Between the Lines. Finding the Truth in Medical Literature [Book Review]

19 07 2013

In the 1970s a study was conducted among 60 physicians and physicians-in-training. They had to solve a simple problem:

“If a test to detect a disease whose prevalence is 1/1000 has a false positive rate of 5 %, what is the chance that a person found to have a positive result actually has the disease, assuming that you know nothing about the person’s symptoms or signs?” 

Half of the “medical experts” thought the answer was 95%.
Only a small proportion, 18%, of the doctors arrived at the right answer of 2%.

If you are a medical expert who comes the same faulty conclusion -or need a refresher how to arrive at the right answer- you might benefit from the book written by Marya Zilberberg: “Between the Lines. Finding the Truth in Medical Literature”.

The same is true for a patient whose doctor thinks he/she is among the 95% to benefit form such a test…
Or for journalists who translate medical news to the public…
Or for peer reviewers or editors who have to assess biomedical papers…

In other words, this book is useful for everyone who wants to be able to read “between the lines”. For everyone who needs to examine medical literature critically from time to time and doesn’t want to rely solely on the interpretation of others.

I hope that I didn’t scare you off with the abovementioned example. Between the Lines surely is NOT a complicated epidemiology textbook, nor a dull studybook where you have to struggle through a lot of definitions, difficult tables and statistic formulas and where each chapter is followed by a set of review questions that test what you learned.

This example is presented half way the book, at the end of Part I. By then you have enough tools to solve the question yourself. But even if you don’t feel like doing the exact calculation at that moment, you have a solid basis to understand the bottomline: the (enormous) 93% gap (95% vs 2% of the people with a positive test are considered truly positive) serves as the pool for overdiagnosis and overtreatment.

In the previous chapters of Part I (“Context”), you have learned about the scientific methods in clinical research, uncertainty as the only certain feature of science, the importance of denominators, outcomes that matter and outcomes that don’t, Bayesian probability, evidence hierarchies, heterogeneous treatment effects (does the evidence apply to this particular patient?) and all kinds of biases.

Most reviewers prefer part I of the book. Personally I find part II (“Evaluation”) as interesting.

Part II deals with the study question, and study design, pros and cons of observational and interventional studies, validity, hypothesis testing and statistics.

Perhaps part II  is somewhat less narrative. Furthermore, it deals with tougher topics like statistics. But I find it very valuable for being able to critically appraise a study. I have never seen a better description of “ODDs”: somehow ODDs it is better to grasp if you substitute “treatment A” and “treatment B” for “horse A” and “horse B”, and substitute “death” for “loss of a race”.
I knew the basic differences between cohort studies, case control studies and so on, but I kind of never realized before that ODDs Ratio is the only measure of association available in a case-control study and that case control studies cannot estimate incidence or prevalence (as shown in a nice overview in table 4).

Unlike many other books about “the art of reading of medical articles”, “study designs” or “Evidence Based Medicine”, Marya’s book is easy to read. It is written at a conversational tone and statements are illustrated by means of current, appealing examples, like the overestimation of risk of death from the H1N1 virus, breast cancer screening and hormone replacement therapy.

Although I had printed this book in a wrong order (page 136 next to 13 etc), I was able to read (and understand) 1/3 of the book (the more difficult part II) during a 2 hour car trip….

Because this book is comprehensive, yet accessible, I recommend it highly to everyone, including fellow librarians.

Marya even mentions medical librarians as a separate target audience:

Medical librarians may find this book particularly helpful: Being at the forefront of evidence dissemination, they can lead the charge of separating credible science from rubbish.

(thanks Marya!)

In addition, this book may be indirectly useful to librarians as it may help to choose appropriate methodological filters and search terms for certain EBM-questions. In case of etiology questions words like “cohort”, “case-control”, “odds”, “risk” and “regression” might help to find the “right” studies.

By the way Marya Ziberberg @murzee at Twitter and she writes at her blog Healthcare etc.

p.s. 1 I want to apologize to Marya for writing this review more than a year after the book was published. For personal reasons I found little time to read and blog. Luckily the book lost none of its topicality.

p.s. 2 patients who are not very familiar with critical reading of medical papers might benefit from reading “your medical mind” first [1]. 

bwtn the lines

Amazon Product Details





The #TwitJC Twitter Journal Club, a New Initiative on Twitter. Some Initial Thoughts.

10 06 2011

There is a new initiative on Twitter: The Twitter Journal Club. It is initiated by Fi Douglas (@fidouglas) a medical student at Cambridge,  and Natalie Silvey (@silv24)  a junior doctor in the West Midlands.

Fi and Natalie have set up a blog for this event: http://twitjc.wordpress.com/

A Twitter Journal Club operates in the same way as any other journal club, except that the forum is Twitter.

The organizers choose a paper, which they announce at their website (you can make suggestions here or via a tweet). Ideally, people should read the entire paper before the Twitter session. A short summary with key points (i.e. see here) is posted on the website.

The first topic was:  Early Goal-Directed Therapy in the Treatment of Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock [PDF]

It started last Sunday 8 pm (Dutch time) and took almost 2 hours to complete.

@twitjournalclub (the twitter account of the organizers) started with a short introduction. People introduced themselves as they entered the discussion. Each tweet in the discussion was tagged with #TwitJC (a so called hashtag), otherwise it won’t get picked up by people following the hashtag. (Tweetchat automatically provides the hashtag you type in).

Although it was the first session, many people (perhaps almost 100?!) joined the Journal Club, both actively and more passively. That is a terrific achievement. Afterwards it got a very positive Twitter “press”. If you know to engage people like @nothern_doctor, @doctorblogs, @amcunningham and @drgrumble and people like @bengoldacre, @cebmblog and @david_colquhoun find it a terrific concept, then you know that it is a great idea that meets a need. As such, enough reason to continue.

There were also not purely positive voices. @DrVes sees it as a great effort, but added that “we need to go beyond this 1950s model rather than adapt it to social media.” Apparently this tweet was not well received, but I think he made a very sensible statement.

We can (and should) asks ourselves if Twitter is the right medium for such an event.

@DrVes has experience with Twitter Journal Clubs. He participated in the first medical journal club on Twitter at the Allergy and Immunology program of Creighton University back in 2008 and presented a poster at an allergy meeting in 2009.

BUT, as far as I can tell, that Twitter Journal Club was both much more small-scale (7 fellows?) and different in design. It seems that Tweets summarized what was being said at a real journal club teaching session. Ves Dimov:

“The updates were followed in real time by the Allergy and Immunology fellows at the Louisiana State University (Shreveport) and some interested residents at Cleveland Clinic, along with the 309 subscribers of my Twitter account named AllergyNotes“.

So that is the same as tweeting during a conference or a lecture to inform others about the most interesting facts/statements. It is one-way-tweeting (overall there were just 24 updates with links).

I think the present  Twitter Journal Club was more like a medical Twitter chat (also the words of Ves).

Is chatting on Twitter effective?

Well that depends on what one wants to achieve.

Apparently for all people participating, it was fun to do and educative.

I joined too late to tell, thus I awaited the transcript. But boy, who wants to read 31 pages of “chaotic tweets”? Because that is what a Twitter chat is if many people join.  All tweets are ordered chronologically. Good for the archive, but if the intention is to make the transcribed chat available to people who couldn’t attend, it needs deleting, cutting, pasting and sorting. But that is a lot of work if done manually.

I tried it for part of the transcript. Compare the original transcript here with this Google Doc.

The “remix of tweets” also illustrates that people have their own “mini-chats”, and “off-topic” (but often very relevant) questions.

In addition, the audience is very mixed. Some people seem to have little experience with critical appraisal or concepts like “intention to treat” (ITT) and would perhaps benefit from supplementary information beforehand (i.e. documents at the TwitJC website). Others are experienced doctors with a lot of clinical expertise, who always put theoretical things in perspective. Very valuable, but often they are far ahead in the discussion.

The name of the event is Twitter  Journal Club. Journal Club is a somewhat ambiguous term. According to Wikipedia “A journal club is a group of individuals who meet regularly to critically evaluate recent articles in scientific literature”. It can deal with any piece which looks interesting to share, including hypotheses and preclinical papers about mechanisms of actions.

Thus, to me Journal club is not per definition EBM (Evidence Based Medicine).

Other initiatives are a critical appraisal of a study and a CAT,  a critical appraisal of a topic (sometimes wrongly called PICO, PICO is only part of it).

The structure of the present journal club was more that of a critical appraisal. It followed the normal checklist for an RCT: What is being studied? Is the paper valid (appropriately allocated, blinded etc ), what are the results (NNT etc) and are the results valid outside of the context of the paper?

Imo, official critical appraisal of the paper costs a lot of time and is not the most interesting. Looking at my edited transcript you see that half of the people are answering the question and they all say the same: “Clearly focused question” is answer to first question (but even in the edited transcript this takes 3 pages), “clear interventions (helpful flowcharts) is the answer to the second question.

Half of the people have their own questions. Very legitimate and good questions, but not in line with the questions of @twitjournalclub. Talking about the NNT and about whether the results are really revolutionary, is VERY relevant, but should be left till the end.

A twitter chat with appr. 100 people needs a tight structure.

However, I wonder whether this  approach of critical appraisal is the most interesting. Even more so, because this part didn’t evoke much discussion.

Plus it has already been done!!

I searched the TRIP database and with the title of the paper, to find critical appraisals or synopses of the paper. I found 3 synopses, 2 of which follow more or less the structure of this journal club here, here (and this older one). They answer all the questions about validity.

Wouldn’t it have better with this older key paper (2001) to just use the existing critical appraisals as background information and discuss the implications? Or discuss new supporting or contradictory findings?

The very limited search in TRIP (title of paper only) showed some new interesting papers on the topic (external validation, cost effectiveness, implementation, antibiotics) and I am sure there are many more.

A CAT may also be more interesting than a synopsis, because “other pieces of evidence” are also taken into consideration and one discusses a topic not one single paper. But perhaps this is too difficult to do, because one has to do a thorough search as well and has too much to discuss. Alternatively one could choose a recent systematic review, which summarizes the existing RCT’s.

Anyway, I think the journal club could improve by not following the entire checklist (boring! done!), but use this as a background. Furthermore I think there should be 3-5 questions that are very relevant to discuss. Like in the #HSCMEU discussions, people could pose those questions beforehand. In this way it is easier to adhere to the structure.

As to the medium Twitter for this journal club. I am not fond of  long Twitter chats, because it tends to be chaotic, there is a lot of reiteration, people tend to tweet not to “listen” and there is a constriction of 140 characters. Personally I would prefer a webinar, where people discuss the topic and you can pose questions via Twitter or otherwise.
Other alternatives wouldn’t work for me either. A Facebook journal club (described by of Neil Mehta) looks more static (commenting to a short summary of a paper), and Skyping is difficult with more than 10 people and not easy to transcribe.

But as said there is a lot of enthusiasm for this Twitter Journal Club. Even outside the medical world. This “convincing effort” inspired others to start a Astronomy Twitter Journal Club.

Perhaps a little modification of goals and structure could make it even more interesting. I will try to attend the next event, which is about Geoffrey Rose’s ‘Prevention Paradox’ paper, officially titled ”Strategy of prevention: lessons from cardiovascular disease”, available here.

Notes added:

[1] A summary of the first Twitter journal club is just posted. This is really valuable and takes away the disadvantages of reading an entire transcript (but one misses a lot of interesting aspects too)!

[2] This is the immediate response of one of the organizers at Twitter. I’m very pleased to notice that they will put more emphasis on implications of the Journal. That would take away much of my critic.

(Read tweets from bottom to top).

References

  1. Welcome (twitjc.wordpress.com)
  2. An important topic for the first Twitter Journal Club (twitjc.wordpress.com)
  3. Rivers E, Nguyen B, Havstad S, Ressler J, Muzzin A, Knoblich B, Peterson E, Tomlanovich M; Early Goal-Directed Therapy Collaborative Group. Early goal-directed therapy in the treatment of severe sepsis and septic shock. N Engl J Med. 2001 Nov 8;345(19):1368-77. PubMed PMID: 11794169. (PDF).
  4. The First Journal Club on Twitter – Then and Now (casesblog.blogspot.com)
  5. Allergy and Immunologyclub on Twitter (allergynotes.blogspot.com)
  6. The Utility of a Real-time Microblogging Service for Journal Club in Allergy and Immunology. Dimov, V.; Randhawa, S.; Auron, M.; Casale, T. American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (ACAAI) 2009 Annual Meeting. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol., Vol 103:5, Suppl. 3, A126, Nov 2009.
  7. https://docs.google.com/document/pub?id=1qzk1WzjNO5fbWd0PAax6cIDdUGGg1sDn86FPT1li-sQ (short remix of the transcript)
  8. Model for a Journal Club using Google Reader and Facebook OR if the prophet does not go to the Mountain…. bring the journal club to FB! (blogedutech.blogspot.com)
  9. Astronomy Twitter Journal Club/ (sarahaskew.net)
  10. A summary of week one: Rivers et al (twitjc.wordpress.com)




Training: ‘Getting The Best Out Of Search Filters’

24 01 2009

Information Specialists, other information professionals and researchers seeking more insight into the usefulness of search filters might be interested in the following training event:

YHEC Training Event: ‘Getting The Best Out Of Search Filters’

University of York, 26 February 09 or UK Cochrane Centre, Oxford, 04 March 09

This training event will explore how to identify, critically appraise and test out search filters, focusing on health and social care.

The training day presenters will be Julie Glanville (Project Director, Information Services, York Health Economics Consortium, University of York) and Carol Lefebvre (Senior Information Specialist at the UK Cochrane Centre).

By the end of the study day, participants will have:

  • An awareness of how to identify published search filters;
  • An understanding of the features of search filter design to be able to critically appraise search filters;
  • An awareness of the key issues to be considered in assessing the suitability of search filtesr for specific questions;
  • An understanding of the challenges of translating search filters between interfaces and databases.

For more information see here To book a place please click here.

An overview of other training events can be found here

Unfortunately, both of these courses are now fully booked. YHEC will be running a further course later in the year (perhaps in November), and they may be running a course in the Netherlands in due course as well. You can contact ab588@york.ac.uk to be put on a mailing list to be kept informed of these courses.





Presentatie Geert van der Heijden op Slideshare

23 04 2008

De presentatie van Geert van der Heijden van vrijdag 18 april j.l. (BMI-ALV) is nu op Slideshare geplaatst (Lieuwe Kool slaat enkele web 2.0 stappen over ;).
Ik had er al in een eerder post melding van gemaakt, maar daar stond het zo temidden van de grote hoeveelheid tekst, dat het waarschijnlijk wat ondergesneeuwd raakte.
Verder had ik nog geen ervaring met embedden van een slide-serie, dus dat leek me meteen een aardig experimentje. Jammer dat Geert’s presentatie niet gepodcast is, want dan had ik meteen de SPOETNIK opdracht van deze week voltooid. Ik loop wat dat betreft nogal achter.

Fijn dat Geert deze presentatie ter beschikking heeft gesteld. Zo kan men even rustig Geerts’ verhaal in zijn eigen woorden (na) lezen in plaats van de afgeleiden hiervan op deze of gene blog.
Zo kan ik ook nog even lezen wat ik het eerste kwartier heb gemist.

Presentatie Geert staat online op slideshare:





BMI bijeenkomst april 2008

21 04 2008

Afgelopen vrijdag 18 April was de Landelijke Dag BMI, CCZ, PBZ en WEB&Z. De BMI is afdeling Biomedische Informatie van de Nederlandse Vereniging voor Beroepsbeoefenaren (NVB). De andere afkortingen staan voor werkgroepen/commissies binnen de NVB: CCZ = Centrale Catalogus Ziekenhuisbibliotheken, BPZ = Bibliothecarissen van Psychiatrische Zorginstellingenen en WEB&Z = voorheen Biomedische werkgroep VOGIN.

Het programma bestond uit 3 ALV’s, van de CCZ, de BPZ en de BMI, afgewisseld met 3 lezingen. Een beetje lastig 3 ALV’s en 1 zaal. Dat betekende in mijn geval dat ik wel de BMI-ALV heb bijgewoond, maar tijdens de andere ALV’s (langdurig) in de koffieruimte annex gang moest wachten. Weliswaar heb ik die nuttig en plezierig doorgebracht, maar het zou wat gestroomlijnder kunnen. Ook vond ik het bijzonder jammer dat er nauwelijks een plenaire discussie was na de lezingen en dat men geacht werd de discussie letterlijk in de wandelgang voort te zetten. En stof tot discussie was er…..

Met name de eerste lezing deed de nodige stof opwaaien. Helaas heb ik deze voor de helft gemist, omdat ik in het station Hilversum dat van Amersfoort meende te herkennen 😉 . Gelukkig heeft Ronald van Dieën op zijn blog ook de BMI-dag opgetekend, zodat ik de eerste punten van hem kan overnemen.

De eerste spreker was Geert van der Heijden, Universitair hoofddocent Klinische Epidemiologie bij het Julius Centrum voor Gezondheidswetenschappen van het UMC Utrecht. Geert is coördinator van het START-blok voor zesdejaars (Supervised Training in professional Attitude, Research and Teaching) en van de Academische Vaardigheden voor het GNK Masteronderwijs. Ik kende Geert oppervlakkig, omdat wij (afzonderlijk) geinterviewd waren voor het co-assistenten blad “Arts in Spe” over de integratie van het EBM-zoekonderwijs in het curriculum. Nu ik hem hier in levende lijve heb gehoord, lees ik zijn interview met heel andere ogen. Ik zag toen meer de overeenkomsten, nu de verschillen.

Zijn presentatie had als titel: “hoe zoekt de clinicus?”. Wie verwachtte dat Geert zou vertellen hoe de gemiddelde clinicus daadwerkelijk zoekt komt komt bedrogen uit. Geert vertelde vooral de methode van zoeken die hij artsen aanleert/voorhoudt. Deze methode is bepaald niet ingeburgerd en lijkt diametraal te staan tegenover de werkwijze van medisch informatiespecialisten, per slot zijn gehoor van dat moment. Alleen al het feit dat hij beweert dat je VOORAL GEEN MeSH moet gebruiken druist in tegen wat wij medisch informatiespecialisten leren en uitdragen. Het is de vraag of de zaal zo stil was, omdat zij overvallen werd door al het schokkends wat er gezegd werd of omdat men niet wist waar te beginnen met een weerwoord. Ik zag letterlijk een aantal monden openhangen van verbazing.

Zoals Ronald al stelde was dit een forse knuppel in het hoenderhok van de ‘medisch informatiespecialisten’. Ik deel echter niet zijn mening dat Geert het prima kon onderbouwen met argumenten. Hij is weliswaar een begenadigd spreker en bracht het allemaal met verve, maar ik had toch sterk de indruk dat zijn aanpak vooral practice- of eminence- en niet evidence-based was.

Hieronder enkele van zijn stellingen, 1ste 5 overgenomen van Ronald:

  1. “Een onderzoeker probeert publicatie air miles te verdienen met impact factors”
  2. “in Utrecht krijgen de studenten zo’n 500 uur Clinical Epidemiology en Evidence Based Practice, daar waar ze in Oxford (roots van EBM) slechts 10 uur krijgen”
  3. “contemporary EBM tactics (Sicily statement). (zie bijvoorbeeld hier:….)
  4. “fill knowledge gaps met problem solving skills”
  5. EBM = eminence biased medicine. Er zit veel goeds tussen, maar pas op….
  6. Belangrijkste doelstelling van literatuuronderzoek: reduceer Numbers Needed to Read.
  7. Vertrouw nooit 2e hands informatie (dit noemen wij voorgefilterde of geaggregeerde evidence) zoals TRIP, UpToDate, Cochrane Systematic Reviews, BMJ Clinical Evidence. Men zegt dat de Cochrane Systematic Reviews zo goed zijn, maar éen verschuiving van een komma heeft duizenden levens gekost. Lees en beoordeel dus de primaire bronnen!
  8. De Cochrane Collaboration houdt zich alleen maar bezig met systematische reviews van interventies, het doet niets aan de veel belangrijker domeinen “diagnose” en “prognose”.
  9. PICO (patient, intervention, comparison, outcome) werkt alleen voor therapie, niet voor andere vraagstukken.
  10. In plaats daarvan de vraag in 3 componenten splitsen: het domein (de categorie patiënten), de determinant (de diagnostische test, prognostische variabele of behandeling) en de uitkomst (ziekte, mortaliteit en …..)
  11. Zoeken doe je als volgt: bedenk voor elk van de 3 componenten zoveel mogelijk synoniemen op papier, verbind deze met “OR”, verbind de componenten met “AND”.
  12. De synoniemen alleen in titel en abstract zoeken (code [tiab]) EN NOOIT met MeSH (MEDLINE Subject Headings). MeSH zijn NOOIT bruikbaar volgens Geert. Ze zijn vaak te breed, ze zijn soms verouderd en je vindt er geen recente artikelen mee, omdat de indexering soms 3-12 maanden zou kosten.
  13. NOOIT Clinical Queries gebruiken. De methodologische filters die in PubMed zijn opgenomen, de zogenaamde Clinical Queries zijn enkel gebaseerd op MeSH en daarom niet bruikbaar. Verder zijn ze ontwikkeld voor heel specifieke onderwerpsgebieden, zoals cardiologie, en daarom niet algemeen toepasbaar.
  14. Volgens de Cochrane zou je als je een studie ‘mist’ de auteurs moeten aanschrijven. Dat lukt van geen kant. Beter is het te sneeuwballen via Web of Science en related articles en op basis daarvan JE ZOEKACTIE AAN TE PASSEN.

Wanneer men volgens de methode van der Heijden werkt zou men in een half uur klaar zijn met zoeken en in 2 uur de artikelen geselecteerd en beoordeeld hebben. Nou dat doe ik hem niet na.

De hierboven in rood weergegeven uitspraken zijn niet (geheel) juist. 8. Therapie is naar mijn bescheiden mening nog steeds een belangrijk domein; daarnaast is gaat de Cochrane Collaboration ook SR’s over diagnostische accuratesse studies schrijven. 13. in clinical queries worden (juist) niet alleen MeSH gebruikt.

In de groen weergegeven uitspraken kan ik me wel (ten dele) vinden, maar ze zijn niet essentieel verschillend van wat ik (men?) zelf nastreef(t)/doe(t), en dat wordt wel impliciet gesuggereerd.
Vele informatiespecialisten zullen ook:

  • 6 nastreven (door 7 te doen weliswaar),
  • 9 benadrukken (de PICO is inderdaad voor interventies ontwikkeld en minder geschikt voor andere domeinen)
  • en deze analoog aan 10 opschrijven (zij het dat we de componenten anders betitelen).
  • Het aanschrijven van auteurs (14) gebeurt als uiterste mogelijkheid. Eerst doen we de opties die door Geert als alternatief aangedragen worden: het sneeuwballen met als doel de zoekstrategie aan te passen. (dit weet ik omdat ik zelf de cursus “zoeken voor Cochrane Systematic Reviews” geef).

Als grote verschillen blijven dan over: (7) ons motto: geaggregeerde evidence eerst en (12) zoeken met MeSH versus zoeken in titel en abstract en het feit dat alle componenten met AND verbonden worden, wat ik maar mondjesmaat doe. Want: hoe meer termen/componenten je met “AND” combineert hoe groter de kans dat je iets mist. Soms moet het, maar je gaat niet a priori zo te werk.

Ik vond het een beetje flauw dat Geert aanhaalde dat er door één Cochrane reviewer een fout is gemaakt, waardoor er duizenden doden zouden zijn gevallen. Laat hij dan ook zeggen dat door het initiatief van de Cochrane er levens van honderd duizenden zijn gered, omdat eindelijk goed in kaart is gebracht welke therapieën nu wel en welke nu niet effectief zijn. Bij alle studies geldt dat je afhankelijk bent van hoe goed te studie is gedaan, van een juiste statistiek etcetera. Voordeel van geaggregeerde evidence is nu net dat een arts niet alle oorspronkelijke studies hoeft door te lezen om erachter te komen wat werkt (NNR!!!). Stel dat elke arts voor elke vraag ALLE individuele studies moet zoeken, beoordelen en moet samenvatten….. Dat zou, zoals de Cochrane het vaak noemt ‘duplication of effort’ zijn. Maar wil je precies weten hoe het zit, of wil je heel volledig zijn dan zul je inderdaad zelf de oorspronkelijke studies moeten zoeken en beoordelen.
Wel grappig trouwens dat 22 van de 70 artikelen waarvan Geert medeauteur is tot de geaggregeerde evidence (inclusief Cochrane Reviews) gerekend kunnen worden….. Zou hij de lezers ook afraden deze artikelen te selecteren? 😉

Voor wat betreft het zoeken via de MeSH. Ik denk dat weinig ‘zoekers’ louter en alleen op MeSH zoeken. Wij gebruiken ook tekstwoorden. In hoeverre er gebruik van gemaakt wordt hangt erg van het doel en de tijd af. Je moet steeds afwegen wat de voor- en de nadelen zijn. Door geen MeSH te gebruiken, maak je ook geen gebruik van de synoniemen functie en de mogelijkheid tot exploderen (nauwere termen meenemen). Probeer maar eens in een zoekactie alle synoniemen voor kanker te vinden: cancer, cancers , tumor, tumour(s), neoplasm(s), malignancy (-ies), maar daarnaast ook alle verschilende kankers: adenocarcinoma, lymphoma, Hodgkin’s disease, etc. Met de MeSH “Neoplasms” vind je in een keer alle spellingswijzen, synoniemen en alle soorten kanker te vinden.

Maar in ieder geval heeft Geert ons geconfronteerd met een heel andere zienswijze en ons een spiegel voorgehouden. Het is soms goed om even wakkergeschud te worden en na te denken over je eigen (soms te ?) routinematige aanpak. Geert ging niet de uitdaging uit de weg om de 2 zoekmethodes met elkaar te willen vergelijken. Dus wie weet wat hier nog uit voortvloeit. Zouden we tot een consensus kunnen komen?

De volgende praatjes waren weliswaar minder provocerend, maar toch zeker de moeite waard.

De web 2.0-goeroe Wouter Gerritsma (WoWter) praatte ons bij over web 2.0, zorg 2.0 en (medische) bibliotheek 2.0. Zeer toepasselijk met zeer moderne middelen: een powerpointpresentatie via slideshare te bewonderen en met een WIKI, van waaruit hij steeds enkele links aanklikte. Helaas was de internetverbinding af en toe niet zo 2.0, zodat bijvoorbeeld deze beeldende YOU TUBE-uitleg Web 2.0 … The machine is us/ing us niet afgespeeld kon worden. Maar handig van zo’n wiki is natuurlijk dat je het alsnog kunt opzoeken en afspelen. In de presentatie kwamen wat practische voorbeelden aan de orde (bibliotheek, zorg, artsen) en werd ingegaan op de verschillende tools van web 2.0: RSS, blogs, gepersonaliseerde pagina’s, tagging en wiki’s. Ik was wel even apetrots dat mijn blog alsmede dat van de bibliotheker even als voorbeeld getoond werden van beginnende (medische bieb) SPOETNIKbloggers. De spoetnikcursus en 23 dingen werden sowieso gepromoot om te volgen als beginner. Voor wie meer wil weten, kijk nog eens naar de wiki: het biedt een mooi overzicht.

Als laatsten hielden Tanja van Bon en Sjors Clemens een duo-presentatie over e-learning. Als originele start begonnen ze met vragen te stellen in plaats van ermee te eindigen. Daarna gaven ze een leuke introductie over e-learning en lieten ze zien hoe ze dit in hun ziekenhuis implementeerden.

Tussen en na de lezingen was er ruim tijd om met elkaar van gedachten te wisselen, aan het slot zelfs onder genot van een borrel voor wie niet de BOB was. Zeker een heel geslaagde dag. Hier ga ik vaker naar toe!

**************************************************************************************************

met de W: ik zie dat de bibliotheker inmiddels ook een stukje heeft geschreven over de lezing van Geert van der Heiden. Misschien ook leuk om dit te lezen.

N.B. VOOR WIE DE HELE PRESENTATIE VAN GEERT WIL ZIEN, DEZE IS MET ZIJN TOESTEMMING GEZET OP

http://www.slideshare.net/llkool/bmi-18-april-2008-geert-van-der-heijden/