New OvidSP release (planned August 5th 2008) will allow more flexible searching

5 08 2008

Update 2010-08-14: I see many people going to this post because of recent changes to OVID SP. This post is NOT about the 2010 changes. Thus I added 2008 in the title.

I wrote before (see here) that ‘OVID-SP gave me RSI’, because I had to scroll too much between last search and new command. A huge TIP-box is in the way and the last search and command bar are too far apart.

Friday, I finally decided to write to OVID’s customer service, asking them if they could do something about the TIP-box and the way the search box and search history are placed relative to each other.

The same day I got an answer from a very kind Technical Support Engineer writing:

“I am really sorry but we can not remove the Tip box. However the interface is going to change next week, the search history box will be more customizable.”

YES!
Never mind the TIP-box (for the moment).
I’m very happy that OVID does take his users seriously. This means a real step ahead for heavy OVID-users. Thanks!

He also gave me the official communication about the new release, shown below (or follow this link)

By the way the new OvidSP version 2.0 is scheduled to be launched TODAY instead of July 31st.

Want to become acquainted with the new features and functionality in the latest version of OvidSP than follow this link to register for a (webex) course (choice from 20 dates!)

Transforming the Way You Search with More Flexibility and Customization of OvidSP Workflow Tools

Dear Ovid Customer:

The next release of OvidSP on July 31st is all about flexibility and enabling users to search the way they want to search. In our third weekly email introducing what you and your users will see on July 31st, learn more about new user-configurable customization enhancements to OvidSP’s workflow tools that further deepen the search experience and help users get to the results they need quickly.

  • Search Aid – Now users can expand or collapse this search refinement feature based on their preferences for managing the results screen.
  • Search History Many users perform complex searches, some involving as many as 60-80 lines of search. Now, the Search History can be placed above or below the main search box, so there’s no need to spend time scrolling up the page to review search strategies. Plus, you can sort all your searches in either ascending or descending order so that the last search statement is always viewable.
  • Results Manager – To accommodate for a wide variety of user behavior and to minimize scrolling when it comes to managing results, the Results Manager is now located in two places, above and below the results set. You can minimize it in both places to save valuable screen real estate.

Plus, now you can customize the “common” limits—those available on the main search page. These settings will act as defaults for users who are able to login via a personal account.

Like all of the upcoming enhancements and new features, those illustrated above are based on extensive feedback from and interviews with customers and users.

Coming soon to the OvidSP Resource Center will be screenshots, an updated training schedule, Frequently Asked Questions, and more. Be sure to contact your Ovid Account Representative or support@ovid.com with any questions.

Regards,

Wolters Kluwer Health – Ovid


©2008 Ovid Technologies

Eerder schreef ik dat OVID mij RSI bezorgde, omdat ik teveel moest scrollen bij langdurige searches. Er staat een enorme “OVIDSP TIP” hinderlijk in de weg en de zoekregel staat te ver van de laatste search.

Vrijdag besloot ik eindelijk om OVID’s klantenservice te mailen. Of ze niet de tip weg konden halen en iets aan de plaatsing van zoekgeschiedenis en de zoekregel konden doen (ik verwees daarbij naar mijn blog).

Diezelfde dag nog kreeg ik antwoord van een zeer attente mijnheer van de helpdesk (die getuige latere correspondentie ook inhoudelijk het een en ander weet). Hij schreef:

“I am really sorry but we can not remove the Tip box. However the interface is going to change next week, the search history box will be more customizable.”

YES!
Laat de OVIDsp-TIP maar even zitten (voor nu).
Erg goed dat OVID zijn gebruikers serieus neemt. Ze doen tenminste wat met de feedback! De aanpassingen zijn echt een stap vooruit. Bedankt, OVID!

De officiele aankondiging van OVID staat hierboven. U kunt ook deze link volgen.

Belangrijkste punten:

  • Je kunt naar wens de zoekgeschiedenis boven of onder de zoekbalk plaatsen en de searches in opklimmende of dalende volgorde plaatsen. Deze flexibiliteit lost mijn probleem dus al grotendeels op!
  • Je kunt de “Search Aid” in- of uitklappen.
  • De “Results Manager” staat nu zowel boven als onder de zoekresultaten en kunnen ook weer ingeklapt worden. Hierdoor hoef je ook weer minder te scrollen als je iets met de resultaten wilt doen.

Tussen 2 haakjes: De nieuwe OvidSP version 2.0 staat VANDAAG op de planning, niet 31 juli

Wil je vertrouwd raken met de laatste versie van OvidSP dan kun je je opgeven voor 1 van de 20 (!) online (webex) trainingen via deze link.





Webex meeting Clinical Evidence

26 05 2008

After I’ve learned so many new internet communication tools I’m about to discover yet another: webex.
As many other information specialists I’ve been invited to participate in a Webex meeting, organized by BMJ Clinical Evidence, a database with appr. 200 evidence based syntheses of evidence (critical appraisals of a subject). This is a kind of an online training. I have to dial in, and use the computer as well.

I’m kind of curious, because I never joined such a meeting before. I also hope to learn a lot from it. Expect that it will be rather efficient, because the training takes only 20 minutes an it will deal with the following:

“We will be showcasing the newest features that have been added to BMJ Clinical Evidence and also highlighting some of the most exciting hidden gems that your users may not know about.

What you can expect to hear about:
– Our new GRADE scoring system
– Our advanced search and browse functions
– Our published inclusion-exclusion forms for new reviews
– The extra resources that we have created for you as information specialists to help make your lives easier”

So it seems they will give as a peep behind the scenes.

Well at least I hope to take the first hurdle: being able to follow the session.





Etiquette-Based Medicine

11 05 2008

Every now and than my collegue Heleen provides me with an interesting paper (a nice web 1.0 way of sharing things). Last Friday I found this paper on my desk: “Etiquette-Based medicine” from Michael W Kahn. The paper in this week’s New England Journal of Medicine is not about the substition of “evidence based medicine” or “eminence-based medicine” by “etiquette-based medicine”. It is about the importance of a good attitude of doctors towards their patients.

When psychiatrist Dr. Khan hears patients complain about doctors, their criticism often has nothing to do with not feeling understood or empathized with. Instead, they object that “he just stared at his computer screen,” “she never smiles,” or “I had no idea who I was talking to”, he writes.
On the contrary, during his own hospitalization he noticed the professional attitude of his European-born surgeon having Old World manners (dress, body language, eye contact etc.).

“The impression this surgeon made was remarkably calming, and it helped to confirm my suspicion that patients may care less about whether their doctors are reflective and empathic than whether they are respectful and attentive”, wrote Dr. Kahn.

Therefore, Khan suggests that medical education and postgraduate training should place more emphasis on “etiquette-based medicine” as it forms the basis of the patient-doctor relationship. One approach would be to introduce a checklist to enforce an etiquette-based approach. A checklist for the first meeting with a patient would for instance cover items like ‘asking permission to enter the room and wait for an answer’, ‘introducing yourselve, showing your ID badge’ and ‘explaining you role on the team’.

This approach bears resemblance to the program introduced at several Academical Medical Centres in the Netherlands. For instance Maas Jan Heineman, nowadays Professor Gynaecology in the Amsterdam Medical Centre (AMC), Amsterdam, helped to introduce such a “etiquette program” in Groningen and in Amsterdam. The competences of the doctors and the integration of knowledge, skills and attitude are now central to the new curricula. As Heineman says it: “What good are doctors who have great knowledge but behave badly. Or vice versa”?! )

These thoughts are (of course) not specifically Dutch (nor European). The entire 2005 January issue of the British Journal of General practice focuses on this subject.

The journal issue ends with a bookreview of a UK-US guide to communicating with patients, consisting of a book ‘Skills for Communicating with Patients’ and a companion volume, ‘Teaching and Learning Communication Skills in Medicine‘, which translates the first book into a framework that can be used in designing and delivering curricula for communications skills teaching in both the academic and clinical setting.

The reviewer, Iain Lawrie, is very positive about the content:

“The layout and language are clear and unambiguous throughout. Important points are emphasised where necessary, and at no time does reading become laborious. Far more importantly, however, the authors have employed an evidence-based approach that moves these titles from the realm of personal opinion and musings to an authoritative work. The frequent use of examples further serves to promote this series as a ‘useable’ guide. (….)
The book gives examples Skills for Communicating with Patients, the authors use a logical approach to analyse the various aspects of communication relevant throughout the consultation process, which are then explored in greater depth over six chapters. They move from the initiation of a consultation (!), through information gathering, structuring, and relationship building, to the often neglected areas of explaining and planning and, finally, closing the encounter.”

Thus it seems that the awareness within the medical community about the necessity of good communication skills is growing. The tools are there, some curricula have already embraced “etiquette based medicine” (although not called by that name) and it seems just a matter of time before “etiquette” becomes an integral part of medical education.

Lets conclude with a quote from the abovementioned book, that also applies to professions other than medical:

‘If you can’t communicate, it doesn’t matter what you know’

*****************************************************************

Van mijn collega Heleen krijg ik af en toe een artikel of een krantenknipsel toegeschoven. Nog geheel op de ouderwetse web 1.0 manier, maar eigenlijk wel zo leuk. Van de week lag er een artikel in mijn postvak getiteld “Etiquette-Based medicine”, geschreven door Michael W Kahn. Ik dacht eerst “weer een zogenaamd alternatief voor “evidence based-“ of “eminence-based medicine”, maar het artikel in het laatste nummer van de New England Journal of Medicine ziet “Etiquette-Based medicine” meer als een aanvulling. Het gaat over het belang van een juiste attitude van de arts tegenover zijn patient.

De klachten die Dr. Khan als psychiater van patiënten over artsen hoort gaan meestal niet over gebrek aan empathie maar veel meer over zaken als: “hij staarde maar naar zijn computerscherm”, “er kan geen lachje af”, “ik had geen idee met wie ik nou te maken had”.

Toen Khan zelf in het ziekenhuis lag had hij precies de tegenovergestelde ervaring. De behandelend chirurg van europese herkomst kwam door zijn zogenaamde ‘Oude-Wereld’ houding (kleding, lichaamstaal, oogcontact) bijzonder professioneel en geruststellend over.

Dit sterkte Khan in zijn idee dat patiënten het veel belangrijker vinden dat hun arts hen met respect en met aandacht bejegent dan dat hij heel erg meelevend is.

Hij stelt daarom dat er in het medisch onderwijs meer aandacht moet komen voor wat hij “etiquette-based medicine” noemt, daar dit de grondslag van een goede patient-doctor relatie vormt. Een checklist zou daarbij kunnen helpen. Als een arts de patient voor het eerst ziet zou hij bijvoorbeeld eerst moeten vragen of hij welkom is en pas als de patiënt akkoord is zou hij naar binnen moeten gaan, een hand moeten geven en zich voor moeten stellen.

Iets dergelijks gebeurt reeds in diverse Nederlandse universitair medische centra. Professor Maas Jan Heineman heeft zo’n “etiquette programma” eerst in het UMCG in Groningen en nu in het AMC te Amsterdam geïnitieerd. In het nieuwe curriculum staan de competenties van de arts centraal en een integratie van kennis, vaardigheden en gedrag. Je hebt tenslotte niets aan een dokter die weliswaar veel weet, maar zich vreselijk gedraagt, of andersom”, aldus Heineman. )

Zo’n benadering is niet specifiek Nederlands, noch Europees. Een heel nummer van het British Journal of General practice (jan 2005) gaat enkel over dit onderwerp.

Het laatste artikel is een boekbespreking van een ‘UK-US gids’ over communicatievaardigheden: ‘Skills for Communicating with Patients” en een begeleidend boekje, Teaching and Learning Communication Skills in Medicine. ]

De recensent Iain Lawrie is erg positief over het boek. Het is helder geschreven en legt de juiste nadrukken. Verder stijgt het werk door de evidence-based benadering boven een opeensomming van feitjes en meningen uit. Het begeleidende boek geeft voorbeelden van hoe te handelen in bepaalde situaties, bijvoorbeeld tijdens het eerste consult. Het boek omvat dus precies wat Khan suggereerde.

Het lijkt er dus op dat men zich binnen de medische wereld steeds meer bewust wordt van de noodzaak van goede communicatievaardigheden. Er zijn al ‘leermethoden’ beschikbaar en in enkele curriculums is etiquette based medicine reeds verweven (zij het onder een andere naam). Het is slechts een kwestie van tijd voordat etiquette een vanzelfsprekend onderdeel van de medische vorming is.

Tot slot een citaat uit het eerder aangehaalde boek (dat eigenlijk op veel meer beroepen van toepassing is):

‘If you can’t communicate, it doesn’t matter what you know.’





BMI bijeenkomst april 2008

21 04 2008

Afgelopen vrijdag 18 April was de Landelijke Dag BMI, CCZ, PBZ en WEB&Z. De BMI is afdeling Biomedische Informatie van de Nederlandse Vereniging voor Beroepsbeoefenaren (NVB). De andere afkortingen staan voor werkgroepen/commissies binnen de NVB: CCZ = Centrale Catalogus Ziekenhuisbibliotheken, BPZ = Bibliothecarissen van Psychiatrische Zorginstellingenen en WEB&Z = voorheen Biomedische werkgroep VOGIN.

Het programma bestond uit 3 ALV’s, van de CCZ, de BPZ en de BMI, afgewisseld met 3 lezingen. Een beetje lastig 3 ALV’s en 1 zaal. Dat betekende in mijn geval dat ik wel de BMI-ALV heb bijgewoond, maar tijdens de andere ALV’s (langdurig) in de koffieruimte annex gang moest wachten. Weliswaar heb ik die nuttig en plezierig doorgebracht, maar het zou wat gestroomlijnder kunnen. Ook vond ik het bijzonder jammer dat er nauwelijks een plenaire discussie was na de lezingen en dat men geacht werd de discussie letterlijk in de wandelgang voort te zetten. En stof tot discussie was er…..

Met name de eerste lezing deed de nodige stof opwaaien. Helaas heb ik deze voor de helft gemist, omdat ik in het station Hilversum dat van Amersfoort meende te herkennen 😉 . Gelukkig heeft Ronald van Dieën op zijn blog ook de BMI-dag opgetekend, zodat ik de eerste punten van hem kan overnemen.

De eerste spreker was Geert van der Heijden, Universitair hoofddocent Klinische Epidemiologie bij het Julius Centrum voor Gezondheidswetenschappen van het UMC Utrecht. Geert is coördinator van het START-blok voor zesdejaars (Supervised Training in professional Attitude, Research and Teaching) en van de Academische Vaardigheden voor het GNK Masteronderwijs. Ik kende Geert oppervlakkig, omdat wij (afzonderlijk) geinterviewd waren voor het co-assistenten blad “Arts in Spe” over de integratie van het EBM-zoekonderwijs in het curriculum. Nu ik hem hier in levende lijve heb gehoord, lees ik zijn interview met heel andere ogen. Ik zag toen meer de overeenkomsten, nu de verschillen.

Zijn presentatie had als titel: “hoe zoekt de clinicus?”. Wie verwachtte dat Geert zou vertellen hoe de gemiddelde clinicus daadwerkelijk zoekt komt komt bedrogen uit. Geert vertelde vooral de methode van zoeken die hij artsen aanleert/voorhoudt. Deze methode is bepaald niet ingeburgerd en lijkt diametraal te staan tegenover de werkwijze van medisch informatiespecialisten, per slot zijn gehoor van dat moment. Alleen al het feit dat hij beweert dat je VOORAL GEEN MeSH moet gebruiken druist in tegen wat wij medisch informatiespecialisten leren en uitdragen. Het is de vraag of de zaal zo stil was, omdat zij overvallen werd door al het schokkends wat er gezegd werd of omdat men niet wist waar te beginnen met een weerwoord. Ik zag letterlijk een aantal monden openhangen van verbazing.

Zoals Ronald al stelde was dit een forse knuppel in het hoenderhok van de ‘medisch informatiespecialisten’. Ik deel echter niet zijn mening dat Geert het prima kon onderbouwen met argumenten. Hij is weliswaar een begenadigd spreker en bracht het allemaal met verve, maar ik had toch sterk de indruk dat zijn aanpak vooral practice- of eminence- en niet evidence-based was.

Hieronder enkele van zijn stellingen, 1ste 5 overgenomen van Ronald:

  1. “Een onderzoeker probeert publicatie air miles te verdienen met impact factors”
  2. “in Utrecht krijgen de studenten zo’n 500 uur Clinical Epidemiology en Evidence Based Practice, daar waar ze in Oxford (roots van EBM) slechts 10 uur krijgen”
  3. “contemporary EBM tactics (Sicily statement). (zie bijvoorbeeld hier:….)
  4. “fill knowledge gaps met problem solving skills”
  5. EBM = eminence biased medicine. Er zit veel goeds tussen, maar pas op….
  6. Belangrijkste doelstelling van literatuuronderzoek: reduceer Numbers Needed to Read.
  7. Vertrouw nooit 2e hands informatie (dit noemen wij voorgefilterde of geaggregeerde evidence) zoals TRIP, UpToDate, Cochrane Systematic Reviews, BMJ Clinical Evidence. Men zegt dat de Cochrane Systematic Reviews zo goed zijn, maar éen verschuiving van een komma heeft duizenden levens gekost. Lees en beoordeel dus de primaire bronnen!
  8. De Cochrane Collaboration houdt zich alleen maar bezig met systematische reviews van interventies, het doet niets aan de veel belangrijker domeinen “diagnose” en “prognose”.
  9. PICO (patient, intervention, comparison, outcome) werkt alleen voor therapie, niet voor andere vraagstukken.
  10. In plaats daarvan de vraag in 3 componenten splitsen: het domein (de categorie patiënten), de determinant (de diagnostische test, prognostische variabele of behandeling) en de uitkomst (ziekte, mortaliteit en …..)
  11. Zoeken doe je als volgt: bedenk voor elk van de 3 componenten zoveel mogelijk synoniemen op papier, verbind deze met “OR”, verbind de componenten met “AND”.
  12. De synoniemen alleen in titel en abstract zoeken (code [tiab]) EN NOOIT met MeSH (MEDLINE Subject Headings). MeSH zijn NOOIT bruikbaar volgens Geert. Ze zijn vaak te breed, ze zijn soms verouderd en je vindt er geen recente artikelen mee, omdat de indexering soms 3-12 maanden zou kosten.
  13. NOOIT Clinical Queries gebruiken. De methodologische filters die in PubMed zijn opgenomen, de zogenaamde Clinical Queries zijn enkel gebaseerd op MeSH en daarom niet bruikbaar. Verder zijn ze ontwikkeld voor heel specifieke onderwerpsgebieden, zoals cardiologie, en daarom niet algemeen toepasbaar.
  14. Volgens de Cochrane zou je als je een studie ‘mist’ de auteurs moeten aanschrijven. Dat lukt van geen kant. Beter is het te sneeuwballen via Web of Science en related articles en op basis daarvan JE ZOEKACTIE AAN TE PASSEN.

Wanneer men volgens de methode van der Heijden werkt zou men in een half uur klaar zijn met zoeken en in 2 uur de artikelen geselecteerd en beoordeeld hebben. Nou dat doe ik hem niet na.

De hierboven in rood weergegeven uitspraken zijn niet (geheel) juist. 8. Therapie is naar mijn bescheiden mening nog steeds een belangrijk domein; daarnaast is gaat de Cochrane Collaboration ook SR’s over diagnostische accuratesse studies schrijven. 13. in clinical queries worden (juist) niet alleen MeSH gebruikt.

In de groen weergegeven uitspraken kan ik me wel (ten dele) vinden, maar ze zijn niet essentieel verschillend van wat ik (men?) zelf nastreef(t)/doe(t), en dat wordt wel impliciet gesuggereerd.
Vele informatiespecialisten zullen ook:

  • 6 nastreven (door 7 te doen weliswaar),
  • 9 benadrukken (de PICO is inderdaad voor interventies ontwikkeld en minder geschikt voor andere domeinen)
  • en deze analoog aan 10 opschrijven (zij het dat we de componenten anders betitelen).
  • Het aanschrijven van auteurs (14) gebeurt als uiterste mogelijkheid. Eerst doen we de opties die door Geert als alternatief aangedragen worden: het sneeuwballen met als doel de zoekstrategie aan te passen. (dit weet ik omdat ik zelf de cursus “zoeken voor Cochrane Systematic Reviews” geef).

Als grote verschillen blijven dan over: (7) ons motto: geaggregeerde evidence eerst en (12) zoeken met MeSH versus zoeken in titel en abstract en het feit dat alle componenten met AND verbonden worden, wat ik maar mondjesmaat doe. Want: hoe meer termen/componenten je met “AND” combineert hoe groter de kans dat je iets mist. Soms moet het, maar je gaat niet a priori zo te werk.

Ik vond het een beetje flauw dat Geert aanhaalde dat er door één Cochrane reviewer een fout is gemaakt, waardoor er duizenden doden zouden zijn gevallen. Laat hij dan ook zeggen dat door het initiatief van de Cochrane er levens van honderd duizenden zijn gered, omdat eindelijk goed in kaart is gebracht welke therapieën nu wel en welke nu niet effectief zijn. Bij alle studies geldt dat je afhankelijk bent van hoe goed te studie is gedaan, van een juiste statistiek etcetera. Voordeel van geaggregeerde evidence is nu net dat een arts niet alle oorspronkelijke studies hoeft door te lezen om erachter te komen wat werkt (NNR!!!). Stel dat elke arts voor elke vraag ALLE individuele studies moet zoeken, beoordelen en moet samenvatten….. Dat zou, zoals de Cochrane het vaak noemt ‘duplication of effort’ zijn. Maar wil je precies weten hoe het zit, of wil je heel volledig zijn dan zul je inderdaad zelf de oorspronkelijke studies moeten zoeken en beoordelen.
Wel grappig trouwens dat 22 van de 70 artikelen waarvan Geert medeauteur is tot de geaggregeerde evidence (inclusief Cochrane Reviews) gerekend kunnen worden….. Zou hij de lezers ook afraden deze artikelen te selecteren? 😉

Voor wat betreft het zoeken via de MeSH. Ik denk dat weinig ‘zoekers’ louter en alleen op MeSH zoeken. Wij gebruiken ook tekstwoorden. In hoeverre er gebruik van gemaakt wordt hangt erg van het doel en de tijd af. Je moet steeds afwegen wat de voor- en de nadelen zijn. Door geen MeSH te gebruiken, maak je ook geen gebruik van de synoniemen functie en de mogelijkheid tot exploderen (nauwere termen meenemen). Probeer maar eens in een zoekactie alle synoniemen voor kanker te vinden: cancer, cancers , tumor, tumour(s), neoplasm(s), malignancy (-ies), maar daarnaast ook alle verschilende kankers: adenocarcinoma, lymphoma, Hodgkin’s disease, etc. Met de MeSH “Neoplasms” vind je in een keer alle spellingswijzen, synoniemen en alle soorten kanker te vinden.

Maar in ieder geval heeft Geert ons geconfronteerd met een heel andere zienswijze en ons een spiegel voorgehouden. Het is soms goed om even wakkergeschud te worden en na te denken over je eigen (soms te ?) routinematige aanpak. Geert ging niet de uitdaging uit de weg om de 2 zoekmethodes met elkaar te willen vergelijken. Dus wie weet wat hier nog uit voortvloeit. Zouden we tot een consensus kunnen komen?

De volgende praatjes waren weliswaar minder provocerend, maar toch zeker de moeite waard.

De web 2.0-goeroe Wouter Gerritsma (WoWter) praatte ons bij over web 2.0, zorg 2.0 en (medische) bibliotheek 2.0. Zeer toepasselijk met zeer moderne middelen: een powerpointpresentatie via slideshare te bewonderen en met een WIKI, van waaruit hij steeds enkele links aanklikte. Helaas was de internetverbinding af en toe niet zo 2.0, zodat bijvoorbeeld deze beeldende YOU TUBE-uitleg Web 2.0 … The machine is us/ing us niet afgespeeld kon worden. Maar handig van zo’n wiki is natuurlijk dat je het alsnog kunt opzoeken en afspelen. In de presentatie kwamen wat practische voorbeelden aan de orde (bibliotheek, zorg, artsen) en werd ingegaan op de verschillende tools van web 2.0: RSS, blogs, gepersonaliseerde pagina’s, tagging en wiki’s. Ik was wel even apetrots dat mijn blog alsmede dat van de bibliotheker even als voorbeeld getoond werden van beginnende (medische bieb) SPOETNIKbloggers. De spoetnikcursus en 23 dingen werden sowieso gepromoot om te volgen als beginner. Voor wie meer wil weten, kijk nog eens naar de wiki: het biedt een mooi overzicht.

Als laatsten hielden Tanja van Bon en Sjors Clemens een duo-presentatie over e-learning. Als originele start begonnen ze met vragen te stellen in plaats van ermee te eindigen. Daarna gaven ze een leuke introductie over e-learning en lieten ze zien hoe ze dit in hun ziekenhuis implementeerden.

Tussen en na de lezingen was er ruim tijd om met elkaar van gedachten te wisselen, aan het slot zelfs onder genot van een borrel voor wie niet de BOB was. Zeker een heel geslaagde dag. Hier ga ik vaker naar toe!

**************************************************************************************************

met de W: ik zie dat de bibliotheker inmiddels ook een stukje heeft geschreven over de lezing van Geert van der Heiden. Misschien ook leuk om dit te lezen.

N.B. VOOR WIE DE HELE PRESENTATIE VAN GEERT WIL ZIEN, DEZE IS MET ZIJN TOESTEMMING GEZET OP

http://www.slideshare.net/llkool/bmi-18-april-2008-geert-van-der-heijden/





The best moment teaching EBM-searching skills?

6 04 2008

When you are a (future) doctor you will obviously need to look for publications at one stage or another. PubMed is the place to look for relevant medical papers. Usually medical students begin to feel the urge to learn the ins and outs of PubMed (and searching in general) once they do their scientific training (4th year) or their internship, especially when they have to perform a CAT, critically appraised topic. Then it turns out their superficial knowledge of PubMed is one of the main hurdles. They find too many hits or too few and/or miss the relevant ones.

To help them I started a monthly class of 2 hours in which I learn interns (at the dept. Gynaecology) the basics of EBM, at least the first two steps: constructing a well answerable question using the PICO method (including defining the domain/levels of evidence) and finding the evidence in PubMed as well as in aggregate resources. (these two steps are called EBS or evidence based searching). Interns are asked to prepare 4 questions, all based on previous CATs. The first question is answered during an interactive power point presentation (first hour), the other 3 are practised ‘hands on’. If needed I give them personal aftercare.

It is a highly appreciated course, and it helped to improve the quality of the CATs. So that’s very encouraging.

I often get the same feedback from the user surveys:

  • well structured and informative
  • why didn’t we get this earlier?
  • too much information at once (especially at the end of the day)

To meet their wish my colleagues started a short introduction in PubMed prior to this ‘advanced’ class. As a result, the students are better acquainted with PubMed and we can delve more in depth into the subject. Last session they even prepared all questions. I wasn’t aware and asked one of the students (quite disappointed) why he still put the words in one string in the search bar instead of looking up each word separately and checking whether the words mapped correctly to the appropriate MeSH. He replied: “But I already did this at home. I checked out all the words.” showing his notes. And I must admit his search was quite good. So I was very satisfied with this group of students.

But the feedback remains the same. well structured and informative – why didn’t we get this earlier? – too much information at once. (especially at the end of the day)

Thus one would be inclined to think there is a need to teach students earlier on.

Now coincidently, a new curriculum has started in our academic hospital, in which EBM is incorporated into the clinical modules. The 1st year students learn about information resources and study designs. In the 2nd year they learn the basics of PubMed, EBM, PICO’s, Evidence Based Searching and Systematic Reviews.

Our library is involved in the educational process with respect to information resources, PICO’s and searching. Most of the teaching is in the form of e-learning (Dutch: COO, computer ondersteunend onderwijs) using the QMP (question mark perception) system, which is basically designed to test knowledge.

We have made a tutorial for PubMed (a-basic-learn-the-buttons-and-MeSH-course) and I prepared an e-learning module on PICO’s, study-designs and aggregate evidence, for the Cardiology block. This took me 6 weeks! It was reasonably well received by the students… That is, who bothered to give feedback.

During the course “Pulmonology” (february/march) we gave 30 “Finding the Evidence Search Workshops” to 6-12 students.
I had quite high expectations, since in theory these students should have a good theoretical basis (considering the earlier e-learning tutorials).

However their knowledge was quite disappointing, and even more so were their motivation and attitude. They were just a bunch of kids, most of them not very interested in PubMed, searching, EBM or whatsoever. They were often giggling and chatting, which I find rather distracting, or were passive, silent and gazing, which is even more distracting. And when I took a glimpse at their screens I often saw g-mail and unfamiliar colourful sites instead of PubMed.

I wondered at what point these students would pupate and transform into the butterflies called interns? And at this stage I couldn’t imagine them sitting on my bedside as a doctor I would trust unconditionally.

Was it really this bad? No, I’m a bit exaggerating. When I sound them out it appeared that they find the scientific methodology courses to fragmented, too basic and not the core of their study: firstly they want to pass their exams and secondly they want to become a doctor(!), not a scientist nor a librarian. I suppose E-learning and tutorials are not the ideal tools, not even for the computer generation. E-learning has to be dosed and is not as inspiring as a good tutor (at least that is what I think).

Anyway after one hour yawning, sighing and bewildered looks and after a much needed coffee break with cookies (a brilliant move of two of my collegues) I got the impression the penny finally dropped. Some students mumbled: “Mmm, I think I come to understand it” others smiled and uttered “Yes!” and the remaining questions were answered rather swiftly by most students. It even turned out that some of the glossy sites I had seen were on-line medical dictionaries, they used to look up the correct terms. Yes, this young generation is capable of multitasking.

If these courses were evaluated the same way as the above mentioned CAT-course, I guess the outcome would be as follows:

  • not particularly interesting
  • why do we have to learn this now? can’t it wait?
  • too much information….

We still need to find the ideal timing for these courses and also a better dosing. The best timing is when they need it the most, I suppose. The students who absorbed the information best were those who needed the information right now or found out that needed it before (i.e. they now realized that their previous searches were far from ideal). The form is also something to workat. Especially the e-learning modules should be better integrated into the clinical blocks. It is not sufficient to tune in with the subject. For students to appreciate and retain information, searching skills need to be taught in tandem with assignments. Students need to see the relevance of what they learning.