“Ask a Librarian” a new series in the JAAPA.

22 03 2009

The Journal of the American Academy of Physician Assistants (JAAPA) features a new online column : “Ask a Librarian”. Or as JAAPA states it: the inaugural installment of JAAPA’s first online only department. This column is a co-authored by Jim Anderson, Physician Assistant, and Susan Klawansky, Librarian. It aims to promote collaboration of PA’s and other clinicians with medical librarians, address questions from physician assistants and point to resources, including nnlm.gov.

This is a very good initiative, an example that deserves to be followed by other publishers.

The first questions answered were:

  1. Can you explain what a MeSH Heading is? I always hear that term, but I don’t understand what it means. Is it something I need to know to do a good search?
  2. I need to find an article about an exotic genetic condition of one of my patients. I work in a hospital in a rural and remote area in Montana, and while I have access to the Internet, I don’t have access to a library or a librarian. How can I get help online finding an article, and when I find a reference, how can I get the full-text?

Relevant questions, but the answers are rather superficial and short on the one hand (one paragraph long), but too long-winded at the other hand.

For instance, the second question begins as follows:

Are you in luck! Thanks to the Web, medical librarians are everywhere, floating around in the ether, just waiting for questions like this. As a matter of fact, if you look really quick right now, you might see one sitting there up on your shoulder! But seriously, if you have the Internet, you have a librarian…

to simply tell, one can contact nnlm.gov. for this question (web or telephone)…

This information could be much more to the point. On the other hand I wonder, is there no valuable information in (for instance) the OMIM database that the PA/clinician could get for free?

Again, it is a good initiative and I hope JAAPA will succeed in making this a successful column.

HATTIP : pat_devine (twitter)

Advertisements




Educational Videos about Library Stuff

21 03 2009

Yesterday @alisha alerted me to a post of Sheila Webber at the information-literacy blog about a wonderful series of YouTube videos by Llordllam with hand puppets as actors. The videos are a mix of educational videos aimed at librarians, information scientists and library readers. The leading actors are Goose the librarian and Professor Weasel the academic (patron).

The following YouTube video is really superb as well as hilarous. With a typical british sense of humor it tries to make you understand Academic Copyright. Prof Weasel struggles to understand the problems with the traditional journal publication system. Look how he is fooled by the publisher rat.

And for librarians and librarian users this one is a must. Boolean operators explained. Think the jam/bread example will work better than my epistaxis/child example, so who knows I will adapt my slides.

And finally the video “Your Library: A User Centric Experience”. This feels very familiar (the user becomes the king, see also the Flikr pictures in the side bar of our library)

More video’s of Goose and Weasel see page of llordllama on youtube.com and  a facebook page for fans of the video Randy Weasel, Kooei Goose and others

—-

Now, not a Llordllam/Goose/Weasel production, but a very useful video (by paulrobesonlibrary) to illustrate to students the (unusefulness) of Wikipedia as their primary research tool.
Seen at Phil Bradley’s Weblog (No, you can not lower the speed)





A New Blog Carnival: Medlib’s Round

13 01 2009

I’ve participated in several Blog Carnivals in the field of Medicine (and hence called Grand Round). i.e. The Grand Round, the Dutch Grand Round (i.e. see here), and SurgeXperiences. Blog Carnivals are a regular compilation of the “best blogs in a certain area”, hosted by a different blogger each time.

I enjoy participating in a Grand Round, either as submitter or as hosts, and being a medical librarian, I asked myself, why aren’t there any medical blog carnivals around?

Participating in a blog carnival is easy and informative. Why should medical librarians do this? Because you get a quick overview of the best posts in the field of medical librarianship, you learn to know other librarians, you keep well informed about what is going on and you generate traffic to your site (both as a host and a submitter).

Finally librarians not having a blog or people not being medical librarians (health 2.0, web 2.0 people, doctors) might also be interested in getting a quick overview of a field that has their interest.

These are the facts/rules:

  • The Blog Carnival’s name is Medlib’s Round. Please let me now if you have a more original carnival title.
  • For the time being it is a once-monthly Grand Round. The publications are on Tuesday, the submissions are due at Saturdays 00.00 (Dutch Time), or 18.00 EST.
  • All submissions and the Grand Round itself should be written (at least partially) in English.
  • Whether there is a theme or not is up to the host. The advice though is not to be too strict and give a nice compilation.
  • The host posts a call for submissions as early as possible at his or her blog.
  • The schedule and the archive are listed on Laika’s Medliblog on a separate page here.
  • You can submit your post (the permalink) to the blog carnival here or mail the next host before the deadline
    .
  • The first Grand Round (deadline February 7th) is at my place: Laika’s MedLibLog. The theme is rather loose: write about a subject that is close to your heart, whether it is about your patrons, education, PubMed, twitter …. whatever you find important.

What should you do now?

  • Tell me whether you like the idea or not and whether you want to join.
  • Write a post and submit it here (preferred) or mail me at laika dot spoetnik at gmail dot com. laika.spoetnik@gmail.com
  • Tell me whether you want to host a next edition: March*, April, May or June. (comment, mail,twitter)!!
  • Inform others that a Medlibrarian Grand Round is in the making.

Added:

We have a host for the March edition: Dragonfly. Thanks @aldricham

** For schedule see: medlibs-archive

*** Several librarians asked for a more extensive description. I will post this soon.







PubMed Online Search Clinic on ATM!

17 07 2008

Just a short note at the last moment.

Back from vacation I picked up some twitter and blog messages announcing a PubMed search clinic offered at July 17 (today!) at 2pm Eastern time (8pm Amsterdam/Paris time, see timetable throughout the world).

A 30 minute online search clinic will be presented by the NLM® and the National Training Center and Clearinghouse (NTCC) via Adobe® ConnectTM on Thursday, July 17th (2pm ET). The presentation will cover changes to PubMed including changes to how PubMed handles your search (the new automatic term mapping process), the citation sensor, and the beta Advanced Search page.

There is a maximum capacity of 300 participants, on a first come first served base. However, the clinic will be recorded and will be available for viewing later.

To follow the clinic log in at: https://webmeeting.nih.gov/pmupdate08/

or: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/bsd/disted/clinics/pmupdate08.html.
Here you find more info about the clinic, as well as tips for successful participation in the clinic. Be sure to test it beforehand.

Sources:

The Krafty Librarian: @Krafty (twitter) and several posts on her blog.

Nikki (Eagledawgs) guest post on David Rothman’s blog

Background info on what others have blogged about recent Pubmed can be found on another Krafty Librarian’s post and several of my previous post, including PubMed: Past, Present And Future, PART II

************************

Even op de valreep.

Net terug van vakantie zag ik enkele twitters en blogberichten die een “PubMed search clinic” aankondigden.

Deze begint om 8 hr p.m. (welke tijd waar?).

Het duurt 30 minuten en gaat over de recente veranderingen in Pubmed, de nieuwe ATM (automatic term mapping), de citation sensor en Advanced Search Beta.

Er kunnen 300 mensen deelnemen, volgens het “wie het eerst komt, het eerst maalt” principe. De clinic wordt wel opgenomen, zodat je hem later nog eens kunt bekijken.

Inloggen voor 19.00: https://webmeeting.nih.gov/pmupdate08/

Meer info op: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/bsd/disted/clinics/pmupdate08.html.
Inclusief tips om de clinic goed te kunnen volgen.

Bronnen:

The Krafty Librarian: @Krafty (twitter) en verschillende blogberichten.

Nikki (Eagledawgs) te gast op het blog van David Rothman.

Achtergrondinfo over wat anderen van de veranderingen vinden zijn ook te vinden de site van Krafty Librarian (zie hier). Enkele van mijn eerdere berichten zoals PubMed: Past, Present And Future, PART II zijn er ook aan gewijd.





Forget Hyves. Go Twitter!

6 06 2008

Week #10 of the Spoetnik course (library web 2.0 course) was devoted to Hyves (Holland’s most popular website to keep in touch with friends) and other social networking services, like Facebook.

Well finally, at the end of the Spoetnik course, I accepted the invitation of Brughagedis to become his friend at Hyves and in my turn invited a handful of others. I brightened up my background. That was it. My account: http://laika-spoetnik.hyves.nl/)

When I gave an overview of all things learned at Spoetnik (in Dutch) at my blog, Dymphie/Dee adviced me to start twittering, as twitter has its good points -according to her-).

So, May the 27th I started twittering and invited some spoetnik-collegues, although mostly in vain (“not yet another account, please!”). And I’m addicted allready!

Twitter is a free social networking and microblogging service utilising instant messaging, SMS or a web interface. It is meant to keep in touch with friends, relatives and soulmates. It is NOT just bladibladibla in 2 sentences. You have 3 kinds of twitter-messages:

  1. Tell the word what you are doing. Like “I’m eating an apple”, “I’m going home now”, i.e. the Bladibladibla-stuff.
  2. Linking to the posts on your own blog/webpage, like a kind of alert.
  3. Sharing new ideas, thoughts and links to interesting pages.

Well 1 is all right, but only if you’re interested in the people you follow. If you know them or if you would like to know them. So I like the follow Spoetniks for this reason alone.

2 is bad. I dislike it, when one only links to oneselve and doesn’t twitter about anything (1 and 2) else. I cancelled a subscription because of this. I felt taken in, when each time I followed a link I arrived at the same post already found through RSS, Technorati and Co-comment.

3 is it! It is the reason why I became addicted to Twitter in just a few days. I’ve seen so much ‘inside information’, good ideas and wonderful links passing by. The Medlib Geekery site is worth mentioning. I particularly like the contributions of eagledawg, davidlrothman and pfanderson till now. A very good mixture of 1, 2 and 3.

Are there any cons? No, not really.

  • You can take an-RSS feed to reduce the number of readings.
  • However, some things are not directly clear to me. E.g. why can’t I respond to the MedLib-twitter?
  • And if twitter is down, you are down (dependency)
  • Be restrictive in who to follow and
  • even more so in who to accept as a follower. There are some people out there, who are using you to attract people to their site (with dubious content and links). But you can block them. I just blocked Billbettler (all about money)

Want to join: Go to Twitter: http://twitter.com/

Want to be my follower, be my guest: https://twitter.com/laikas

Interested in how twitter works? Look at the famous twitter in plain English by the commoncraft

Interested in why twitter works? Look at this compilation of twitter-experiences of followers from problogger

(the latter video as well as the addicted twitter-figure were picked up from http://www.omolenaar.com/

—————————

NL flag NL vlagWeek #10 van de Spoetnik cursus ging over Hyves, en andere sociale netwerken zoals Facebook.

Pas na week #13 ging ik in op de uitnodiging van Brughagedis in om vrienden te worden op Hyves. Op mijn beurt nodigde ik weer een aantal anderen uit. Ik leukte mijn pagina een beetje op en dat was het zo’n beetje.

Toen ik een overzicht gaf over alle spoetnikweken (“alle 13 goed”) kreeg ik als commentaar van Dymphie/Dee : “Maar begin zeker met Twitteren: daar zitten ook hele leuke kanten aan!”

Dus een week geleden ben ik aan het twitteren geslagen. Ik heb meteen enkele spoetnikers uitgenodigd, maar de meesten sloegen de uitnodiging af: “jé, niet weer een account, sorry!”

Ik ben er al helemaal verknocht eraan.

Twitter is een populaire dienst die vanuit de Verenigde Staten is komen overwaaien naar Europa. Het combineert webloggen met instant messaging, SMS of via een web-interface. Via deze dienst kun je makkelijk contact houden met vrienden, kennissen en geestverwanten. Ik kwam 3 soorten berichten tegen:

  • Mededelingen in de trant van: “ik eet nu een appel” of “ik ga nu naar mijn werk”
  • Links naar eigen website of blog (a.h.w. een alert).
  • Delen van nieuwe ideeen, gedachten, informatie (evt. door linken).
  • 1 is o.k. als het iemand is die je kent of graag wil leren kennen. Ligt er natuurlijk een beetje aan wat hij/zij te vertellen heeft. Vind het leuk om zo iets meer van de andere spoetnikers te weten. Moeten ze het natuurlijk wel niet bij 1 dag twitteren laten…. 😉

    2 vind ik niets. Heb 1 abonnement afgezegd, omdat diegene continu naar zijn eigen posts linkte. Denk je iets nieuws tegen te komen, kom je voor de zoveelste keer op hetzelfde bericht (via RSS, Technorati and Co-comment).

    3 is het helemaal. Zoveel informatie en ideeen gekregen op deze manier. De Medlib Geekery site (geheel op mijn vakgebied) is een aparte vermelding zeker waard. Ik vind de bijdragen van eagledawg, davidlrothman and pfanderson helemaal tof.

    Zijn er ook nadelen. Nauwelijks.

    • Je kunt je abonneren op een RSS-feed, zodat je er maar op bepaalde momenten naar kijkt (bij mij niet nodig).
    • Sommige zaken spreken niet vanzelf. Ik weet bijvoorbeeld niet hoe je een reactie kunt geven, bijv. op de Medlib Geekery site. Je schijnt de twitterpost ook op je blog te kunnen zetten. lijkt me iets teveel van het goede.
    • Als twitter uit de lucht is, zoals onlangs, ben jij het ook (in dit opzicht dan).
    • Het blijft behapbaar als je niet teveel mensen volgt.
    • Let ook op wie jou volgt. Sommige mensen gedragen zich als spammers en lokken andere mensen naar hun site. De info en de links op hun site zijn soms dubieus. Gelukkig kun je ze blokken!

    Wil je het proberen? Ga dan naar Twitter: http://twitter.com/

    Wil je mij volgen? Mijn pagina vind je op https://twitter.com/laikas

    Zie verder hierboven voor enkele aardige video’s over twitter. Misschien tot twitters! 🙂





    MLA 2008: connections (and Spoetnik)

    22 05 2008

    The annual meeting of the Medical Library Association (MLA) that took place this week in Chicago focused on the future of librarianship and (thus) on connections:

    Only connect!…Only connect the prose and the passion… Live in fragments no longer…Only connect.”

    —E. M. Forster, Howards End (1910)

    Well connecting that’s what they do, the US-librarians. No off-season. In line with the theme of MLA’08 they keep on blogging and connecting even when at a meeting.

    It seems like most tools we learned during the Spoetnik-course (weeks #1-#13) (see about and the Dutch Spoetnik-program ) were applied by the advanced medical-library-bloggers.

    15 Bloggers were invited by mail (#1) to become “official conference bloggers” (#2) for MLA 2008, including Michelle Kraft, David Rothman and Eric Schnell. In addition there was at least one unofficial MLA-blogger.

    Their posts were displayed on an official Wetpaint-Wiki (#9), whereas David Rothman pulled together an aggregated Yahoo Pipes feed (#3) of all the MLA postings using Feedburner. I took a subscription, but still have to screen it (way behind again).

    Of course all bloggers already are del.ici.ous (#7), do their librarything (#5), stumble upon, digg it (#13) and LinkedIn (#10).

    Some bloggers shared their agenda using google calendar (#8), or made some appointments by mail (#1) or chatting(#4) and there was also a MLA twitter + feed (#13, #3). Unfortunately there was far less twittering, tweetering and blogging (#13) and thus far less connections than planned, because according to the kraftylibrarian “there was no freaking network on which to be social..” (No wireless access). Bit stupid for a meeting on networks…… 😦

    In addition there was a MLA-flickr-group (#6) , and some bloggers placed a you tube-(#13) or other video- or podcast (#11) on their blog. I will copy (share) one in the next post.

    Interested in more: well (if you are a MLA-member?!) you can watch a live Video Webcast on the first plenary session on “Web 2.0 Tools for Librarians: Description, Demonstration, Discussion, and Debate”.

    Alas I’m not, but several video’s, links and posts on the blogs mentioned above are informative as well -and freely available-. See for instance the blogs that I read (and consulted for this post):

    Michelle Kraft – The Krafty Librarian

    David Rothman – davidrothman.net

    Eric Schnell – The Medium is the Message

    tunaiskewl? ratcatcher? – omg tuna is kewl






    BMI bijeenkomst april 2008

    21 04 2008

    Afgelopen vrijdag 18 April was de Landelijke Dag BMI, CCZ, PBZ en WEB&Z. De BMI is afdeling Biomedische Informatie van de Nederlandse Vereniging voor Beroepsbeoefenaren (NVB). De andere afkortingen staan voor werkgroepen/commissies binnen de NVB: CCZ = Centrale Catalogus Ziekenhuisbibliotheken, BPZ = Bibliothecarissen van Psychiatrische Zorginstellingenen en WEB&Z = voorheen Biomedische werkgroep VOGIN.

    Het programma bestond uit 3 ALV’s, van de CCZ, de BPZ en de BMI, afgewisseld met 3 lezingen. Een beetje lastig 3 ALV’s en 1 zaal. Dat betekende in mijn geval dat ik wel de BMI-ALV heb bijgewoond, maar tijdens de andere ALV’s (langdurig) in de koffieruimte annex gang moest wachten. Weliswaar heb ik die nuttig en plezierig doorgebracht, maar het zou wat gestroomlijnder kunnen. Ook vond ik het bijzonder jammer dat er nauwelijks een plenaire discussie was na de lezingen en dat men geacht werd de discussie letterlijk in de wandelgang voort te zetten. En stof tot discussie was er…..

    Met name de eerste lezing deed de nodige stof opwaaien. Helaas heb ik deze voor de helft gemist, omdat ik in het station Hilversum dat van Amersfoort meende te herkennen 😉 . Gelukkig heeft Ronald van Dieën op zijn blog ook de BMI-dag opgetekend, zodat ik de eerste punten van hem kan overnemen.

    De eerste spreker was Geert van der Heijden, Universitair hoofddocent Klinische Epidemiologie bij het Julius Centrum voor Gezondheidswetenschappen van het UMC Utrecht. Geert is coördinator van het START-blok voor zesdejaars (Supervised Training in professional Attitude, Research and Teaching) en van de Academische Vaardigheden voor het GNK Masteronderwijs. Ik kende Geert oppervlakkig, omdat wij (afzonderlijk) geinterviewd waren voor het co-assistenten blad “Arts in Spe” over de integratie van het EBM-zoekonderwijs in het curriculum. Nu ik hem hier in levende lijve heb gehoord, lees ik zijn interview met heel andere ogen. Ik zag toen meer de overeenkomsten, nu de verschillen.

    Zijn presentatie had als titel: “hoe zoekt de clinicus?”. Wie verwachtte dat Geert zou vertellen hoe de gemiddelde clinicus daadwerkelijk zoekt komt komt bedrogen uit. Geert vertelde vooral de methode van zoeken die hij artsen aanleert/voorhoudt. Deze methode is bepaald niet ingeburgerd en lijkt diametraal te staan tegenover de werkwijze van medisch informatiespecialisten, per slot zijn gehoor van dat moment. Alleen al het feit dat hij beweert dat je VOORAL GEEN MeSH moet gebruiken druist in tegen wat wij medisch informatiespecialisten leren en uitdragen. Het is de vraag of de zaal zo stil was, omdat zij overvallen werd door al het schokkends wat er gezegd werd of omdat men niet wist waar te beginnen met een weerwoord. Ik zag letterlijk een aantal monden openhangen van verbazing.

    Zoals Ronald al stelde was dit een forse knuppel in het hoenderhok van de ‘medisch informatiespecialisten’. Ik deel echter niet zijn mening dat Geert het prima kon onderbouwen met argumenten. Hij is weliswaar een begenadigd spreker en bracht het allemaal met verve, maar ik had toch sterk de indruk dat zijn aanpak vooral practice- of eminence- en niet evidence-based was.

    Hieronder enkele van zijn stellingen, 1ste 5 overgenomen van Ronald:

    1. “Een onderzoeker probeert publicatie air miles te verdienen met impact factors”
    2. “in Utrecht krijgen de studenten zo’n 500 uur Clinical Epidemiology en Evidence Based Practice, daar waar ze in Oxford (roots van EBM) slechts 10 uur krijgen”
    3. “contemporary EBM tactics (Sicily statement). (zie bijvoorbeeld hier:….)
    4. “fill knowledge gaps met problem solving skills”
    5. EBM = eminence biased medicine. Er zit veel goeds tussen, maar pas op….
    6. Belangrijkste doelstelling van literatuuronderzoek: reduceer Numbers Needed to Read.
    7. Vertrouw nooit 2e hands informatie (dit noemen wij voorgefilterde of geaggregeerde evidence) zoals TRIP, UpToDate, Cochrane Systematic Reviews, BMJ Clinical Evidence. Men zegt dat de Cochrane Systematic Reviews zo goed zijn, maar éen verschuiving van een komma heeft duizenden levens gekost. Lees en beoordeel dus de primaire bronnen!
    8. De Cochrane Collaboration houdt zich alleen maar bezig met systematische reviews van interventies, het doet niets aan de veel belangrijker domeinen “diagnose” en “prognose”.
    9. PICO (patient, intervention, comparison, outcome) werkt alleen voor therapie, niet voor andere vraagstukken.
    10. In plaats daarvan de vraag in 3 componenten splitsen: het domein (de categorie patiënten), de determinant (de diagnostische test, prognostische variabele of behandeling) en de uitkomst (ziekte, mortaliteit en …..)
    11. Zoeken doe je als volgt: bedenk voor elk van de 3 componenten zoveel mogelijk synoniemen op papier, verbind deze met “OR”, verbind de componenten met “AND”.
    12. De synoniemen alleen in titel en abstract zoeken (code [tiab]) EN NOOIT met MeSH (MEDLINE Subject Headings). MeSH zijn NOOIT bruikbaar volgens Geert. Ze zijn vaak te breed, ze zijn soms verouderd en je vindt er geen recente artikelen mee, omdat de indexering soms 3-12 maanden zou kosten.
    13. NOOIT Clinical Queries gebruiken. De methodologische filters die in PubMed zijn opgenomen, de zogenaamde Clinical Queries zijn enkel gebaseerd op MeSH en daarom niet bruikbaar. Verder zijn ze ontwikkeld voor heel specifieke onderwerpsgebieden, zoals cardiologie, en daarom niet algemeen toepasbaar.
    14. Volgens de Cochrane zou je als je een studie ‘mist’ de auteurs moeten aanschrijven. Dat lukt van geen kant. Beter is het te sneeuwballen via Web of Science en related articles en op basis daarvan JE ZOEKACTIE AAN TE PASSEN.

    Wanneer men volgens de methode van der Heijden werkt zou men in een half uur klaar zijn met zoeken en in 2 uur de artikelen geselecteerd en beoordeeld hebben. Nou dat doe ik hem niet na.

    De hierboven in rood weergegeven uitspraken zijn niet (geheel) juist. 8. Therapie is naar mijn bescheiden mening nog steeds een belangrijk domein; daarnaast is gaat de Cochrane Collaboration ook SR’s over diagnostische accuratesse studies schrijven. 13. in clinical queries worden (juist) niet alleen MeSH gebruikt.

    In de groen weergegeven uitspraken kan ik me wel (ten dele) vinden, maar ze zijn niet essentieel verschillend van wat ik (men?) zelf nastreef(t)/doe(t), en dat wordt wel impliciet gesuggereerd.
    Vele informatiespecialisten zullen ook:

    • 6 nastreven (door 7 te doen weliswaar),
    • 9 benadrukken (de PICO is inderdaad voor interventies ontwikkeld en minder geschikt voor andere domeinen)
    • en deze analoog aan 10 opschrijven (zij het dat we de componenten anders betitelen).
    • Het aanschrijven van auteurs (14) gebeurt als uiterste mogelijkheid. Eerst doen we de opties die door Geert als alternatief aangedragen worden: het sneeuwballen met als doel de zoekstrategie aan te passen. (dit weet ik omdat ik zelf de cursus “zoeken voor Cochrane Systematic Reviews” geef).

    Als grote verschillen blijven dan over: (7) ons motto: geaggregeerde evidence eerst en (12) zoeken met MeSH versus zoeken in titel en abstract en het feit dat alle componenten met AND verbonden worden, wat ik maar mondjesmaat doe. Want: hoe meer termen/componenten je met “AND” combineert hoe groter de kans dat je iets mist. Soms moet het, maar je gaat niet a priori zo te werk.

    Ik vond het een beetje flauw dat Geert aanhaalde dat er door één Cochrane reviewer een fout is gemaakt, waardoor er duizenden doden zouden zijn gevallen. Laat hij dan ook zeggen dat door het initiatief van de Cochrane er levens van honderd duizenden zijn gered, omdat eindelijk goed in kaart is gebracht welke therapieën nu wel en welke nu niet effectief zijn. Bij alle studies geldt dat je afhankelijk bent van hoe goed te studie is gedaan, van een juiste statistiek etcetera. Voordeel van geaggregeerde evidence is nu net dat een arts niet alle oorspronkelijke studies hoeft door te lezen om erachter te komen wat werkt (NNR!!!). Stel dat elke arts voor elke vraag ALLE individuele studies moet zoeken, beoordelen en moet samenvatten….. Dat zou, zoals de Cochrane het vaak noemt ‘duplication of effort’ zijn. Maar wil je precies weten hoe het zit, of wil je heel volledig zijn dan zul je inderdaad zelf de oorspronkelijke studies moeten zoeken en beoordelen.
    Wel grappig trouwens dat 22 van de 70 artikelen waarvan Geert medeauteur is tot de geaggregeerde evidence (inclusief Cochrane Reviews) gerekend kunnen worden….. Zou hij de lezers ook afraden deze artikelen te selecteren? 😉

    Voor wat betreft het zoeken via de MeSH. Ik denk dat weinig ‘zoekers’ louter en alleen op MeSH zoeken. Wij gebruiken ook tekstwoorden. In hoeverre er gebruik van gemaakt wordt hangt erg van het doel en de tijd af. Je moet steeds afwegen wat de voor- en de nadelen zijn. Door geen MeSH te gebruiken, maak je ook geen gebruik van de synoniemen functie en de mogelijkheid tot exploderen (nauwere termen meenemen). Probeer maar eens in een zoekactie alle synoniemen voor kanker te vinden: cancer, cancers , tumor, tumour(s), neoplasm(s), malignancy (-ies), maar daarnaast ook alle verschilende kankers: adenocarcinoma, lymphoma, Hodgkin’s disease, etc. Met de MeSH “Neoplasms” vind je in een keer alle spellingswijzen, synoniemen en alle soorten kanker te vinden.

    Maar in ieder geval heeft Geert ons geconfronteerd met een heel andere zienswijze en ons een spiegel voorgehouden. Het is soms goed om even wakkergeschud te worden en na te denken over je eigen (soms te ?) routinematige aanpak. Geert ging niet de uitdaging uit de weg om de 2 zoekmethodes met elkaar te willen vergelijken. Dus wie weet wat hier nog uit voortvloeit. Zouden we tot een consensus kunnen komen?

    De volgende praatjes waren weliswaar minder provocerend, maar toch zeker de moeite waard.

    De web 2.0-goeroe Wouter Gerritsma (WoWter) praatte ons bij over web 2.0, zorg 2.0 en (medische) bibliotheek 2.0. Zeer toepasselijk met zeer moderne middelen: een powerpointpresentatie via slideshare te bewonderen en met een WIKI, van waaruit hij steeds enkele links aanklikte. Helaas was de internetverbinding af en toe niet zo 2.0, zodat bijvoorbeeld deze beeldende YOU TUBE-uitleg Web 2.0 … The machine is us/ing us niet afgespeeld kon worden. Maar handig van zo’n wiki is natuurlijk dat je het alsnog kunt opzoeken en afspelen. In de presentatie kwamen wat practische voorbeelden aan de orde (bibliotheek, zorg, artsen) en werd ingegaan op de verschillende tools van web 2.0: RSS, blogs, gepersonaliseerde pagina’s, tagging en wiki’s. Ik was wel even apetrots dat mijn blog alsmede dat van de bibliotheker even als voorbeeld getoond werden van beginnende (medische bieb) SPOETNIKbloggers. De spoetnikcursus en 23 dingen werden sowieso gepromoot om te volgen als beginner. Voor wie meer wil weten, kijk nog eens naar de wiki: het biedt een mooi overzicht.

    Als laatsten hielden Tanja van Bon en Sjors Clemens een duo-presentatie over e-learning. Als originele start begonnen ze met vragen te stellen in plaats van ermee te eindigen. Daarna gaven ze een leuke introductie over e-learning en lieten ze zien hoe ze dit in hun ziekenhuis implementeerden.

    Tussen en na de lezingen was er ruim tijd om met elkaar van gedachten te wisselen, aan het slot zelfs onder genot van een borrel voor wie niet de BOB was. Zeker een heel geslaagde dag. Hier ga ik vaker naar toe!

    **************************************************************************************************

    met de W: ik zie dat de bibliotheker inmiddels ook een stukje heeft geschreven over de lezing van Geert van der Heiden. Misschien ook leuk om dit te lezen.

    N.B. VOOR WIE DE HELE PRESENTATIE VAN GEERT WIL ZIEN, DEZE IS MET ZIJN TOESTEMMING GEZET OP

    http://www.slideshare.net/llkool/bmi-18-april-2008-geert-van-der-heijden/