Webicina Goes Mobile with a Free iPhone App.

15 03 2011

At this blog I have mentioned Bertalan (Berci) Mesko a couple of times. Berci, a MD who does a PhD in personalized genetics, is most famous for his award-winning blog Scienceroll, his health 2.0 presentations and  his creation of Webicina, a  free service that curates medical social media resources for medical professionals and e-patients.

Webicina has greatly evolved, since I’ve reviewed it 2 years ago in “PeRSSonalized Medicine – and its alternatives: it covers 80 topics, 3000 resources and 17 languages. Most importantly patients and doctors find it extremely useful to keep up-to-date via this customizable aggregator of quality medical resources in social media (Medical Journals, Blogs, News and Web 2.0 tools). I often see it mentioned on Twitter.

I’m glad to announce that Webicina is now available as a free mobile app. This application makes it easier to access the information on Webicina. It also includes a Health 2.0 Quiz which was designed to help empowered patients and medical professionals know more about the world of medicine and social media. You can download the Webicina app for free in the iTunes store. It is also compatible with iPod touch, and the  iPad.

Unfortunately I couldn’t test the app for you, because I have no I-phone. But I understood I don’t have to wait for long before the Android version comes out.

Meanwhile Ivor Kovic did test the Webicina app. This is his opinion:

The app is very nicely designed, and the cool thing is that you can browse through all the listed resources inside the app, without the need to go back and forward between your web browser. In just a few minutes of playing around with it, I found some great new resources and reminded myself of all the great content inside the Emergency Medicine category in which this blog is also featured. I can already see that I will be spending many hours exploring valuable new content on my phone using Webicina app, and if you want to stay on top of your game in your field, I strongly suggest you do the same.

Read more: http://ivor-kovic.com/blog/?p=545#ixzz1Ggsug75M

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Lanyrd, the Social Conference Directory

24 11 2010

I’m a blogger who usually needs quite some time to write blog posts. However, I just learned about a new tool that I need not describe in detail. Firstly, because Heidi Allen just described the tool in a blog post here. Secondly, because the tool is so intuitive and easy.

I’m talking about Lanyrd, a directory of geeky events, technical conferences and social meetings.

It is really so simple and effective. Please follow me.

You go to http://lanyrd.com/, connect via OAuth to Twitter and before you can count to 3, Lanyrd shows you the conferences your friends on Twitter are going to as a speaker (blue border) or an attendee. You can also see friends who keep track of the conference (vague).

Unfortunately purely scientific or medical conferences are not included, but who knows what Lanyrd is up to.

You can track the conferences by subscribing in iCal / Outlook. It is also easy to add conferences.

I might go to Medicine 2.0, but I didn’t make up my mind yet. If I click on the link I see the following page:

You can click on “Attend” or on “Track” if this applies. Furthermore you get an overview of the conference: the location, the link to the website, the Twitter account, the hashtag used in tweets (#med2) and of the speakers.

Oh …. there are none yet, so I added a few.

It is easy to do, people who have never logged into the site can also be added. However, if helps to know the exact twitter name, if many people on Twitter share the same name (else you have to check all the profiles generated with Twitter search).

Lanyrd is the baby of the recently married couple Simon Willison and Natalie Downe. And as it goes with babies, they grow up.

What can we expect the next few years?

Simon in the Guardian:

“We have lots of exciting plans for Lanyrd’s future. One of the things we’re very keen on is gathering information on past conferences – speaker slides, videos, audio recordings and write-ups. In five years’ time, we hope we’ll have the best collection of conference coverage possible.”

Credits to Heidi Allen (@dreamingspires) and Anne Marie Cunningham (@amcunningham) who discussed Lanyrd on Twitter. As said, Heidi wrote a post on Lanyrd, and Anne Marie wrote a short blogpost at Wishful Thinking in Medical Education on the need to find list of upcoming medical or health conferences- and the hashtags that would be used to cover them on twitter. The Solution as it appeared was Lanyrd (at least for some of the conferences).





Implementing Twitter in a Health Sciences Library

23 11 2010

Twitter describes itself as “a service for friends, family, and co-workers to communicate and stay connected through the exchange of quick, frequent answers to one simple question: What are you doing?” [2].

The “answers” are equally simple, because the tweet (that what is being “said”) must fit in 140 characters. The tweet does not only contain plain text, but can contain short-URL’s which link to webpages, figures and videos.

However, tweets have evolved to more than everyday experiences, and take the shape of shared links to interesting content on the web, conversations around hot topics (using hashtags (#), like #cochrane OR #ev2010 (conference evidence2010)), photos, videos, music, and real-time accounts of a newsworthy event [2]. Furthermore, Twitter is now also used by institutions and companies  for branding, marketing and costumer service. This also applies to libraries, with public libraries leading the way. Health science libraries started twittering  in 2009 and as of 2010 there were (only) 24 of them. In addition, the National Library of Medicine (NLM) and most of the regional National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LMs) have a Twitter presence.  I follow @NLM_LHC and @NLM newsroom, for instance.

The NYU Health Sciences Libraries (NYUHSL) began using Twitter in June 2009. The team, consisting of the Director, the Emerging Technologies Librarian and the Web Services Librarian of the NYUHSL, described their experience with the implementation of Twitter in the latest Medical Reference Services Quarterly [1]

The main aim of their Twitter account was to disseminate topics similar to what was posted on their Web site: news about facilities, resources, handy tidbits, services offered, downtime, events, and staff, as well as breaking news.

What was their approach and what were their main experiences?

  • Claim your name, as soon as you vaguely consider using Twitter!
    In the case of  NYUHSL, their usual library acronym was already taken, so they took a similar name: @NYU_HSL (because of the 140-character limit, it is advisable to use as few characters as possible: this will leave more room when somebody replies to you).
  • They added the library logo as a profile picture and included a link to the library website plus a short “bio”.
  • First the team shared responsibility for posting on Twitter (by logging in into the NYU_HSL account and posting), but this posed coordination problems (like double postings, irregular postings). Therefore it was decided that team members would post according to a schedule. Furthermore there was a 2-week rotation. Any important news was tweeted promptly and interesting news from other Twitter users was occasionally retweeted .
  • Later CoTweet was used. This is a free tool, which -as its name suggests- allows multiple people to communicate through corporate Twitter accounts and stay in sync while doing so. One person is the account owner, who creates and maintains the account and gives other people access to it. The individual members can post to Twitter via the Co_tweet account.  CoTweet uses bit.ly as an URL-shortener, displays some (rudimentary) stats, allows scheduling and archiving of tweets and has some other slick features for corporate Twitter use. (See  this post at News CNET for a comparison between CoTweet and the better known Hootsuite)
  • What I most liked about the paper – besides the description of CoTweet – is the content flow diagram the authors used (adapted below). Posts from their library blog were automatically cross-posted via RSS to Twitter using Twitterfeed, whereas tweets were in their turn automatically posted on Facebook. To this end a Twitter Tab was added to the NYUHSL Facebook fan page. In addition it remained possible to post manually to the different social networking tools and to respond to followers or retweet messages of other users.

  • The team also had to find the right tone for Twitter: the style of tweets is more informal than the style of blog posts. They emphasize the importance of keeping the nuances of different social networking sites in mind when establishing an institutional presence.
  • They promoted Twitter in many ways:
    • A large Twitter mascot (blue bird) with the text: “Follow NYU_HSL on Twitter” was placed on the prominent Web’s site feature bar (see Fig. below). Unfortunately the twitter message only appears when you press “next”. Most users will not do this.
    • Creation of a small poster about Twitter.
    • A word of mouth campaign (in orientation presentations, and a tag line with Twitter account information in e-mail correspondence to students: according to Pew Internet [3] college graduates are among the biggest users of Twitter.
    • description and promotion of the Twitter account in the library’s e-mail newsletter and in blog posts.

And finally, we have to come up with the Key Question: was it all worth the effort?

At the time of writing the NYU-HSL had 66 followers, 27 of which were affiliated with the NYU (others being other libraries and librarians for instance). This is not a very big (target) audience, but I agree with the authors that the definition of success in social media is relative.  There were clear (subjective) benefits, like the low cost, ease of use, low effort to maintain the service on the one hand and the possibility to engage the audience, get user opinions and the opportunity to fix problems quickly on the other hand. Furthermore it’s presence on Twitter enhances the library’s reputation, as the library is making an effort to extend beyond its walls and confirms the role of librarians as technology leaders.

I also agree with the library’s basic principle “to give users as many options as possible to keep current with library news, resources, and services.” In this regard Twitter is a simple and effective method for promotion.

Thus health, medical and other libraries. I would say, if you are not twittering, give it a try and read the reviewed paper [1] for more tips. One of these tips is to connect with other libraries on Twitter as to learn from their experiences.

Credits:  @DrShock dm-ed (direct messaged) me on Twitter to alert me to the paper. Thanks Walter!

References (all assessed 2010-11-23)

  1. Cuddy, C., Graham, J., & Morton-Owens, E. (2010). Implementing Twitter in a Health Sciences Library Medical Reference Services Quarterly, 29 (4), 320-330 DOI: 10.1080/02763869.2010.518915
  2. Mashable http://mashable.com/guidebook/twitter/
  3. Lenhart, A., and Fox, S. ‘‘Twitter and Status Updating.’’ Report: Web 2.0, Social Networking. Pew Internet & American Life Project (February 12, 2009). Pew Internet: http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2009/Twitter-and-status-updating.aspx




Expert Curators, WisdomCards & The True Wisdom of @organizedwisdom

9 11 2010

Note added 2010-11-12:  Anyone who wishes to can now email info@organizedwisdom.com to let his/her profile as expert curator removed from the site of Organized Wisdom (see comments by Unity Stoakes, Co-founder OrganizedWisdom)

————————————————————————————————-

Twitter and other Social Media can be full of random rubbish, but can also contain useful information. Personally, I use Twitter for work-related tweets about 95 percent of the time, and I choose the people I follow carefully so that I’m not overwhelmed by a flood of tweets. As I’ve said before: people who I follow are my human filter to the Twitter Noise. And I hope that is vice versa.

Organized Wisdom (http://organizedwisdom.com and @organizedwisdom on Twitter) is a 3-4 year old company that uses a similar approach to filter useful health information out of the daily junk.

Or as Steve Krein, CEO of Organized Wisdom tells Matthew Holt of the Health Care Blog in an interview (video below)

Organized Wisdom has created a new way for people to use the internet to solve their health problems by using experts. We think experts are the missing gap between two worlds: heavily simplified health encyclopedias & dictionaries and complex stuff on the internet (where you are quickly overwhelmed by all the health stuff).

OrganizedWisdom® uses WisdomCards™ , a unique service which helps people easily discover great links, curated by experts and organized by topic.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

In principle this is an excellent idea, and that is why I originally joined Organized Wisdom.

I have a badge on my blog and I’m a so-called expert curator and contributor for Medical Education and Medical Librarian (topics)

Profile now removed from Organized Wisdom (2010-11-11)

Profile now removed from Organized Wisdom (2010-11-11)

So far so good. Besides being a creator of content (which is nothing more than being a source for automatically created links present in my health-care related tweets), I’m also a “consumer”. Because I’m interested in Endocrinology I follow @EndocrinologyOW on Twitter. There are many other OW topics on Twitter, that you can follow.

Recently Organized Wisdom launched a new account @ActivityDigest, which -it won’t surprise you- gives an activity digest of the curators. Apparently to stimulate “engagement” (Oh wonderful CEO-terminologies).

This is why I got this tweet in my twitter stream (I don’t follow @ActivityDigest, but I see its tweets once it mentions me).

I felt flattered: “recommended as an expert curator for Organized Wisdom“…. That sounds like any scientists could only dream of.

And before I realised it, I retweeted the message (repeated the message to my twitter stream).

Immediately I felt a bit uncomfortable. And this feeling grew as I saw almost everybody in my Twitter stream being labeled as an “Expert Curator”. … and everybody retweeting his/her “pat on the back” and congratulating each other….

I don’t have the original retweets, but a search for “Expert Curator” shows that last weeks “expert-curator”-retweets still continue

  1. American Heart Assoc
    American_Heart Thanks! RT @ActivityDigest @American_Heart was recommended as an Expert Curator for quality links, expertise. Congrats!…
  2. Rudi'sGlutenFree
    rudisglutenfree Cool! RT @ActivityDigest: @rudisglutenfree recommended as Expert Curator 4 quality links, expertise. http://bit.ly/9IOHME @OrganizedWisdom
  3. EndlessBeauty.com
    _EndlessBeauty Oh wow thank you @ActivityDigest!! We appreciate the recommendation for an Expert Curator 🙂 @organizedwisdom
  4. Michael Bermant, MD
    DrBermant Michael Bermant, MD – OrganizedWisdom Contributor Profile http://bit.ly/99hDES Learn why he is an Expert Curator, see links he has shared.
  5. shade gardener
    shadegardener @ActivityDigest Wow, I never heard of Expert Curator for quality links before, thanks for letting me know I was awarded! 🙂
  6. Bamboo Inspiration
    bambooinspired @ActivityDigest Hi and thanks for the Expert Curator for quality links mention! That’s really appreciated
  7. BMJ Group
    BMJ_Group Thanks :o) RT @ActivityDigest: @BMJ_Group was recommended as an Expert Curator for quality links, expertise. Congrats! http://bit.ly/an2Vio
  8. Imagine Nursing
    ImagineNursing Nursing Tweets: BMJ_Group: Thanks :o) RT @ActivityDigest: @BMJ_Group was recommended as an Expert Curator for qu… http://bit.ly/954uDQ

this quote was brought to you by quoteurl

Note (1) the real surprise of some people (Wow, I never heard of Expert Curator for quality links before) and (2) the chaff (endless beauty) between the wheat ((BMJ_GroupAmerican_Heart). I mean: if some of these accounts would start following me, I would probably block them and report them for spam! Really!

Activity Digest  continues its activities. Now everybody knows he or she is a curator,  it tweets what the curators have achieved this week. Probably OW is hoping curators retweet their achievements and spread the word for them. We are not only used as living filters, but even more so as “living ads”!

It made me frown, but the worst thing that struck me today is that the twittered information isn’t really filtered for quality. About a quarter is what I would call SCAM or at least CRAP.

Look on which WisdomCardI land on when I follow a tweet “Tired Of Fake Anti-aging Creams? (Try HGH Energizer”): rubbish by natural healers etc (spread by @EndocrinologyOW)
Similar cards are antiaging medicine that gets at the hormone causessupplements for diabetes support and what about the Type  2 Diabetes Natural Treatment-card. Cinnamon as treatment? Anyone? And of course there are also chiropractor WisdomCard™ cards where “expert curators share great links about chiropractor”.

Part of the problem may be that Organized Wisdom doesn’t only share links from “Health Centers”, but also from Wellness Centers (AgingDietExercise & Fitness etc) and Living Centers (BeautyCookingEnvironment). Apparently one card can have information for 2 or 3 centers (diabetes and multivitamins for example)

I feel used.

Organized Wisdom uses the credibility of me and other curators, including so-called “top expert curators” as Dr Pho (Kevin MD – blog), to cover up the incredibility of others, with the intention to lure users in.

Who doesn’t believe top curators like the ones below? Who doesn’t want to be considered one?

Going through the “expert curator” Twitter search, I saw (only) one very sensible man, EdBennett, who manages web sites for a large academic medical center and creates overviews of social media usage by hospitals. Friendly, he asked to be removed from the Expert Curator list.

I think I will try the same, although (considering the answer of dr Ves), that may not be a sinecure.

Perhaps we can try a concerted action. You know, the power of the crowd….

  1. Ed Bennett
    EdBennett Dear @OrganizedWisdom – please remove me as an “Expert Curator” from your site. Thank you.
  2. Ves Dimov, M.D.
    DrVes @EdBennett I tried this several times but I don’t think it worked… 🙂
  3. Ed Bennett
    EdBennett @DrVes I like to start by asking nicely.

this quote was brought to you by quoteurl

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Added 2010-11-12: For more striking examples, please read the comments. (anti-quack people “recommending” homeopathy treatment of cancer; dr ves -true expert on asthma beaten by the author of slim-fit-health.info/newsletters/fat-loss-now/…..

Added 2010-11-12: I found a 2 year old post from TechCrunch called OrganizedWisdom, the “Mahalo For Health”, Raises $2.3 Million. Some of the commenters came to the same conclusions (why didn’t anybody pick this up? Vanity? Trust? Ignorance? -this also applies to me I must admit):

Like this one from @Holly (emphasis mine)

I am glad you brought up the “written by people who do not have a clue, let alone ANY medical training [of any kind] at all.” I have no experience with any kind of medical education, knowledge or even the slightest clue of a tenth of the topics covered on OW, yet for some reason they tried to recruit me to review cards there!?! That was my first impression of the company, if they have a bunch of people like me as the final word on their cards, the info will be so off base the site will give the big fail so quick. In my opinion, medical knowledge or advice is not something I would trust from any random joe, so why would I trust anything from random people who work there, considering they have absolutely no experience or knowledge? They advertise that a doctor reviews every card, personally I think that is a bunch of BS, considering neither me nor others that I know work higher up there have any training whatsoever, guess anyone can be a doctor now…

And Josh,

You are correct about some health sites’ contents written by people with limited or non-existent medical knowledge or training; the public at large do not know this. In fact, one of my neighbors, a “MA” or “Medical Assistant,” writes for OrganizedWisdom.com.





Friday Foolery #36 : Friends on Facebook

15 10 2010

I found this hilarious South Park video about Facebook Friends on Jud’s Education Emporium.

It was used to illustrate that “friending” doesn’t mean a lot, although in this video it does mean an awful lot to some real-life friends of Stan.

In real life this happens too. See Paul’s “outpouring” on Facebook…..

(relatie=relation(ship))

Paul has a relation (on Facebook)

 





MedLib’s Round is up at DigiCMB

11 09 2010

This months MedLib’s Round is up at DigiCMB the blog of Guus van den Brekel.

The title is Emerging Technology in Medical and Health Information.

Unfortunately there were few submissions. By adding a lot of useful information and links himself, Guus succeeded in composing a rich edition on the topic. You can read it all here

His intention was that colleagues specifically posted on the theme ànd commented on his Continuing Education Course (CEC) at EAHIL2010. You can still do the latter.
Here is the public course:
http://www.netvibes.com/emergingtechnologiesinlibraries
.

Considering the small niche of the MedLibs Round, and the fact that this round is not purely meant for medical librarians alone, I wouldn’t recommend strict themes. It would be perfect if participants to the round would write a post specifically for the round on a topic specifically fitting the theme, but in reality that is seldom done.

I had hoped that it would go as easy as the weekly Grand Rounds, where people automatically start submitting and keep an eye themselves on who is hosting the rounds, but that is not the case. But perhaps this is a bit naïve.

Still it is a good round with lot of quality submissions and excellent hosts. So we surely will continue, although likely under a new name  (soon to be announced)

The next 3 hosts are cream of the crop again:

You can already start submitting the permalink of your post HERE at the Blog Carnival.

The next submission deadline is October the 3rd.





Fighting “Powerpoint-Death” by Science, Prezi or…?!

24 08 2010
Audience response radio frequency keypad with ...

Image via Wikipedia

Recently Kevin Clauson [@kevinclauson] made another great presentation, called the “Science behind Engaging Students in Class”. The presentation focuses on the use of “clickers” or an audience response system (ARS) to engage the audience (here mainly students in a class). It is an expanded version of “How to Fight Lecturalgia“.

First Kevin asks the audience questions about their knowledge/use of ARS -using the ARS system, of course-. Next he goes more deeply into the need to engage the audience (attention span, boredom) and then he addresses the successes and pitfalls of ARS.

Each statement has a scientific underpinning, and a reference to it.

For instance, one conclusion is that use of ARS improves performance with analytical type exam questions, but not with memorization exam questions.

Kevin stresses that ARS  it is just another tool, albeit a powerful one.

Of course you have to avoid the usual presentation-killer aspects of PowerPoint, like including too many slides, bullets and data, as so wonderfully illustrated by the famous “Dead by Powerpoint” presentation. I included it below, in case you’ve never seen it.

It also contains recommendations how to  improve your PowerPoint.

This following video elaborates on the same theme. It is called “Life after Death by PowerPoint”. Not an appropriate name, because it only magnifies Powerpoints killer-points. You might enjoy it though (if you can put up with the canned laugh).

Below is another presentation about the science of presentations. And although I noticed little science in it, I did find the CEO-presentation interesting because it discusses the use of live tweeting (and blogging) to give “contagious talks” (you know Twitter going “viral”).





Friday Foolery #31 Waving goodbye… (or not?)

13 08 2010

WHEN THE SHIP SANK…

(it was August 4th,  I remember I was at home multitasking
(twittering, blogging, mailing, scratching my back, playing
patience, humming a tune and looking out of the window)

WHEN..


THE REASON BEHIND IT


WHAT’s NEXT?

HERE AT WORDSTREAM THEY THINK THE SAME.

THE GOOGLE FLOPS & FAILURE GRAVEYARD IS EXTENDING

(HT: @drves)

Google Flops & Failures – The Failed Google Graveyard

 Google Failures and Google Flops - A list of Google Mistakes

I still miss Google Notebook . AND Google Wave sure had great potential

To think that a year ago I told people in a workshop that Google Wave could make their live easy 😉


Google Wave had potential, especially as a collaboration tool….

See this post at Tip of the Iceberg (how appropriate) describing how Google Wave was used  to collaborate with students.

Since much of the Code is open sourceambitious developers may pick up where Google left.

But some people hope Google Wave may be saved. It might for instance be worth saving for health systems.

Want to Save the Wave”? ….. Then click on the following image and express your support.

click to sign the petition

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Webicina Presents: PeRSSonalized Medical Librarianship: Selected Blogs, News, Journals and More

13 08 2010

One and a half-year ago I wrote about PeRSSonalized Medicine, developed by Bertalan Mesko or Berci. It is part of Webicina, which “aims to help physicians and other healthcare people to enter the web 2.0 era with quality medical information and selected online medical resources”.

The RSS in PeRSSonalized Medicine stands for Real Simple Syndication, which is a format for delivering regularly changing web content, i.e. from Journals. However, if you use PeRSSonalized Medicine, you don’t need to have a clue what RSS is all about. It is easy to use and you can personalize it (hence the name)

In the previous post I discussed several alternatives of PeRSSonalized Medicine. You can never tell how a new idea, or project or a new business will develop. We have seen Clinical Reader come and disappear. PeRSSonalized Medicine however really boomed. Why? Because it is free, because it has an altruistic goal (facilitate instead of earning money), because users are involved in the development and because it keeps evolving on basis of feedback.

PeRSSonalized Medicine develops fast. There is not a week that I don’t see a new section: Nephrology, Genetics, Diabetes whatever.

And this week tada tada tada … it is the turn of the Medical Librarianship, with Journals, Blogs, News and Web 2.0 tools. Please have a look yourself. You can personalize it at wish, and if you miss something, please mail to Webicina.

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Collaborating and Delivering Literature Search Results to Clinical Teams Using Web 2.0 Tools

8 08 2010

ResearchBlogging.orgThere seem to be two camps in the library, the medical and many other worlds: those who embrace Web 2.0, because they consider it useful for their practice and those who are unaware of Web 2.0 or think it is just a fad. There are only a few ways the Web 2.0-critical people can be convinced: by arguments (hardly), by studies that show evidence of its usefulness and by examples of what works and what doesn’t work.

The paper of Shamsha Damani and Stephanie Fulton published in the latest Medical Reference Services Quarterly [1] falls in the latter category. Perhaps the name Shamsha Damania rings a bell: she is a prominent twitterer and has written quest posts at this blog on several occasions (here, herehere and here)

As clinical librarians at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Shamsha and Stephanie are immersed in clinical teams and provide evidence-based literature for various institutional clinical algorithms designed for patient care.

These were some of the problems the clinical librarians encountered when sharing the results of their searches with the teams by classic methods (email):

First, team members were from different departments and were dispersed across the sprawling hospital campus. Since the teams did not meet in person very often, it was difficult for the librarians to receive timely feedback on the results of each literature search. Second, results sent from multiple database vendors were either not received or were overlooked by team members. Third, even if users received the bibliography, they still had to manually search for and locate the full text of articles. The librarians also experimented with e-mailing EndNote libraries; however, many users were not familiar with EndNote and did not have the time to learn how to use it. E-mails in general tended to get lost in the shuffle, and librarians often found themselves re-sending e-mails with attachments. Lastly, it was difficult to update the results of a literature search in a consistent manner and obtain meaningful feedback from the entire team.

Therefore, they tried several Web 2.0 tools for sharing search results with their clinical teams.
In their article, the librarians share their experience with the various applications they explored that allowed centralization of the search results, provided easy online access, and enabled collaboration within the group.

Online Reference Management Tools were the librarians’ first choice, since these are specifically designed to help users gather and store references from multiple databases and allow sharing of results. Of the available tools, Refworks was eventually not tested, because it required two sets of usernames and passwords. In contrast, EndNote Web can be accessed from any computer with a username and password. Endnoteweb is suitable for downloading and managing references from multiple databases and for retrieving full text papers as well as  for online collaboration. In theory, that is. In practice, the team members experienced several difficulties: trouble to remember the usernames and passwords, difficulties using the link resolver and navigating to the full text of each article and back to the Endnote homepage. Furthermore, accessing the full text of each article was considered a too laborious process.

Next, free Social bookmarking sites were tested allowing users to bookmark Web sites and articles, to share the bookmarks and to access them from any computer. However, most team members didn’t create an account and could therefore not make use of the collaborative features. The bookmarking sites were deemed ‘‘user-unfriendly’’, because  (1) the overall layout and the presentation of results -with the many links- were experienced as confusing,  (2) sorting possibilities were not suitable for this purpose and (3) it was impossible to search within the abstracts, which were not part of the bookmarked records. This was true both for Delicious and Connotea, even though the latter is more apt for science and medicine, includes bibliographic information and allows import and export of references from other systems. An other drawback was that the librarians needed to bookmark and comment each individual article.

Wikis (PBWorks and SharePoint) appeared most user-friendly, because they were intuitive and easy to use: the librarians had created a shared username and password for the entire team, the wiki was behind the hospital’s firewall (preferred by the team) and the users could access the articles with one click. For the librarians it was labor-consuming as they annotated the bibliographies, published it on the wiki and added persistent links to each article. It is not clear from the article how final reference lists were created by the team afterwards. Probably by cut & paste, because Wikis don’t seem suitable as a Word processor nor  are they suitable for  import and export of references.

Some Remarks

It is informative to read the pros and cons of the various Web 2.0 tools for collaborating and delivering search results. For me, it was even more valuable to read how the research was done. As the authors note (quote):

There is no ‘‘one-size-fits-all’’ approach. Each platform must be tested and evaluated to see how and where it fits within the user’s workflow. When evaluating various Web 2.0 technologies, librarians should try to keep users at the forefront and seek feedback frequently in order to provide better service. Only after months of exploration did the librarians at MD Anderson Cancer Center learn that their users preferred wikis and 1-click access to full-text articles. Librarians were surprised to learn that users did not like the library’s link resolvers and wanted a more direct way to access information.

Indeed, there is no ‘‘one-size-fits-all’’ approach. For that reason too, the results obtained may only apply in certain settings.

I was impressed by the level of involvement of the clinical librarians and the time they put not only in searching, but also in presenting the data, in ranking the references according to study design, publication type, and date and in annotating the references. I hope they prune the results as well, because applying this procedure to 1000 or more references is no kidding. And, although it may be ideal for the library users, not all librarians work like this. I know of no Dutch librarian who does. Because of the workload such a ready made wiki may not be feasible for many librarians .

The librarians starting point was to find an easy and intuitive Web based tool that allowed collaborating and sharing of references.
The emphasis seems more on the sharing, since end-users did not seem to collaborate via the wikis themselves. I also wonder if the simpler and free Google Docs wouldn’t fulfill most of the needs. In addition, some of the tools might have been perceived more useful if users had received some training beforehand.
The training we offer in Reference Manager, is usually sufficient to learn to work efficiently with this quite complex reference manager tool. Of course, desktop software is not suitable for collaboration online (although it could always be easily exported to an easier system), but a short training may take away most of the barriers people feel when using a new tool (and with the advantage that they can use this tool for other purposes).

In short,

Of the Web 2.0 tools tested, wikis were the most intuitive and easy to use tools for collaborating with clinical teams and for delivering the literature search results. Although it is easy to use by end-users, it seems very time-consuming for librarians, who make ready-to-use lists with annotations.

Clinical teams of MD Anderson must be very lucky with their clinical librarians.

Reference
Damani S, & Fulton S (2010). Collaborating and delivering literature search results to clinical teams using web 2.0 tools. Medical reference services quarterly, 29 (3), 207-17 PMID: 20677061

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Added: August 9th 2010, 21:30 pm

On basis of the comments below (Annemarie Cunningham) and on Twitter (@Dymphie – here and here (Dutch)) I think it is a good idea to include a figure of one of the published wiki-lists.

It looks beautiful, but -as said- where is the collaborative aspect? Like Dymphie I have the impression that these lists are no different from the “normal” reference lists. Or am I missing something? I also agree with Dymphie that instructing people in Reference Manager may be much more efficient for this purpose.

It is interesting to read Christina Pikas view about this paper. At her blog Christina’s Lis Rant (just moved to the new Scientopia platform) Christina first describes how she delivers her search results to her customers and which platforms she uses for this. Then she shares some thoughts about the paper, like:

  • they (the authors) ruled out RefWorks because it required two sets of logins/passwords – hmm, why not RefWorks with RefShare? Why two sets of passwords?
  • SharePoint wikis suck. I would probably use some other type of web part – even a discussion board entry for each article.
  • they really didn’t use the 2.0 aspects of the 2.0 tools – particularly in the case of the wiki. The most valued aspects were access without a lot of logins and then access to the full text without a lot of clicks.

Like Christina,  I would be interested in hearing other approaches – particularly using newer tools.






Kaleidoscope 2: 2010 wk 31

8 08 2010

Almost a year ago I started a new series Kaleidoscope, with a “kaleidoscope” of facts, findings, views and news gathered over the last 1-2 weeks.
It never got beyond the first edition. Perhaps the introduction of this Kaleidoscope was to overwhelming & dazzling: lets say it was very rich in content. Or as
Andrew Spong tweeted: “Part cornucopia, part cabinet of wonders, it’s @laikas Kaleidoscope 2009 wk 47”

This is  a reprise in a (somewhat) “shorter” format. Lets see how it turns out.

This edition will concentrate on Social Media (Blogging, Twitter Google Wave). I fear that I won’t keep my promise, if I deal with more topics.

Medical Grand Rounds and News from the Blogosphere

Life in the Fast Lane is the host of this weeks Grand Rounds. This edition is truly terrific, if not terrifying. Not only does it contain “killer posts”, each medblogger has also been coupled to its preferred deadly Aussie critter.
Want to know how a full time ER-doctor/educator/textbook author/blogger/editor /health search engine director manages to complete work-related tasks …when the kids are either at school or asleep(!), then read this recent interview with Mike Cadogan, the founder of Life in the Fast Lane.

Don’t forget to submit your medical blog post to next weeks Grand Rounds over at Dispatch From Second Base. Instructions and theme details can be found on the post “You are invited to Grand Rounds!“ (update here).

And certainly don’t forget to submit your post related to medical information to the MedLibs Round (about medical information) here. More details can be found at Laika’s MedLibLog and at Highlight Health, the host of the upcoming Edition.
(sorry, writing this post took longer than I thought: you have one day left for submission)

Dr Shock of the blog with the same name advises us to submit good quality, easy-to-understand posts dealing with science, environment or medicine to Scientia Pro Publica via the blog carnival submission form.

There is a new on-line science blogging community – Scientopia, till now mostly consisting of bloggers who left Scienceblogs after (but not because of) Pepsigate. New members can only be added to the collective by invitation (?). Obviously, pepsi-researchers will not be invited, but it remains to be seen who will…  Hopefully it doesn’t become an elitist club.
Virginia Heffernan (NY-Times) has an outspoken opinion about the (ex-) sciencebloggers, illustrated by this one-liner

“ScienceBlogs has become Fox News for the religion-baiting, peak-oil crowd.”

Although I don’t appreciate the ranting-style of some of the blogs myself (the sub-“South Park” blasphemy style of PZ Myers, as Virginia puts it). I don’t think most Scienceblogs deserve to be labelled as “preoccupied with trivia, name-calling and saber rattling”.
See balanced responses at: NeurodojoNeuron Culture & Neuroanthropology (anything with neuro– makes sense, I guess).
Want to understand more about ScienceBlogs and why it was such a terrific community, then read Bora Z’s (rather long) ScienceBlog farewell post.

Oh.. and there is yet another new science blogging platform: http://www.labspaces.net/, that has evolved from a science news aggregator . It looks slick.

Social Media

Speaking about Twitter, did you know that  Twitter reached its 20 billionth tweet over the weekend, a milestone that came just a few months after hitting the 10 billion tweet mark!? (read more in the Guardian)

Well and if you have no idea WHAT THE FUCK IS MY SOCIAL MEDIA “STRATEGY”? you might click the link to get some (new) ideas. You probably need to refresh the site a couple of times to find the right answer.

First-year medical school and master’s of medicine students of Stanford University will receive an i-pad at the start of the year. The extremely tech-savvy Students do appreciate the gift:

“Especially in medicine, we’re using so many different resources, including all the syllabuses and slides. I’m able to pull them up and search them whenever I need to. It’s a fantastic idea.”

Good news for Facebook friends: VoIP giant Vonage has just introduced a new iPhone, iPod touch and Android app that allows users to call their Facebook friends for free (Mashable).

It was a shock – or wasn’t it – that Google pulled the plug on Google Wave (RRW), after being available to the general public for only 78 days?  The unparalleled tool that “could change the web”, but was too complex to be understood. Here are some thoughts why Google wave failed.  Since much of the Code is open source, ambitious developers may pick up where Google left.

Votes down for the social media site Digg.com: an undercover investigation has exposed that a group of influential conservative members were involved in censorship, deliberately trying to ban progressives, by “burying them” (voting down), which effectively means these progressives don’t get enough “digs” to reach the front page where most users spend their time.

Votes up for Healthcare Social Media Europe (#HCSMEU), which just celebrated its first birthday.

Miscellanous

A very strange move: a journal has changed a previously stated conclusion of a previously published paper after a Reuters Health story about serious shortcomings in the report. Read more about it at Gary Schwitzer’s HealthNewsReview Blog.

Finally for the EBM-addicts among us: The Center of Evidence Based Medicine released a new (downloadable) Levels of Evidence Table. At the CEBM-blog they stress that hierarchies of evidence have been somewhat inflexibly used, but are essentially a heuristic, or short-cut to finding the likely best evidence. At first sight the new Table looks simpler, and more easy to use.

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The Library of the University of Amsterdam goes… DigiZine with UvaLink. Beep Beep.

3 08 2010

Yesterday I went to the Facebook page of Alice Doek,  head of information services at Library of the University of Amsterdam (UBA), to wish her a happy birthday. As an organizer of the UBA-SPOETNIK course on NEW Internet communication methods for librarians, Alice inspired the start of this blog.

At her Facebook page I read about the latest Web 2.0 initiative of the UBA, Alice contributed to: UvA-link.
UvA-link is a magazine about the University Library (UB) and the Central Computer Service (IC) of the University of Amsterdam (UvA) with videos, moving images, sounds and other special effects: in other words a DigiZine.

Such a DigiZine is indescribable. So please have a look yourself. And don’t forget to click on the links or signs like at the start of a chapter!

The DigiZine is literally an eye-catcher: it starts with an eye which apparently looks at turning pages, it continues with a conversation between directors of the IC and UB about the future of information – they seem to step right out of the digital magazine-, a moving collage about web lectures, etcetera.

UVA-link is a smart piece of work and probably a good tool to reach library users and draw their attention to existing services. Well done!
I enjoyed reading it, although care must be taken not to overdo it: the e-part must be functional, else it can become annoying. Like the car that keeps on beeping on the page introducing OTOO*(Online toepassingen voor onderzoek en onderwijs), even after following a link.
It does remind me of the toys my girls used to have, with colorful buttons that produced mechanical sounds when pressed upon (and it seems that toddlers just can’t get enough of it) ….. Scientists, even students, are beyond that stage…
(*propably OTOO is derived from the Dutch word for car: AUTO, which is pronounced as OTOO by kids)

By the way, the OTOO-page is another new initiative of the UBA. It is a (Dutch) instruction on social media and its use for education and academia. It mostly consists of text with many links to other pages or videos. Really useful.
IMHO, however, it needs to be jazzed up to become more attractive for beginners, that have no idea about the possibilities of social media. Perhaps this OTOO-page needs to be wrapped up with a bit of DigiZine? Just suggesting….

In short,
UvA-link  is a DigiZine about the University Library and the Central Computer Service for staff and students of the University of Amsterdam (UvA). UvA-link will appear four times a year. You can subscribe (only by email) via the top right button in the magazine.

Even non Dutch-speaking people might enjoy taking a look. Perhaps it might inspire to make a similar DigiZine for your library, company or whatever purpose.

Sources

Related:





Silly Sunday #29 World Cup 2010-Twitter Reports of England’s Loss.

27 06 2010

The World Cup Soccer 2010 started 2 weeks ago. For now I only follow the Dutch team live. But indirectly I follow many other matches via Twitter. It is very entertaining, especially if things go awry, like the way the English were crushed by the Germans today (1:4). This was partly due to the referee who ruled out a legitimate goal by Frank Lampard when it was still 1 : 1.

Below are some of the tweets in my timeline. I especially like @precordialthump’s comparison of the English knock-out with apoptosis.

@Precordialthump opens with the best Faulty Tower fragment: “Don’t mention the War”. I can’t resist to show the fragment here.

And don’t miss the pic: “It wasn’t a goal” (via nutrigenomics)

  1. Maria Wolters
    mariawolters PHEW! #ger AND #gha are through! Go Ghana, go Africa! Now on to #ger / #eng. Mwahahaha …. #fb
  2. precordialthump
  3. precordialthump
    precordialthump Oh my god!!!! Come on England – 1966 in reverse!!!
  4. Sally Church
    MaverickNY @SallyWalker exactly kind of gobsmacked. If they ditch all the bad refs there won’t be any left for the final tho
  5. Maria Wolters
    mariawolters at least #eng will be spared the excruciating penalty shootout this time #brightside #schlaaaaand #fb
  6. Richard Herring
    Herring1967 I blame our 12th invisible player. Everyone keeps passing to him and then he fucks it up.
  7. Theodor Adorno
    TW_Adorno Your team qualified with ease under a Labour Govt and have struggled in every game under the Conservatives. How could this be?
  8. Stephanie Merritt
    thestephmerritt Is this happening because they’ve cut the defence budget? #ididafootballjoke
  9. precordialthump
    precordialthump The England team’s performance turned out to be the World Cup football equivalent of apoptosis… well done, Germany.
  10. Sally Church
    MaverickNY @whydotpharma not sure which was worse: refereeing, #eng or american tv commentary. Probably the last one was most clueless.
  11. jdc 325
    jdc325 Watched the England game with my Dad. My summary: what a shit waste of time. I could have gone for a walk or read a book.
  12. Nutrigenomics
    nutrigenomics Ha RT @biomatushiq: [pretty fast] ROFL RT @sotak: It wasn’t a goal! [pic] http://bit.ly/aHon2g #worldcup #eng #ger
  13. Daft-bint
    TheMarydoll Just been announced that the england team are flying back to glasgow airport so they can get a hero’s welcome.
  14. Laika (Jacqueline)
    laikas RT @BrettAwesome: Breaking News: England have a new coach. It takes them to the airport in 15 minutes.
  15. Maria Wolters

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Will Nano-Publications & Triplets Replace The Classic Journal Articles?

23 06 2010

ResearchBlogging.org“Libraries and journals articles as we know them will cease to exists” said Barend Mons at the symposium in honor of our Library 25th Anniversary (June 3rd). “Possibly we will have another kind of party in another 25 years”…. he continued, grinning.

What he had to say the next half hour intrigued me. And although I had no pen with me (it was our party, remember), I thought it was interesting enough to devote a post to it.

I’m basing this post not only on my memory (we had a lot of Italian wine at the buffet), but on an article Mons referred to [1], a Dutch newspaper article [2]), other articles [3-6] and Powerpoints [7-9] on the topic.

This is a field I know little about, so I will try to keep it simple (also for my sake).

Mons started by touching on a problem that is very familiar to doctors, scientists and librarians: information overload by a growing web of linked data.  He showed a picture that looked like the one at the right (though I’m sure those are Twitter Networks).

As he said elsewhere [3]:

(..) the feeling that we are drowning in information is widespread (..) we often feel that we have no satisfactory mechanisms in place to make sense of the data generated at such a daunting speed. Some pharmaceutical companies are apparently seriously considering refraining from performing any further genome-wide association studies (… whole genome association –…) as the world is likely to produce many more data than these companies will ever be able to analyze with currently available methods .

With the current search engines we have to do a lot of digging to get the answers [8]. Computers are central to this digging, because there is no way people can stay updated, even in their own field.

However,  computers can’t deal with the current web and the scientific  information as produced in the classic articles (even the electronic versions), because of the following reasons:

  1. Homonyms. Words that sound or are the same but have a different meaning. Acronyms are notorious in this respect. Barend gave PSA as an example, but, without realizing it, he used a better example: PPI. This means Protein Pump Inhibitor to me, but apparently Protein Protein Interactions to him.
  2. Redundancy. To keep journal articles readable we often use different words to denote the same. These do not add to the real new findings in a paper. In fact the majority of digital information is duplicated repeatedly. For example “Mosquitoes transfer malaria”, is a factual statement repeated in many consecutive papers on the subject.
  3. The connection between words is not immediately clear (for a computer). For instance, anti-TNF inhibitors can be used to treat skin disorders, but the same drugs can also cause it.
  4. Data are not structured beforehand.
  5. Weight: some “facts” are “harder” than others.
  6. Not all data are available or accessible. Many data are either not published (e.g. negative studies), not freely available or not easy to find.  Some portals (GoPubmed, NCBI) provide structural information (fields, including keywords), but do not enable searching full text.
  7. Data are spread. Data are kept in “data silos” not meant for sharing [8](ppt2). One would like to simultaneously query 1000 databases, but this would require semantic web standards for publishing, sharing and querying knowledge from diverse sources…..

In a nutshell, the problem is as Barend put it: “Why bury data first and then mine it again?” [9]

Homonyms, redundancy and connection can be tackled, at least in the field Barend is working in (bioinformatics).

Different terms denoting the same concept (i.e. synonyms) can be mapped to a single concept identifier (i.e. a list of synonyms), whereas identical terms used to indicate different concepts (i.e. homonyms) can be resolved by a disambiguation algorithm.

The shortest meaningful sentence is a triplet: a combination of subject, predicate and object. A triplet indicates the connection and direction.  “Mosquitoes cause/transfer malaria”  is such a triplet, where mosquitoes and malaria are concepts. In the field of proteins: “UNIPROT 05067 is a protein” is a triplet (where UNIPROT 05067 and protein are concepts), as are: “UNIprotein 05067 is located in the membrane” and “UNIprotein 0506 interacts with UNIprotein 0506″[8].  Since these triplets  (statements)  derive from different databases, consistent naming and availability of  information is crucial to find them. Barend and colleagues are the people behind Wikiproteins, an open, collaborative wiki  focusing on proteins and their role in biology and medicine [4-6].

Concepts and triplets are widely accepted in the world of bio-informatics. To have an idea what this means for searching, see the search engine Quertle, which allows semantic search of PubMed & full-text biomedical literature, automatic extraction of key concepts; Searching for ESR1 $BiologicalProcess will search abstracts mentioning all kind of processes where ESR1 (aka ERα, ERalpha, EStrogen Receptor 1) are involved. The search can be refined by choosing ‘narrower terms’ like “proliferation” or “transcription”.

The new aspects is that Mons wants to turn those triplets into (what he calls) nano-publications. Because not every statement is as ‘hard’, nano-publications are weighted by assigning numbers from 0 (uncertain) to 1 (very certain). The nano-publication “mosquitoes transfer malaria” will get a number approaching 1.

Such nano-publications offer little shading and possibility for interpretation and discussion. Mons does not propose to entirely replace traditional articles by nano-publications. Quote [3]:

While arguing that research results should be available in the form of nano-publications, are emphatically not saying that traditional, classical papers should not be published any longer. But their role is now chiefly for the official record, the “minutes of science” , and not so much as the principle medium for the exchange of scientific results. That exchange, which increasingly needs the assistance of computers to be done properly and comprehensively, is best done with machine-readable, semantically consistent nano-publications.

According to Mons, authors and their funders should start requesting and expecting the papers that they have written and funded to be semantically coded when published, preferably by the publisher and otherwise by libraries: the technology exists to provide Web browsers with the functionality for users to identify nano-publications, and annotate them.

Like the wikiprotein-wiki, nano-publications will be entirely open access. It will suffice to properly cite the original finding/publication.

In addition there is a new kind of “peer review”. An expert network is set up to immediately assess a twittered nano-publication when it comes out, so that  the publication is assessed by perhaps 1000 experts instead of 2 or 3 reviewers.

On a small-scale, this is already happening. Nano-publications are send as tweets to people like Gert Jan van Ommen (past president of HUGO and co-author of 5 of my publications (or v.v.)) who then gives a red (don’t believe) or a green light (believe) via one click on his blackberry.

As  Mons put it, it looks like a subjective event, quite similar to “dislike” and “like” in social media platforms like Facebook.

Barend often referred to a PLOS ONE paper by van Haagen et al [1], showing the superiority of the concept-profile based approach not only in detecting explicitly described PPI’s, but also in inferring new PPI’s.

[You can skip the part below if you’re not interested in details of this paper]

Van Haagen et al first established a set of a set of 61,807 known human PPIs and of many more probable Non-Interacting Protein Pairs (NIPPs) from online human-curated databases (and NIPPs also from the IntAct database).

For the concept-based approach they used the concept-recognition software Peregrine, which includes synonyms and spelling variations  of concepts and uses simple heuristics to resolve homonyms.

This concept-profile based approach was compared with several other approaches, all depending on co-occurrence (of words or concepts):

  • Word-based direct relation. This approach uses direct PubMed queries (words) to detect if proteins co-occur in the same abstract (thus the names of two proteins are combined with the boolean ‘AND’). This is the simplest approach and represents how biologists might use PubMed to search for information.
  • Concept-based direct relation (CDR). This approach uses concept-recognition software to find PPIs, taking synonyms into account, and resolving homonyms. Here two concepts (h.l. two proteins) are detected if they co-occur in the same abstract.
  • STRING. The STRING database contains a text mining score which is based on direct co-occurrences in literature.

The results show that, using concept profiles, 43% of the known PPIs were detected, with a specificity of 99%, and 66% of all known PPIs with a specificity of 95%. In contrast, the direct relations methods and STRING show much lower scores:

Word-based CDR Concept profiles STRING
Sensitivity at spec = 99% 28% 37% 43% 39%
Sensitivity at spec = 95% 33% 41% 66% 41%
Area under Curve 0.62 0.69 0.90 0.69

These findings suggested that not all proteins with high similarity scores are known to interact but may be related in another way, e.g.they could be involved in the same pathway or be part of the same protein complex, but do not physically interact. Indeed concept-based profiling was superior in predicting relationships between proteins potentially present in the same complex or pathway (thus A-C inferred from concurrence protein pairs A-B and B-C).

Since there is often a substantial time lag between the first publication of a finding, and the time the PPI is entered in a database, a retrospective study was performed to examine how many of the PPIs that would have been predicted by the different methods in 2005 were confirmed in 2007. Indeed, using concept profiles, PPIs could be efficiently predicted before they enter PPI databases and before their interaction was explicitly described in the literature.

The practical value of the method for discovery of novel PPIs is illustrated by the experimental confirmation of the inferred physical interaction between CAPN3 and PARVB, which was based on frequent co-occurrence of both proteins with concepts like Z-disc, dysferlin, and alpha-actinin. The relationships between proteins predicted are broader than PPIs, and include proteins in the same complex or pathway. Dependent on the type of relationships deemed useful, the precision of the method can be as high as 90%.

In line with their open access policy, they have made the full set of predicted interactions available in a downloadable matrix and through the webtool Nermal, which lists the most likely interaction partners for a given protein.

According to Mons, this framework will be a very rich source for new discoveries, as it will enable scientists to prioritize potential interaction partners for further testing.

Barend Mons started with the statement that nano-publications will replace the classic articles (and the need for libraries). However, things are never as black as they seem.
Mons showed that a nano-publication is basically a “peer-reviewed, openly available” triplet. Triplets can be effectively retrieved ànd inferred from available databases/papers using a
concept-based approach.
Nevertheless, effectivity needs to be enhanced by semantically coding triplets when published.

What will this mean for clinical medicine? Bioinformatics is quite another discipline, with better structured and more straightforward data (interaction, identity, place). Interestingly, Mons and van Haage plan to do further studies, in which they will evaluate whether the use of concept profiles can also be applied in the prediction of other types of relations, for instance between drugs or genes and diseases. The future will tell whether the above-mentioned approach is also useful in clinical medicine.

Implementation of the following (implicit) recommendations would be advisable, independent of the possible success of nano-publications:

  • Less emphasis on “publish or perish” (thus more on the data themselves, whether positive, negative, trendy or not)
  • Better structured data, partly by structuring articles. This has already improved over the years by introducing structured abstracts, availability of extra material (appendices, data) online and by guidelines, such as STARD (The Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy)
  • Open Access
  • Availability of full text
  • Availability of raw data

One might argue that disclosing data is unlikely when pharma is involved. It is very hopeful therefore, that a group of major pharmaceutical companies have announced that they will share pooled data from failed clinical trials in an attempt to figure out what is going wrong in the studies and what can be done to improve drug development (10).

Unfortunately I don’t dispose of Mons presentation. Therefore two other presentations about triplets, concepts and the semantic web.

&

References

  1. van Haagen HH, ‘t Hoen PA, Botelho Bovo A, de Morrée A, van Mulligen EM, Chichester C, Kors JA, den Dunnen JT, van Ommen GJ, van der Maarel SM, Kern VM, Mons B, & Schuemie MJ (2009). Novel protein-protein interactions inferred from literature context. PloS one, 4 (11) PMID: 19924298
  2. Twitteren voor de wetenschap, Maartje Bakker, Volskrant (2010-06-05) (Twittering for Science)
  3. Barend Mons and Jan Velterop (?) Nano-Publication in the e-science era (Concept Web Alliance, Netherlands BioInformatics Centre, Leiden University Medical Center.) http://www.nbic.nl/uploads/media/Nano-Publication_BarendMons-JanVelterop.pdf, assessed June 20th, 2010.
  4. Mons, B., Ashburner, M., Chichester, C., van Mulligen, E., Weeber, M., den Dunnen, J., van Ommen, G., Musen, M., Cockerill, M., Hermjakob, H., Mons, A., Packer, A., Pacheco, R., Lewis, S., Berkeley, A., Melton, W., Barris, N., Wales, J., Meijssen, G., Moeller, E., Roes, P., Borner, K., & Bairoch, A. (2008). Calling on a million minds for community annotation in WikiProteins Genome Biology, 9 (5) DOI: 10.1186/gb-2008-9-5-r89
  5. Science Daily (2008/05/08) Large-Scale Community Protein Annotation — WikiProteins
  6. Boing Boing: (2008/05/28) WikiProteins: a collaborative space for biologists to annotate proteins
  7. (ppt1) SWAT4LS 2009Semantic Web Applications and Tools for Life Sciences http://www.swat4ls.org/
    Amsterdam, Science Park, Friday, 20th of November 2009
  8. (ppt2) Michel Dumontier: triples for the people scientists liberating biological knowledge with the semantic web
  9. (ppt3, only slide shown): Bibliography 2.0: A citeulike case study from the Wellcome Trust Genome Campus – by Duncan Hill (EMBL-EBI)
  10. WSJ (2010/06/11) Drug Makers Will Share Data From Failed Alzheimer’s Trials