Presentation at the #NVB09: “Help, the doctor is drowning”

16 11 2009

15-11-2009 23-24-33 nvb congressenLast week I was invited to speak at the NVB-congress, the Dutch society for librarians and information specialists. I replaced Josje Calff in the session “the professional”, chaired by Bram Donkers of the magazine InformatieProfessional. Other sessions were: “the client”, “the technique” and “the connection”. (see program)

It was a very successful meeting, with Andrew Keen and Bas Haring in the plenary session. I understand from tweets and blogposts that @eppovannispen en @lykle who were in parallel sessions were especially interesting.
Some of the (Dutch) blogposts (Not about my presentation….pfew) are:

I promised to upload my presentation to Slideshare. And here it is.

Some slides are different from the original. First, Slideshare doesn’t allow animation, (so slides have to be added to get a similar effect), second I realized later that the article and search I showed in Ede were not yet published, so I put “top secret” in front of it.

The title refers to a Dutch book and film: “Help de dokter verzuipt” (“Help the doctor is drowning”).

Slides 2-4: NVB-tracks; why I couldn’t discuss “the professional” without explaining the changes with which the medical profession is confronted.

Slides 5-8: Clients of a medical librarian (dependent on where he/she works).

Slides 9-38: Changes to the medical profession (less time, opinion-based medicine gradually replaced by evidence based medicine, information overload, many sources, information literacy)

Slides 39-66: How medical librarians can help (‘electronic’ collection accessible from home, study landscape for medical students, less emphasis on books, up to date with alerts (email, RSS, netvibes), portals (i.e. for evidence based searching), education (i.e. courses, computer workshops, e-learning), active participation in curriculum, helping with searches or performing them).

Slides 67-68: Summary (Potential)

Slide 69: Barriers/Risks: Money, support (management, contact persons at the departments/in the curriculum), doctors like to do it theirselves (it looks easy), you have to find a way to reach them, training medical information specialists.

Slides 70-73 Summary & Credits

Here are some tweets related to this presentation.

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BlogWorld Expo [SOTB] & The Status of the Medical Blogosphere

25 10 2009

During my stay in Singapore from October 9th-16th there were 2 other great events, one of them  being the Blogworld Expo, the  World largest Conference on Blogging in the Las Vegas Convention Center. As a matter of fact, I would never have the opportunity to go to such a place, because I’m blogging in my spare time and although it has many spin-offs for my work, I would never have the resources and the time to go there. So, it was with a little jealousy and envy that I followed all those cheerful tweets from my colleague medbloggers. They apparently had a lot to talk about, -also outside the context of the meeting. I even understood that Bongi came all the way from South Africa.  And I can’t say the video below eases the pain 😉 :

Vodpod videos no longer available.

more about “Scenes from Blog World Expo 2009 and …“, posted with vodpod
Image of Kim McAllister from Facebook
Image of Kim McAllister

It was the first time during the Blogworld Expo there was a medblogging-track. Thanks to the effort of Kim McAllister of Emergiblog. She posted a kind of a *rant* that there was nothing for medbloggers at two events. Seeing this, one organizer of Blogworld Expo commented: we have a place for you if you want to come. Johnson & Johnson were willing to sponsor, and MedPage Today offered an additional sponsorship. Below is an interview with Kim as well as with another well known blogging nurse, Gina Rybolt of Codeblog. In this interview “the conversation turns to why they blog, how they manage to do it without compromising their patient’s privacy and how they wish marketers and pharma brands would approach them.”

Rohit Bhargava who interviewed both nurses also interviewed the famous medical blogger Kevin Pho of KevinMD about why he blogs, what results he has seen and the future of the medical blogosphere the future of Medical Blogging. He makes clear why it is important for doctors to blog. However, there is one major obstacle for busy physicians, namely: TIME!

Want more information an/or pictures on the medblog-part of the conference, please see:

The opening keynote of the Blogworld Expo was delivered by Richard Jalichandra, CEO of Technorati, showing some highlights from their annual study following the growth and trends in the annual State of the Blogosphere. The report was released over five days. (See Techcruch for presentation and short explanation ; the entire report is available at Technorati)

What I found most interesting:

  • In Social Media the content is the conversation.
  • There is a rising class of “professional” bloggers.
  • But still Hobbyists represent 76% of all bloggers
    (I have some problems with the division in ‘professional bloggers’ and ‘hobbyist’ though, since professional bloggers are those regarded as “earning some money” and hobbyists are regarded as those that don’t. I think there should at least be 3 main groups: those blogging as a profession (earn money), those blogging as an expert (mostly) in their free time (professionally) and those writing about their hobbies, children etc (hobbyists).
  • The hobbyists blog for fun and to express themselves
  • 15% is part time professional, they blog to supplement their income and to share their expertise
  • 9% is self-employed, 4% is corporate (see Figure below)
  • Of the professional bloggers 2 thirds are male, 16% are 18-44, are more effluent and educated than the general population and the hobbyist bloggers (hmmm that also pleads against medbloggers not belonging to this group)
  • 73% of all bloggers use Twitter vs 14% of the general population (but nr 1 reason is to promote their blog)
  • 26% of bloggers who also use Twitter say that the service has eaten into the time they spend updating their traditional blogs – though 65% say it has had no effect.
  • on average only .83% of the page views come from Twitter referrals.
  • Advise to succeed: be passionate.
  • Bloggers believe that politics (57%) and technology/business (44%-20%) are among the fields most impacted by the blogosphere, and that they will continue to be transformed by the blogosphere going forward. Health was only mentioned by 5%.

I wonder where/whether Science/Health/Medbloggers fit in? Are they underrepresented in the study? Or do they belong to a minority anyway? See here a discussion on Twitter (catched with QuoteURL)

sotb1 technorati 209

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#EAHIL2009 Web 2.0 and Health Information – Chris Mavergames

4 06 2009

2-6-2009 23-11-41 EAHIL 2009

I’m in Dublin to attend the EAHIL workshop 2009.
The EAHIL is the European Association for Health Information and Libraries.

The EAHIL -workshop 2009 really started Wednesday afternoon. Tuesday morning, as a foretaste of the official program I attended a Continuing Education Course, namely the Web 2.0 and Health Information course by Chris Mavergames.

Chris Mavergames is currently the Web Operation Manager/Information Architect for the Cochrane Collaboration. Before, he worked in the field of information and library science.

So Chris and I are really colleagues, but we didn’t realize until we “met” on Twitter.

On this hot day in June I was pleased that the workshop was held in the cool Berkeley Library of Trinity College.
They have chosen real good locations for this EAHIL workshop. Most presentations are in the Dublin Castle, another place at the Heart of the Irish History.

The workshop took approximately 3 hours and consisted of two presentations, followed by short Q&A’s and an open forum afterwards.

The presentations:

  • Web 2.0 and Health Information“,
  • A case study of the experiences of implementing and using these technologies in a large, non-profit organization (Cochrane Collaboration).

Eighteen people could attend. Each of us had a computer, which raised expectations that they were needed during the workshop. They were not, but they were handy anyway to look up things and to draft a post. And.. I could post this message on Twitter before Chris loaded a photo of his class on TwitPic.  LOL.

4-6-2009 9-46-55 chris is making a photo

10848362 class chriss mavergames

Web 2.0 versus web 1.0
Chris began with asking the audience how many people either have used ..or at least have heard of Facebook, LinkedIn or any other social networking service. And then he asked which tools were being used. Afterwards he admitted he had checked everyone’s presence on various social bookmarking sites. Hilarious.

To my surprise, quite a number of people were familiar with most of the web 2.0 services and sources. Indeed, weren’t librarians the first to embrace web 2.0?

I got the impression Twitter was the least well known/appreciated tools. Most people were either on Facebook or Linkedin, not on both. This presumably has to do with separation of professional and personal things.

Chris first explained the difference between Web 1.0 and Web 2.0: Web 1.0 is a one way interaction, static. Web 2.0 is: “more finding or receiving, less searching”. It has a dynamic aspect: there is more interaction, the possibility to ‘comment, subscribe, post, add, share or as Chris puts it: “Web 2.0 allows you to have information “pushed” at you vs. you having to “pull”.

Another characteristic of web 2.0 is that technology has become easier. It is now more about content.

As an example he showed the Cochrane website from 2004 (web 1.0) and the current website. The first was just a plain web site where you could search, browse and email, the second has social bookmarking tools and is more dynamic and active: you can add comments, post on websites etc.. In addition the Cochrane Collaboration is now on Twitter and Facebook and produces podcasts of a selection of systematic reviews.

Another example of web 2.0 interfaces are MyNCBI of PubMed (for saving your searches) and i-Google.

Social Networking services
These services allow you to create an online profile so that you can interact with others, share and integrate.

Examples are Facebook, LinkedIn and 2 Collab. What is used most, differs around the world. Linkedin is more a professional site, an “online resume” and Facebook is for more general stuff. “You’re mother is on facebook too, so..”. Most young people don’t realize what others can read. However, Facebook offers the possibility to select precisely who can see exactly what.

Twitter
Twitter is a microblogging system, that allows a 140 chracter message (tweet). At first, Chris wasn’t very much interested. He only knew Twitter through the automatic updates on Facebook, but “wasn’t really interested in a  friend in New York eating a scrambled egg.”

It is as easy to subscribe to one’s updates as it is to unsubscribe. Chris uses Tweetdeck to filter for keywords that are of interest. But as he showed me later, he uses the i-phone to easily catch what people (he follows) are tweeting.

Although Twitter was created as a social tool it is now much more than that. It creates a so called “ambient awareness” and as such it is a perfect example of “push” technology: you won‘t see every tweet, but you will l be ambiently aware of the conversation (of your “friends” or the subject you follow). Twitter is also very useful for getting a real fast answer to your question. This is how Chris learned the value of Twitter. He had a question at a meeting. Someone said: just put it on Twitter with the hashtag of the congress (an agreed upon keyword with #in front, like #EAHIL2009). He did it and within 3 minutes he got an answer. Twitter is also very useful for sharing and finding links.
There are many “Twitter apps” around. Just search Google for it.

For professional use within a company the twitter look-alike Yammer can be a useful alternative, because only people in the company are able to follow the updates.

My personal experience is also very positive. Twitter and other web 2.0 tools can work synergistically, dependent on your Twitter community and how you use it.

Social bookmarking:
Although librarians aren’t always very happy with user generated tagging, social bookmarking tools are and easy way of allowing users to share a collections of links.
Links used (directly or indirectly) for his presentation are available at del.icio.us/mavergames under the tag EAHIL.

Blogs, Wiki’s
A blog can give a good summary of interesting articles in a particular field. Chris began a blog 2 months ago (http://mavergames.net) about  a very specific subject he is involved in: Drupal. For him is it just an open notebook: a platform to share your ideas with others.
It is possible receiving updates via RSS (push).

Wiki’s are a very powerful knowledge gathering tool,  a way to collaboratively create a resource, based on the principle of “Crowd sourcing” (The Wisdom of Crowds).

Examples of the two are:

  1. https://laikaspoetnik.wordpress.com/ (this blog)
  2. http://scienceroll.com/ (of the Hungarian Medical Student Bertalan Mesko)
  3. http://www.medpedia.com/ (not yet fully developped medical wiki)
  4. http://twictionary.pbwiki.com/ (a fun wiki with the Twitter Vocabulary)
  5. cochrane.org/ideas
  6. http://mavergames.net (Chris’s blog on Drupal)

Subscription services: RSS
Via RSS Really Simple Syndication you can push information from a variety of sources:

  • Podcasts, for instance cochrane.org/podcasts
  • Saved searches, like in PubMed
  • News feeds cochrane.org/news
  • Updates to sites
  • Updates to collections of bookmarks
  • Updates to flickr photos
  • Etcetera

Platforms can vary from Google Reader, Yahoo, Bloglines, but you can also use i-Google or a specilized medical page where you can find links to all kinds of sources, like blogs, podcasts and journals. Perssonalized Medicine (http://www.webicina.com/rss_feeds/) is especially recommended.

Somebody from the audience added that Medworm is a good (and free) medical RSS feed provider as well. For an overview of several of such platforms, including Medworm, i-Google and www.webicina.com see an earlier post on this blog:  Perssonalized Medicine and its alternatives (2009-02-27).

A typical Web 2.0 scenario:

  1. Chris visits Laika’s MedlibLog and reads Cochrane PodCasts are available.
  2. He finds it interesting , goes to the Cochrane website and subscribes to the Cochrane podcasts with RSS.
  3. He want to share this finding with others, so he decides to tweet that Cochrane podcasts are available.
  4. He gets a response: Hé do you know the Cochrane is on Facebook, so he visits Facebook joins and posts the news on facebook again. And so on.

Not only did Chris give a nice overview of Web 2.0 tools, but there was ample opportunity for discussions and remarks.

The two most common questions were: [1] When can you find time for this? and [2] what can you do when the IT-departments don’t allow access to web 2.0 tools like YouTube, Facebook, RSS? It really seamed the main barrier for librarians from many countries to the use of web 2.0. Nevertheless, Chris engaging presentation seemed to encourage many people to try the tools that were new to them at home. Afterwards I only heard positive comments on this workshop.

The slidecasts of the two presentations are now online on http://www.slideshare.net/mavergames.

The slidecast I’ve reviewed is below.





#Sciblog – a bird-eye’s view from the camera

2 09 2008

Last Saturday I learned from @AJCann and @Jobadge (Twitter) that there was a Science Blogging Conference going on in London, that you could virtually attend.

Although I planned to do something else (banking for my mom, pick up my daughter from her overnight stay; Saturday is my-shopping-&-bodyshape-sauna- & blogging-if-I-have-some-spare-time-day), I decided to follow it. In the meantime I tried to blog about something else, which didn’t work.

I largely followed Cameron Neylon’s streamed video on Mogulus. It’s main value was the audio-stream, as well as the candid-camera function peeping at the audience from behind.

I came in late (back from banking) and unfortunately missed the Keynote lecture of Ben Goldacre from Badscience.

The next session didn’t do it for me, partly because the 3 blogging ladies ( Jenny Rohn, Grrl Scientist, Anna Kushnir) were almost inaudible and what they had to say about the bridging function of blogs between scientists and the general public (also figuratively) didn’t catch my ears. In the meantime the virtual attendents including, Fang (Mike Seyfang) from Australia, AJCann, some other guys and me, chatted in Cameron Neylon’s room.

In between I followed Twitter-messages having the hashtag #sciblog (see here). I was not familiar with hashtags, but it is a predefined tag you can add to you microblogging post to easily tract what is being said about a subject (even when you don’t actually follow the persons themselves, so as a spin off you can get acquainted with some real interesting people).

Example of a twitter message on #sciblog:

#sciblog matt woods: friendfeed encourages discussion and closes feedback loop 9 minutes ago from TwitKit

However, Hashtags is an opt-in service. You must follow @hashtags -and it has to follow you- for the service to index your tweets, so it took me some time to get it done (For more information, see this twitter wiki.) Althoug the procedure in itself was very effective, the twitter messages didn’t add much value for people already attending.

Another online backchannel, the Friendfeed room appeared more lively, but I soon stopped following the threads. Furthermore I ‘m so old-fashioned that I think speakers do deserve my attention while they’re talking (but perhaps that is because I’m not yet used to chatting at the back-scene). Checking my notes afterwards with the Friendfeed comments was useful however.

Next I followed Matt Wood’s introduction to microblogging and aggregation services and Breakout 6 “Communicating Primary Research Publicly” by Heather Etchevers (Human in Science), Jean-Claude Bradley (Useful Chemistry) and Bob O’Hara (Deep Thoughts and Silliness).

I found these presentations interesting, but tracking my notes back I couldn’t see where Matt ended and the others began.

During his lively presentation with a lot of gesturing, the heavy “sequencer” Matt Wood from “Green is Good” told us he had decided not to worry to be open and just send the message out to the public. You could use blogs to communicate your scientific findings, but blogposts do not handle versioning, although you can sometimes manipulate the post’s date (WordPress blog). Another tool is microblogging services. Twitter is more of a social platform, whereas Friendfeed is more apt for more information-exchange (no 140 character-limit). A new microblogging service is identi.ca. (see for instance this readwriteweb post)

Labnote books (and wiki’s) were a recurrent subject through the 4 presentations. They are very useful to blog primary research. People should write their motives, use it as a diary (writing down all details and circumstances), recording the results (videorecording, freehand sketches, figures, prints, text), followed by periodic summing up.

Why this is useful?

  • You don’t have to remember it (people tend to forget) (although some lab-scientists don’t like to take the notebook along to the bench)
  • Archive of ideas, (to share with people in the lab, collaborators or even ‘the world’
  • (If open) some results may be available direct outside the lab, which may be very useful for cooperation and exchange of thoughts or help (why did my blot fail?-how to proceed?)
  • It may help as a bridge to the public, i.e. by showing if public money is being spent well or for direct communication of your data to the public.
  • The info is verifiable if you link to the real data
  • Science is far more efficient this way and results are revealed instantly. Why wait till everything is distilled out? The scientist’s approach is as Hans Ricke quoted Richard Feyman from his Nobel Lecture 1966 (at Bob o’Hara ‘s blog) :

“We have a habit in writing articles published in scientific journals to make the work as finished as possible, to cover up all the tracks, to not worry about the blind alleys or describe how you had the wrong idea first, and so on. So there isn’t any place to publish, in a dignified manner,what you actually did in order to get to do the work.”

As Hans said blogs may fill that hole, because they are the place to publish this!

Major Pitfall may be that journals may not accept data reported on a wiki. And another that some people may run away with your ideas. By writing it all down you make it very easy on them. Still if everybody would become open…. For Science that would be a great good.

What I liked most of these presentations is the openness and the creativity of the presenters.
As a (medical) librarian and a scientist these thoughts came to my mind:

  • I’m a bit jealous that I worked as a scientist in the web 1.0 era. This way of approaching science looks very stimulating to me, but maybe that’s only a romantic look from the outside?
  • How do we as librarians step in? Can we play a facilitating role? Should these primary findings be aggregated and made available in a searchable way?
    We should at least keep more in pace with the new scientific developments and the way researchers exchange and find their information. It’s entirely different to what we are used to. (we= most librarians I know, including myself)
  • I wonder if such an approach could also be used in medicine and/or in EBM. Are wiki’s like this useful for CATs for instance? Question, PICO + domain, best study type, search, critical appraisal, summary, power point presentation, pdf-files, video of CAT etc??? link to video of casus perhaps?

To get an impression of the great features of such a wiki/open notebook, take a look at http://usefulchem.wikispaces.com/ (Jean Claude Bradley). You can also go to the Useful Chemistry blog and click at “UsefulChem wiki”. Note for instance the links to the notebooks of the individual scientists. Really impressive.

Below you also find the (short) presentation of Heather. Hope the others will follow soon and share their presentations

Vodpod videos no longer available.

more about “Sciblog2008 Etchevers“, posted with vodpod
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Nature science blogging conference

30 08 2008

There is official forum for Science Blogging in London, today. The event is organized by Nature Networks.

You can find the program and the attendees here.

AJCann of Science of the Invisible has summarized in this post how you can virtually follow this conference.

At this moment (saturday 11.45 am) you can follow the forum live here

HATTIP: Twitter : @AJCann, @Jobadge

———————————-

Vandaag is er een conferentie voor ‘wetenschapsbloggers’ in Londen.

het wordt georganiseerd door Nature Networks

Hier kunt u het programma bekijken.

Op dit moment (zaterdag 11.45 uur) kunt u het programma hier live volgen.

AJCann van Science of the Invisible heeft hier samengevat hoe u deze conferentie kunt volgen.

HATTIP: Twitter : @AJCann, @Jobadge





MLA 2008: connections (and Spoetnik)

22 05 2008

The annual meeting of the Medical Library Association (MLA) that took place this week in Chicago focused on the future of librarianship and (thus) on connections:

Only connect!…Only connect the prose and the passion… Live in fragments no longer…Only connect.”

—E. M. Forster, Howards End (1910)

Well connecting that’s what they do, the US-librarians. No off-season. In line with the theme of MLA’08 they keep on blogging and connecting even when at a meeting.

It seems like most tools we learned during the Spoetnik-course (weeks #1-#13) (see about and the Dutch Spoetnik-program ) were applied by the advanced medical-library-bloggers.

15 Bloggers were invited by mail (#1) to become “official conference bloggers” (#2) for MLA 2008, including Michelle Kraft, David Rothman and Eric Schnell. In addition there was at least one unofficial MLA-blogger.

Their posts were displayed on an official Wetpaint-Wiki (#9), whereas David Rothman pulled together an aggregated Yahoo Pipes feed (#3) of all the MLA postings using Feedburner. I took a subscription, but still have to screen it (way behind again).

Of course all bloggers already are del.ici.ous (#7), do their librarything (#5), stumble upon, digg it (#13) and LinkedIn (#10).

Some bloggers shared their agenda using google calendar (#8), or made some appointments by mail (#1) or chatting(#4) and there was also a MLA twitter + feed (#13, #3). Unfortunately there was far less twittering, tweetering and blogging (#13) and thus far less connections than planned, because according to the kraftylibrarian “there was no freaking network on which to be social..” (No wireless access). Bit stupid for a meeting on networks…… 😦

In addition there was a MLA-flickr-group (#6) , and some bloggers placed a you tube-(#13) or other video- or podcast (#11) on their blog. I will copy (share) one in the next post.

Interested in more: well (if you are a MLA-member?!) you can watch a live Video Webcast on the first plenary session on “Web 2.0 Tools for Librarians: Description, Demonstration, Discussion, and Debate”.

Alas I’m not, but several video’s, links and posts on the blogs mentioned above are informative as well -and freely available-. See for instance the blogs that I read (and consulted for this post):

Michelle Kraft – The Krafty Librarian

David Rothman – davidrothman.net

Eric Schnell – The Medium is the Message

tunaiskewl? ratcatcher? – omg tuna is kewl