful health information out of the daily junk.

Or as Steve Krein, CEO of Organized Wisdom tells Matthew Holt of the Health Care Blog in an interview (video below)

Organized Wisdom has created a new way for people to use the internet to solve their health problems by using experts. We think experts are the missing gap between two worlds: heavily simplified health encyclopedias & dictionaries and complex stuff on the internet (where you are quickly overwhelmed by all the health stuff).

OrganizedWisdom® uses WisdomCards™ , a unique service which helps people easily discover great links, curated by experts and organized by topic.

In principle this is an excellent idea, and that is why I originally joined Organized Wisdom.

I have a badge on my blog and I’m a so-called expert curator and contributor for Medical Education and Medical Librarian (topics)

Profile now removed from Organized Wisdom (2010-11-11)

Profile now removed from Organized Wisdom (2010-11-11)

So far so good. Besides being a creator of content (which is nothing more than being a source for automatically created links present in my health-care related tweets), I’m also a “consumer”. Because I’m interested in Endocrinology I follow @EndocrinologyOW on Twitter. There are many other OW topics on Twitter, that you can follow.

Recently Organized Wisdom launched a new account @ActivityDigest, which -it won’t surprise you- gives an activity digest of the curators. Apparently to stimulate “engagement” (Oh wonderful CEO-terminologies).

This is why I got this tweet in my twitter stream (I don’t follow @ActivityDigest, but I see its tweets once it mentions me).

I felt flattered: “recommended as an expert curator for Organized Wisdom“…. That sounds like any scientists could only dream of.

And before I realised it, I retweeted the message (repeated the message to my twitter stream).

Immediately I felt a bit uncomfortable. And this feeling grew as I saw almost everybody in my Twitter stream being labeled as an “Expert Curator”. … and everybody retweeting his/her “pat on the back” and congratulating each other….

I don’t have the original retweets, but a search for “Expert Curator” shows that last weeks “expert-curator”-retweets still continue

  1. American Heart Assoc
    American_Heart Thanks! RT @ActivityDigest @American_Heart was recommended as an Expert Curator for quality links, expertise. Congrats!…
  2. Rudi'sGlutenFree
    rudisglutenfree Cool! RT @ActivityDigest: @rudisglutenfree recommended as Expert Curator 4 quality links, expertise. http://bit.ly/9IOHME @OrganizedWisdom
  3. EndlessBeauty.com
    _EndlessBeauty Oh wow thank you @ActivityDigest!! We appreciate the recommendation for an Expert Curator :) @organizedwisdom
  4. Michael Bermant, MD
    DrBermant Michael Bermant, MD – OrganizedWisdom Contributor Profile http://bit.ly/99hDES Learn why he is an Expert Curator, see links he has shared.
  5. shade gardener
    shadegardener @ActivityDigest Wow, I never heard of Expert Curator for quality links before, thanks for letting me know I was awarded! :-)
  6. Bamboo Inspiration
    bambooinspired @ActivityDigest Hi and thanks for the Expert Curator for quality links mention! That’s really appreciated
  7. BMJ Group
    BMJ_Group Thanks :o) RT @ActivityDigest: @BMJ_Group was recommended as an Expert Curator for quality links, expertise. Congrats! http://bit.ly/an2Vio
  8. Imagine Nursing
    ImagineNursing Nursing Tweets: BMJ_Group: Thanks :o) RT @ActivityDigest: @BMJ_Group was recommended as an Expert Curator for qu… http://bit.ly/954uDQ

this quote was brought to you by quoteurl

Note (1) the real surprise of some people (Wow, I never heard of Expert Curator for quality links before) and (2) the chaff (endless beauty) between the wheat ((BMJ_GroupAmerican_Heart). I mean: if some of these accounts would start following me, I would probably block them and report them for spam! Really!

Activity Digest  continues its activities. Now everybody knows he or she is a curator,  it tweets what the curators have achieved this week. Probably OW is hoping curators retweet their achievements and spread the word for them. We are not only used as living filters, but even more so as “living ads”!

It made me frown, but the worst thing that struck me today is that the twittered information isn’t really filtered for quality. About a quarter is what I would call SCAM or at least CRAP.

Look on which WisdomCardI land on when I follow a tweet “Tired Of Fake Anti-aging Creams? (Try HGH Energizer”): rubbish by natural healers etc (spread by @EndocrinologyOW)
Similar cards are antiaging medicine that gets at the hormone causessupplements for diabetes support and what about the Type  2 Diabetes Natural Treatment-card. Cinnamon as treatment? Anyone? And of course there are also chiropractor WisdomCard™ cards where “expert curators share great links about chiropractor”.

Part of the problem may be that Organized Wisdom doesn’t only share links from “Health Centers”, but also from Wellness Centers (AgingDietExercise & Fitness etc) and Living Centers (BeautyCookingEnvironment). Apparently one card can have information for 2 or 3 centers (diabetes and multivitamins for example)

I feel used.

Organized Wisdom uses the credibility of me and other curators, including so-called “top expert curators” as Dr Pho (Kevin MD – blog), to cover up the incredibility of others, with the intention to lure users in.

Who doesn’t believe top curators like the ones below? Who doesn’t want to be considered one?

Going through the “expert curator” Twitter search, I saw (only) one very sensible man, EdBennett, who manages web sites for a large academic medical center and creates overviews of social media usage by hospitals. Friendly, he asked to be removed from the Expert Curator list.

I think I will try the same, although (considering the answer of dr Ves), that may not be a sinecure.

Perhaps we can try a concerted action. You know, the power of the crowd….

  1. Ed Bennett
    EdBennett Dear @OrganizedWisdom – please remove me as an “Expert Curator” from your site. Thank you.
  2. Ves Dimov, M.D.
    DrVes @EdBennett I tried this several times but I don’t think it worked… :)
  3. Ed Bennett
    EdBennett @DrVes I like to start by asking nicely.

this quote was brought to you by quoteurl

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Added 2010-11-12: For more striking examples, please read the comments. (anti-quack people “recommending” homeopathy treatment of cancer; dr ves -true expert on asthma beaten by the author of slim-fit-health.info/newsletters/fat-loss-now/…..

Added 2010-11-12: I found a 2 year old post from TechCrunch called OrganizedWisdom, the “Mahalo For Health”, Raises $2.3 Million. Some of the commenters came to the same conclusions (why didn’t anybody pick this up? Vanity? Trust? Ignorance? -this also applies to me I must admit):

Like this one from @Holly (emphasis mine)

I am glad you brought up the “written by people who do not have a clue, let alone ANY medical training [of any kind] at all.” I have no experience with any kind of medical education, knowledge or even the slightest clue of a tenth of the topics covered on OW, yet for some reason they tried to recruit me to review cards there!?! That was my first impression of the company, if they have a bunch of people like me as the final word on their cards, the info will be so off base the site will give the big fail so quick. In my opinion, medical knowledge or advice is not something I would trust from any random joe, so why would I trust anything from random people who work there, considering they have absolutely no experience or knowledge? They advertise that a doctor reviews every card, personally I think that is a bunch of BS, considering neither me nor others that I know work higher up there have any training whatsoever, guess anyone can be a doctor now…

And Josh,

You are correct about some health sites’ contents written by people with limited or non-existent medical knowledge or training; the public at large do not know this. In fact, one of my neighbors, a “MA” or “Medical Assistant,” writes for OrganizedWisdom.com.





Friday Foolery #36 : Friends on Facebook

15 10 2010

I found this hilarious South Park video about Facebook Friends on Jud’s Education Emporium.

It was used to illustrate that “friending” doesn’t mean a lot, although in this video it does mean an awful lot to some real-life friends of Stan.

In real life this happens too. See Paul’s “outpouring” on Facebook…..

(relatie=relation(ship))

Paul has a relation (on Facebook)

 





Kaleidoscope 2: 2010 wk 31

8 08 2010

Almost a year ago I started a new series Kaleidoscope, with a “kaleidoscope” of facts, findings, views and news gathered over the last 1-2 weeks.
It never got beyond the first edition. Perhaps the introduction of this Kaleidoscope was to overwhelming & dazzling: lets say it was very rich in content. Or as
Andrew Spong tweeted: “Part cornucopia, part cabinet of wonders, it’s @laikas Kaleidoscope 2009 wk 47″

This is  a reprise in a (somewhat) “shorter” format. Lets see how it turns out.

This edition will concentrate on Social Media (Blogging, Twitter Google Wave). I fear that I won’t keep my promise, if I deal with more topics.

Medical Grand Rounds and News from the Blogosphere

Life in the Fast Lane is the host of this weeks Grand Rounds. This edition is truly terrific, if not terrifying. Not only does it contain “killer posts”, each medblogger has also been coupled to its preferred deadly Aussie critter.
Want to know how a full time ER-doctor/educator/textbook author/blogger/editor /health search engine director manages to complete work-related tasks …when the kids are either at school or asleep(!), then read this recent interview with Mike Cadogan, the founder of Life in the Fast Lane.

Don’t forget to submit your medical blog post to next weeks Grand Rounds over at Dispatch From Second Base. Instructions and theme details can be found on the post “You are invited to Grand Rounds!“ (update here).

And certainly don’t forget to submit your post related to medical information to the MedLibs Round (about medical information) here. More details can be found at Laika’s MedLibLog and at Highlight Health, the host of the upcoming Edition.
(sorry, writing this post took longer than I thought: you have one day left for submission)

Dr Shock of the blog with the same name advises us to submit good quality, easy-to-understand posts dealing with science, environment or medicine to Scientia Pro Publica via the blog carnival submission form.

There is a new on-line science blogging community – Scientopia, till now mostly consisting of bloggers who left Scienceblogs after (but not because of) Pepsigate. New members can only be added to the collective by invitation (?). Obviously, pepsi-researchers will not be invited, but it remains to be seen who will…  Hopefully it doesn’t become an elitist club.
Virginia Heffernan (NY-Times) has an outspoken opinion about the (ex-) sciencebloggers, illustrated by this one-liner

“ScienceBlogs has become Fox News for the religion-baiting, peak-oil crowd.”

Although I don’t appreciate the ranting-style of some of the blogs myself (the sub-“South Park” blasphemy style of PZ Myers, as Virginia puts it). I don’t think most Scienceblogs deserve to be labelled as “preoccupied with trivia, name-calling and saber rattling”.
See balanced responses at: NeurodojoNeuron Culture & Neuroanthropology (anything with neuro- makes sense, I guess).
Want to understand more about ScienceBlogs and why it was such a terrific community, then read Bora Z’s (rather long) ScienceBlog farewell post.

Oh.. and there is yet another new science blogging platform: http://www.labspaces.net/, that has evolved from a science news aggregator . It looks slick.

Social Media

Speaking about Twitter, did you know that  Twitter reached its 20 billionth tweet over the weekend, a milestone that came just a few months after hitting the 10 billion tweet mark!? (read more in the Guardian)

Well and if you have no idea WHAT THE FUCK IS MY SOCIAL MEDIA “STRATEGY”? you might click the link to get some (new) ideas. You probably need to refresh the site a couple of times to find the right answer.

First-year medical school and master’s of medicine students of Stanford University will receive an i-pad at the start of the year. The extremely tech-savvy Students do appreciate the gift:

“Especially in medicine, we’re using so many different resources, including all the syllabuses and slides. I’m able to pull them up and search them whenever I need to. It’s a fantastic idea.”

Good news for Facebook friends: VoIP giant Vonage has just introduced a new iPhone, iPod touch and Android app that allows users to call their Facebook friends for free (Mashable).

It was a shock – or wasn’t it – that Google pulled the plug on Google Wave (RRW), after being available to the general public for only 78 days?  The unparalleled tool that “could change the web”, but was too complex to be understood. Here are some thoughts why Google wave failed.  Since much of the Code is open source, ambitious developers may pick up where Google left.

Votes down for the social media site Digg.com: an undercover investigation has exposed that a group of influential conservative members were involved in censorship, deliberately trying to ban progressives, by “burying them” (voting down), which effectively means these progressives don’t get enough “digs” to reach the front page where most users spend their time.

Votes up for Healthcare Social Media Europe (#HCSMEU), which just celebrated its first birthday.

Miscellanous

A very strange move: a journal has changed a previously stated conclusion of a previously published paper after a Reuters Health story about serious shortcomings in the report. Read more about it at Gary Schwitzer’s HealthNewsReview Blog.

Finally for the EBM-addicts among us: The Center of Evidence Based Medicine released a new (downloadable) Levels of Evidence Table. At the CEBM-blog they stress that hierarchies of evidence have been somewhat inflexibly used, but are essentially a heuristic, or short-cut to finding the likely best evidence. At first sight the new Table looks simpler, and more easy to use.

Are you a Twitter user? Tweet this!





Friday Foolery #24 Social Media Revolution 2, Right Here Right Now

21 05 2010

People who still think Social media is a fad, should watch this video…..

Social Media Revolution 2 is an update of the original video with compelling social media statistics.

Social Media Revolution was created by the author Erik Qualman to promote his book Socialnomics: How Social Media has changed the way we live and do business.

The music from Fat Boy Slim (“right here, right now”) is electric (might be another reason to watch it).

Hattip: my colleague René Spijker, seen on the Salt Magazine page on Facebook





Reclaim your Privacy on Facebook using a Simple Bookmarklet

20 05 2010

Of all social networking sites, Facebook causes the greatest privacy concerns. Certainly since it has changed its privacy options over time.

In the beginning, Facebook restricted the visibility of a user’s personal information to just their friends and their “network”, but the default privacy settings have become much more permissive, as you can see in the video below.
This short video is based on a visualization made by Matt McKeon and gives only an impression of a work-in-progress
(for up to date info check the original animation at http://mattmckeon.com/facebook-privacy/).

The reason? According Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg the controversial new default and permanent settings just reflect the way the world has changed, becoming more public and less private (see ReadWriteWeb).

“Default” is the key to the problems. You have to opt out to protect your privacy. However to fully protect your privacy on Facebook, you have to navigate through 50 settings with more than 170 options (see great charts at the NY Times!). Facebook’s privacy policy is longer than the American constitution!!!

Shocked by the results of the ACLU’s Facebook Quiz (see Mashable), I already changed my privacy settings last summer. Doing a simple quiz on Facebook meant everything on your profile (whether you use privacy settings or not), is available to the quiz. Even more worrying, when your friends do a quiz, everything on your profile is made available to the developers as well.

Since the default privacy settings have changed, my settings needed to be adapted again. But where were the leaks in the 170 options?

Luckily there is a very simple bookmarklet Reclaim Privacy that can check and fix your profile in 2 minutes (see Mashable.com) It is very easy.

1. First go to Reclaim Privacy and drag the bookmarklet to your web browser bookmarks bar
(in the example I dragged the bookmarklet into Chrome’s bookmarks (upper arrow)

2. Go to your Facebook privacy settings and then click that bookmark (Scan for Privacy, see arrow) once you are on Facebook.

3. You will see a series of privacy scans that inspect your privacy settings and warn you about settings that might be unexpectedly public.
In my case my friends could still accidentally share my personal information. This is indicated by a red sign: “insecure.

4. So I clicked “prevent friends from sharing your data”, and in seconds this was the result:

5. I tweaked the contact information a bit (caution) by changing my contact settings, but I still would allow everyone to add me as a friend (I still have to approve, don’t I?)

Piece of cake!





A Quantitave Study suggests that Twitter is not Primarily a Social Networking Site

13 05 2010

A lot can be said about Twitter, Facebook, Linkedin and other social media. What is the best, the most useful, the most popular the most social (and has the least privacy-issues, hehe Facebook)?

You know I love Twitter. Twitter is a social networking and microblogging service that enables its users to send and read messages known as tweets. The tweets don’t exceed 140 characters, so your message must be very concise. For me Twitter is a very rich source of information and a useful networking site. But it is hard to explain that to others.

Some Most people think that individuals who twitter are just parroting others (hé this is called retweeting, guys!) or are just egocentric bores (“I eat cornflakes for dinner”).

Well, a recent quantitative study by a group of researchers at Korea’s Advanced Institute of Science and Technology suggest that they might just be right. … Or at least their data suggest Twitter may be less of a social site and more of a news site.

According to Haewoon Kwak et al this is the first quantitative Twitter study ever.

The researchers crawled the entire Twitter site and obtained 41.7 million user profiles, 1.47 billion social relations, 4,262 trending topics, and 106 million tweets. They looked at the follower-following topology, looked at the ranking by number of followers and by PageRank, analyzed the retweets and the tweets of top trending topics.

You can read the main conclusions in the power presentation below and their abstract for Proceedings of the 19th International World Wide Web (WWW) Conference, April 26-30, 2010, Raleigh NC (USA). Below the abstract you can also find links to two download files, enabling you to reanalyze the data
Going Social Now and ReadWriteWeb also give a nice overview.

What are their main conclusions:

  • Twitter is not very “social”
    • It is “I follow you”, not “lets become friends” and you don’t have to approve or follow back. Following thus means that you “just subscribe” to the tweets of that person.
    • Only 22.1% of the relationships are reciprocal, thus 77.9% of the relationships is one way, just one of two is following the other. Surprisingly, 67.6% of users on Twitter are not followed by any of the people they follow.
    • this low reciprocity is unlike all other human social networks.
  • For most tweople, Twitter is primarily a source of information, not a social networking or information dissemination platform.
    • The Majority of topics (54,3%) are headline topics
    • Few users reach a large audience directly.
    • The average path length between two people on Twitter is 4.12. This is much shorter than Stanley Milgram’s original experiment uncovering the “six degrees of separation” phenomena.
    • Any retweeted tweet is to reach an average of 1,000 users no matter what the number of followers is of the original tweet.
    • Once retweeted, a tweet gets retweeted almost instantly on next hops, signifying fast diffusion of information after the 1st retweet.

It is a beautiful study that highlights the topological characteristics of Twitter.

One word of caution. Twitter is analyzed as a whole. There are many subpopulations with their own kinetics and goals. So the majority of people may follow the news, and fans may follow a celebrity by the million, but there are (relatively) small niches on Twitter, like health and medicine (or science) that may not follow the same rules.
I daresay (guess) that more people in this niche follow each other and do use Twitter both as a source of information and as as  network for social communication.
But these small niches are outnumbered by others (news sites, CEOs, celebrities).
At least that is my hypothesis.

Who is going to test this??

Many different Twitter birds in a flock

Credits








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