National Library Week

12 04 2011

It is National Library Week! Did you know that?

To be honest I didn’t.

Today, Tuesday, is even National Library Workers Day — a time to thank librarians and the rest of the library staff (LA-Times).

I didn’t know that either, until I received a tweet from @doc_emer which was retweeted by doctor_V (see Fig).

Now I know.

Thank you Dr. Emer and Bryan Vartabedian (Doctor V). You made my day!

*********************************

Added:

 

@amcunningham (AnneMarie Cunningham) tweeted:
Since it’s national library week, thought I’d say thanks to all the great librarians on this list:) http://bit.ly/gkzKZm

 

 

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An Introduction to the Library for Graduate Students

6 11 2010

Below is a presentation I gave at the “World of Science”. This is a 3-day course for graduate students that aims to provide them the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for scientific research, and to prepare them for their thesis at our hospital, the AMC.

The 3-day program comprises a series of presentations on aspects of medical and biomedical research. These include the position of the pharmaceutical industry, the role of scientific journals, the ethical and legal framework of medical research, and the organization and funding of scientific research in the Netherlands. There is also an introduction to the scientific strategy of the AMC, presented by the Dean of the Faculty of Medicine.

Furthermore there are group discussions, workshops, and individual assignments.

The course is held outside the AMC. It provides a unique opportunity for a closer and more personal meeting with each other and with leading AMC scientists, to discuss such matters as the choices they made in their careers.

I had 15 minutes (actually 20 minutes) to tell something about the library. (It used to be 30 min. but wasn’t received so well). That is too short to explain searching to them. Furthermore that is dealt with in our courses, so why give it all away?

I choose to show them how the library could serve them, in an interactive and loose way.

First I asked them how they saw the library. Many, if not all, used our website. Pfff, that was a relieve!

I spend most time talking about searching, showing  examples of searches that failed. Which is the best way to show them they might need some extra education in this respect.

The atmosphere was very good & informal, there were many questions and it was sometimes quite hilarious, not only because of the presentation itself, but because I almost managed to ruin the screen (fell against it) and because I walked away with the microphone.

I had the opportunity to listen to the next speaker too, a young scientist who recently finished his thesis. His talk was great to listen to. He talked about his experience (which was not really representative imho, because it was quite a success story) and he gave the would-be PhD’s 10 handy tips. All in a very entertaining way.

But for now, here is my presentation.





Medical Information Matters: Call for Submissions

6 11 2010

I would like to remind you that it is almost the first Saturday of the Month and thus submission time for Medical Information Matters, the former MedLibs round.

Medical Information Matters is a monthly compilation of the “best blog post in the field of medical information”, hosted by a different blogger each time. The blogger who will host the upcoming edition is Dean Giustini.

I am sure that every librarian, and many doctors, know Dean. As a starting blogging librarian, I knew 2  international librarian bloggers: Dean Giustini and Krafty Librarian (make that 3, I forgot to mention David Rothman*) . I looked up to them and they did (and do) inspire me.
It is nice that blogging and Social Media can make distances shorter, literally and figuratively…

As far as I know, Dean has no theme for this round. But you can always submit any good quality post about medical information to the blog carnival. Whether you are a librarian, a doctor, a nurse, a patient and/or a scientist and whether your post is on searching, reference management, reliability of information, gaps in information, evidence, social media or education ( to name a few).
You can submit your own post or a good post of someone else, as long as it is in English.

So if that isn’t easy….

Please submit the URL/permalink of your post at:
http://blogcarnival.com/bc/submit_6092.html

If everything goes according to plan, you can read the Medical Information Matters 2.9 at the blog of Dean Giustini next Tuesday.

 

* Thanks to @DrVes via Twitter. Social Media is sooo powerful!





May I Introduce to you: a New Name for the MedLibs Round….

30 09 2010

A couple of weeks or even months ago I asked you to vote for a new name for the MedLibs Round, a blog carnival about medical information.

The decision was clear.

Hurray!

And the winner is……

Drumroll….

Medical Information Matters!

…………………

I’m very pleased with the results because the name reflects that the blog carnival is about medical information and is not purely a carnival for medical librarians.

I hope that Robin of Survive the Journey is still willing and able to make the logo for Medical Information Matters.

Well it will not be long for Medical Information Matters will be “inaugurated”.
We won’t restart the counting. So it will be Medical Information Matters 2.8

There are only a few days left from submitting.
Daniel Hooker at Danielhooker.com: Health libraries, Medicine and the Web is eagerly awaiting your submissions.

You can submit the URL of your post HERE at the Blog Carnival.

Daniel at his call for submissions post:

I’d love to see posts on new things you’re trying out this year: new projects, teaching sessions, innovative services. Maybe it’s something tried and true that you’d like to reflect on. And this goes for anyone starting out fresh this term, not just librarians! We should all be brimming with enthusiasm; the doldrums of winter have yet to set in. If you can find the time to reflect and even just write up your busy workday, I’ll do my best to weave them all together. I, for one, hope to describe some of the projects that I’m involved with at my new workplace. But remember, this “theme” is only a suggestion, we’d be happy to see any contributions that you think would be of interest.

Educators, librarians, doctors or scientists please remember: your submission matters…. No interesting blog carnival without your contribution. I’m looking forward to the next MedLibs round, the first Medical Information Matters Edition (it is a mouth full isn’t it?)

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MedLib’s Round is up at DigiCMB

11 09 2010

This months MedLib’s Round is up at DigiCMB the blog of Guus van den Brekel.

The title is Emerging Technology in Medical and Health Information.

Unfortunately there were few submissions. By adding a lot of useful information and links himself, Guus succeeded in composing a rich edition on the topic. You can read it all here

His intention was that colleagues specifically posted on the theme ànd commented on his Continuing Education Course (CEC) at EAHIL2010. You can still do the latter.
Here is the public course:
http://www.netvibes.com/emergingtechnologiesinlibraries
.

Considering the small niche of the MedLibs Round, and the fact that this round is not purely meant for medical librarians alone, I wouldn’t recommend strict themes. It would be perfect if participants to the round would write a post specifically for the round on a topic specifically fitting the theme, but in reality that is seldom done.

I had hoped that it would go as easy as the weekly Grand Rounds, where people automatically start submitting and keep an eye themselves on who is hosting the rounds, but that is not the case. But perhaps this is a bit naïve.

Still it is a good round with lot of quality submissions and excellent hosts. So we surely will continue, although likely under a new name  (soon to be announced)

The next 3 hosts are cream of the crop again:

You can already start submitting the permalink of your post HERE at the Blog Carnival.

The next submission deadline is October the 3rd.





Ten Years of PubMed Central: a Good Thing that’s Only Going to Get Better.

26 05 2010

PubMed Central (PMC) is a free digital archive of biomedical and life sciences journal literature at the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), developed and managed by NIH’s National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) in the National Library of Medicine (NLM) (see PMC overview).
PMC is a central repository for biomedical peer reviewed literature in the same way as NCBI’s GenBank is the public archive of DNA sequences. The idea behind it “that giving all users free access to the material in PubMed Central is the best way to ensure the durability and utility of the electronical archive as technology changes over time and to integrate the literature with other information resources at NLM”.
Many journals are already involved, although most of them adhere to restrictions (i.e. availability after 1 year). For list see http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/journals/

PMC, the brain child of Harold Varmus, once the Director of the National Institutes of Health, celebrated its 10 year anniversary earlier this year.

For this occasion Dr. Lipman, Director of the NCBI, gave an overview of past and future plans for the NIH’s archive of biomedical research articles. See videotape of the Columbia University Libraries below:

Vodpod videos no longer available.

more about “Ten Years of PubMed Central | Scholar…“, posted with vodpod

The main points raised by David Lipman (appr. time given if you want to learn more about it; the text below is not a transcription, but a summary in my own words):

PAST/PRESENT

  • >7:00. BiomedCental (taken over by Spinger) and PLoS ONE show that Open Access can be a sustaining way in Publishing Science.
  • 13:23 Publisher keeps the copyright. He may stop depositing but the content already deposited remains in PMC.
  • 13:50 PMC is also an obligatory repository for author manuscripts under various funding agencies mandates, like the NIH and the UK welcome trust.
  • 14:31 One of the ideas from the beginning was to crosslink the literature with the underlying molecular and other databases. For instance NCBI is capable of mining out the information in the archived text and connecting it to the compound and the protein structure database.
  • 16:50 There is a back issue digitization for the journals that are participating, enabling to find research that you wouldn’t have easily found otherwise.
  • PMC has become international (not restricted to USA)
  • The PMC archive becomes more useful if it becomes more comprehensive
  • Before PMC you could do a Google Scholar search and find a paper in PubMed, that appeared funded by NIH, but then you had to pay $30 for it in order to get it. That’s hard to explain to the taxpayers (Lipman had a hard time explaining it to his dad who was looking for medical information online). This was the impetus for making the results of NIH-sponsored results freely available.

PRESENT/FUTURE

  • 23:00 Discovery initiative: is the use of tracking tools to find out which changes to the website work for users and which don’t. Thus modifications should lead to alterations in users behavior (statistics is easy with millions of users). Discovery initiative led to development and improvement of sensors, like sensors for disease names, drug names, genes and citations. What is being measured is if people click through (if it isn’t interesting, they usually don’t) and how quickly they find results. Motto: train the machine, not the users.
  • 30:37 We changed the looks of PMC. Planning to make a better presentation on the i-phone and on broad monitors.
  • 31:40. There are almost 2 million articles in PubMed Central, 585 journals fully participate in PMC
  • 32.30 It takes very long to publish a paper, even in Open Access papers. Therefore a lot of people are not publishing little discoveries, which are not important enough to put a lot of time in. Publishing should be almost as easy as writing a blog, but with peer review. This requires a new type of journal, with peer review, but with instant feedback from readers and reviewers and rapid response to comments. The Google Knol authoring system offers a fast and simple authoring system where authors (with a Google profile) can collaborate and compose the article on the server. Uploading of documents and figures is easy, the article updates are simple and fast, there is a simple workflow for moderators. After the paper is accepted you press a button, the paper is immediately available and the next day PMC automatically gets the XML content. There is also a simple Reference Manager included to paste citations.
  • Principle: How you can start a journal with this system (see Figure). Till now: 60 articles in PLOS Currents Influenza. There are also plans for other journals: the CDC is announcing a Systematic Reviews journal, for instance.

QUESTIONS (>39:30):

  • Process by which “KNOL-journal” is considered for inclusion in NLM?
    • Decide: is it in scope?, implicit policy (health peer review being done), who are the people involved, look at a dozen articles.
  • As the content in PMC increases, will it become possible to search in the full text, just like in Google Scholar?
    • Actually the full text is searchable in PMC as apposed to PubMed, but we are not that happy with the full text retrieval. Even with a really good approach, searching full text works just a little bit better than searching PubMed.
      We are incorporating more of the information of PMC into PubMed, and are working on a separate image database with all the figures from books and articles in PMC (with other search possibilities). Subsets of book(chapter)s (like practice guidelines) will get PubMed abstracts and become searchable in PubMed as well.
  • Are there ways to track a full list of our institutions OA articles in PMC (not picking up everything in PubMed)
    • Likely NIH will be contacting offices responsible for research to let them know what articles are out of compliance,  get their assistance in making sure that those get in.
    • Authors can easily update the electornic My Bibliography (in My NCBI in PubMed).
    • Author ID project, involves computational disambiguation. Where you are asked if you are the author of a paper if you didn’t include it. It may also be possible to have automatic reporting to the institutions.
  • What did it took politically to get the appropriation bill passed (PMC initiative)?
    • Congress always pushed more open access, because it was already spending money on the research. Most of the initiative came more from librarians (i.e. small libraries not having sufficient access) and government, than from the NIH.
  • Is there way to narrow down to NIH, free full text papers from PMC?
    • In PubMed, you can filter free full text articles in general via the limits.
  • Are all the articles deposited in PMC submitted the final manuscript?
    • Generally, yes.

HT: @bentoth on Twitter





The University Library (UBA) goes Mobile.

4 04 2010
UBA mobielOur Medical Library at the AMC hospital is one of main (autonomous) libraries of the UBA, the University Library of the University of Amsterdam.

The UBA developed the Spoetnik (library 23 things-like) course -inspiring the start of this blog-, has a library-coach with chat function, a library blog (UBA-e), and is now on Twitter as @bibliotheekuva.
Plus, as I just learned, a small team of the UBA recently launched a mobile version of the library website.

I like their approach. This team consisting of Driek Heesakkers (project leader), Lukas Koster, Gre Ootjers, Roxana Popistasu en Alice Doek, realized this “perpetual beta version” in no more than 7 weeks (from first meeting till launch at April 1st). There aim was not to strive for perfection, but to develop a version first and to learn from their mistakes and the feedback from the users. Thus highly interactive.

Another excellent principle was that they designed ONE mobile app for all smart phones.

This is what UBA mobile offers right now:

  • The library catalog (searching; reserve items; renew loans)
  • Opening hours and addresses of library locations
  • Locations (on a map)
  • Contact phone numbers
  • Questions, feedback
  • News via @bibliotheekuva-tweets

The most important feature, full access to the digital library (with link to all subscriptions) is not yet realized.

I hope our medical library will follow this shining example. Many medical students and doctors use smart-phones and I’m sure a digital version of our medical library website would surely be appreciated by our clients.

Mobile is the future. What do you think?

Below a short and clear presentation by Lukas Koster at UGUL (UGame ULearn) 2010.

The web address of the mobile site is: http://cf.uba.uva.nl/mobiel.

Short notice about UBA mobile at the news section of the UBA.

Janneke Staaks (librarian for: Psychology, Cultural Anthropology and Pedagogical and Educational Sciences) has dealt more in depth with this subject. See this post at her (Dutch) blog FMG Library.