Grand Rounds 5.35 at Healthcare Technology News

19 05 2009

healthcare technology News GRAND ROUND may 19Grand Rounds is up at Healthcare Technology News. This edition of Grand Rounds, the Best of the Medical Blogosphere, focuses on Health Care Reform.

The Grand Round begins with a stunning quote of type 1 diabetic blogger Kerri Sparling that really hits the mark with her post at Six Until Me:

“Why, Insurance Company, are you so against proactive care? Why do I need to pay more for a brace or a shot or an extra visit when you’re more content paying for a several thousand dollar surgery instead? Not enough bang for your buck? Why do you fight me tooth and nail against coverage for a continuous glucose monitoring device?* Is my life not worth the investment to keep my legs on instead of paying 100% to amputate them in a few decades? I know I’m expensive as a chronic disease patient, but I’m healthier than 85% of the people I know. I eat well, I exercise regularly, and I am on top of my disease. Yet you deny me life insurance, you won’t let me purchase a private health insurance policy, and you would rather see me on an operating table than taking up a doctor’s time in an office visit. (And it’s not like I’m taking up more than 5 – 7 minutes of a doctor’s time, because that’s about all we get, on average. Pathetic.)”

After a few more examples of the Patient and Consumer Perspective on why we do need reform, this edition continues with:

  • Providers, Prevention and Self-Management
  • Meaningful Use and Enabling Technology
  • Dollars and Sense
  • What’s Working Elsewhere?

Please read the whole edition here

Next Grand Round will be hosted by See First, Insights into the uncertain world of Healthcare.

————————-

* I saw the same problem mentioned on a Dutch Blog “Diabetesblog“, where the story was told of a patient who has hypo-unawareness: she can’t feel when her blood glucose is low. Therefore she suffers many complications of diabetes, i.e she has poor sight and has recently fainted in front of the children. The only thing which she feels would work is the (FDA approved) continuous glucose monitoring device (CGMS). The problem is that the her insurer won’t cover CGMS, as it’s efficacy has yet to be proved.

Coincidentally I’m gathering the evidence on “the effectiveness of the CGMS in the management of type I diabetes” for a Cochrane Protocol (not approved yet). However, it will take some time for the authors to finish the review after the protocol has been approved.

See the full Story on Diabetesblog (in Dutch) here

Some excerpts:

Sinds een jaar of vijf draagt ze daarom een insulinepomp die continue een klein beetje insuline afgeeft. ‘Maar dat zegt natuurlijk niks over mijn bloedsuikergehalte op dat moment’, zegt Judith. Meer baat zou de Losserse volgens haar internist hebben bij een continue glucosemeter met implanteerbare sensor, een apparaat dat is overgewaaid uit de Verenigde Staten. De sensor meet 24 uur per dag de bloedsuikerspiegel en geeft een waarschuwingssignaal als de waarde te laag dreigt te worden.

Het probleem is echter dat de zorgverzekeraar van Judith, Menzis, het apparaat – kosten: 40 à 50 euro per stuk; één exemplaar gaat maximaal drie dagen mee – niet wil vergoeden, ook niet nadat de internist van Judith daarop heeft aangedrongen. Te duur, oordeelt Menzis. En bovendien, zo motiveert een woordvoerder het standpunt van de zorgverzekeraar, ‘heeft het College voor zorgverzekeringen (CVZ) onlangs besloten de sensor niet te vergoeden’.

Ook een tweede verzoek dat de arts onlangs indiende heeft niets opgeleverd. Volgens de woordvoerder van Menzis is de zorgverzekeraar zelfs strafbaar als het apparaatje vergoed zou worden, omdat het onvoldoende getest zou zijn. Onzin, zegt Getkate. ‘Niet voor niets heeft de Diabetesvereniging Nederland een positief advies gegeven. Er zijn bovendien andere zorgverzekeraars die het al wèl vergoeden.’

En dus ligt de Losserse in de clinch met haar zorgverzekeraar. Wat haar nog het meeste steekt is ‘dat Menzis eigenlijk op de stoel van de arts gaat zitten’…..


Actions

Information

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s




%d bloggers like this: