Webicina Presents: PeRSSonalized Medical Librarianship: Selected Blogs, News, Journals and More

13 08 2010

One and a half-year ago I wrote about PeRSSonalized Medicine, developed by Bertalan Mesko or Berci. It is part of Webicina, which “aims to help physicians and other healthcare people to enter the web 2.0 era with quality medical information and selected online medical resources”.

The RSS in PeRSSonalized Medicine stands for Real Simple Syndication, which is a format for delivering regularly changing web content, i.e. from Journals. However, if you use PeRSSonalized Medicine, you don’t need to have a clue what RSS is all about. It is easy to use and you can personalize it (hence the name)

In the previous post I discussed several alternatives of PeRSSonalized Medicine. You can never tell how a new idea, or project or a new business will develop. We have seen Clinical Reader come and disappear. PeRSSonalized Medicine however really boomed. Why? Because it is free, because it has an altruistic goal (facilitate instead of earning money), because users are involved in the development and because it keeps evolving on basis of feedback.

PeRSSonalized Medicine develops fast. There is not a week that I don’t see a new section: Nephrology, Genetics, Diabetes whatever.

And this week tada tada tada … it is the turn of the Medical Librarianship, with Journals, Blogs, News and Web 2.0 tools. Please have a look yourself. You can personalize it at wish, and if you miss something, please mail to Webicina.

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MedLibs Round: Update & Call for Submissions June 2010

4 06 2010

In the past months we had some excellent hosts of the round, really “la crème de la crème” of the medical information/libarary blogosphere:

2010 was heralded by Dr Shock MD PhD, followed by Emerging Technologies Librarian (@pfanderson) The Krafty Librarian (@krafty) and @Eagledawg (Nikki Dettmar).

Nikki  hosted the round for a second time, but now on her new blog: Eagledawg.net. The title: E(Patients)-I(Pad)-O(pportunities):Medlibs Round

Last Month the round was hosted by Danni (Danni4info) at The Health Informaticist, my favorite English EBM-library blog. It is a great round again, about “dealing with PubMed trending analysis, liability in information provision, the ‘splinternet’, a search engine optimisation (SEO) teaser from CILIP’s fresh off the presses Update magazine, and more. Missed it? You can read it here.

And now we have a few days left to submit our posts for the Next MedLibs Round, hosted by yet another excellent EBM/librarian blogger: @creaky at EBM and Clinical Support Librarians@UCHC.

She would like posts about “Reference Questions (or People) I Won’t Forget” (thus “memorable” encounters that took place in a public service/reference desk setting, over your career) or “how the library/librarian” has helped you.
But as always other relevant and good quality posts related to medical information and medical librarianship will also be considered.

For more details see the (2nd!) Call for submissions post at EBM and Clinical Support Librarians@UCHC

I am sure you all have a story to tell. So please share it with @creaky and us!

As always, you can submit the permalink (URL) (of your post(s) on your blog) here.

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I would also like to take the opportunity to ask if there are any med- or medlib-bloggers out there who would like to host the MEDLIBS round August, September, October.

The MEDLIBs Round is still called the MedLibs round because I got too little response (6 votes including mine) to the poll with other name suggestions. Neither did I get any suggestions regarding the design of the MEDLIBS-logo, Robin of Survive the Journey has offered to make [for details see request here]. I hope you will take the time to fill in the poll below, and to think about any suggestions for a logo. Thanks!

@ links to the twitteraccounts





Medlibs Round 1.9 – Call for Submissions

30 11 2009

The MedLib’s Round Blog Carnival is a monthly blog carnival that showcases excellent posts in medical librarianship. The  carnival is not restricted to librarians – anyone can submit as long as the post is relevant and of good quality. If you have an article on medical librarianship, PubMed, evidence-based medicine, information literacy or Web 2.0 tools etc., you’re welcome to submit to our next host, Knowledge beyond words. There is no special theme.

If you have no personal blog, be my guest to post an article at this blog.

Please submit your article before December 5th through this form. The MedLib’s Round 1.9 should be available on December 8th.

An archive of all previous editions of MedLibs Round is listed at the MedLib’s Archive on Laika’s MedLibLog.

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MedLib’s Round 1.5 at Pharmamotion

5 08 2009

The new Medlib’s Round (vol 1. no 5) with a compilation of interesting posts in the field of medical librarianship is up at Pharmamotion run by Flavio Guzmán. This is the first -and hopefully not the last- time that a MD has offered to host the round. Indeed the MedLib’s round is not only aimed at medical librarians, but also at physicians, researchers, nurses etcetera.

Please enjoy reading the posts at: MedLib’s Round 1.5: the best of medical librarianship. For those not knowing much about Medical librarianship, Flavio has embedded a short video about medical librarians.

Want to stay informed? You can take a RSS subscription to the Medlib’s Round. An aggregated feed of credible, rotating health and medicine blog carnivals is also available (thanks Walter Jessen).

The next round will be hosted by Laika’s Medliblog, September 8th.
Please submit your
favorite blog article to the next edition of MedLib’s Round before or at September 5 by using the carnival submission form (here) (!). Submission to the form makes it easier for the host to summarize the articles.

My advise: already start submitting links of good posts if you have them, and bookmark the submission form. September is sooner than you think. For links to Faqs and previous posts see the Medlib’s archive.

p.s. Perhaps you would like to host a future edition as well. If so, please inform me which edition you would like to host.

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Stories 3. Science or Library Work: what is more rewarding?

20 04 2009

2267526122_f4376fc6bfAmy Tenderich of Diabetesmine, will celebrate her birthday at the very same day as she hosts the next Grand Round. She has therefore chosen a very appropriate theme (see announcement):

I’m favoring any and all posts having to do with birthdays and special occasions – or anything that smacks of serendipity, perks, or gifts related to the work you all do.

First of all I would like to congratulate Amy on her birthday.

I have been hesitating whether I should contribute to this round. It is not an easy subject and a bit out of scope. However, thinking about it, many ideas came up and it even became difficult to choose one. But here it is. It is even the first post in a series: STORIES, a selection of personal stories.

Most of you will know that I’m a medical librarian by profession, but a medical biologist by education. Many years I worked as a scientist, with mice, patients, cells, DNA and proteins.3419163183_91968b96d6

I was an avid scientist. My motivation was to unravel mechanisms and understand life. I liked to ask questions: “why is this? why do I find that? how does it work?” The greatest reward you can get is: looking for explanations and finding the answer to a question. Thinking about it and discussing it with others is exciting.The more difficult a question is, the more rewarding it is to find the answer. The gift that science gives you is science itself.

In those twenty years I did have my little successes. I had a press conference at a congress (1) (because it was the only subject that was understandable for the public) and I had two papers that were frequently cited (2).

The finding that gave rise to those two publications was very serendipitous. We found a very tiny band in B cells that were used as a negative (!) control for follicular lymphoma in a PCR for the t(14;18) chromosomal translocation. This translocation is considered the hallmark of this type of B-cell cancer. If this was true, it would mean that the lymphoma-associated t(14;18) involving the BCL2 oncogene could also occur outside the context of malignancy. My task was to prove that this was true. This was not an easy task, because we had to exclude that the tiny bands in the tonsils were due to contamination with exponentially amplified tumor DNA. A lot of tricks were needed to enable direct sequencing of the tonsil DNA to show that each chromosomal breakpoint was unique. To be honest, there were quite some moments of despair and most of the time I believed I was hunting ghosts. Certainly when the first band I sequenced was from a contaminating tumor. But finally we succeeded.

And although science can be very rewarding:

  • Most ideas aren’t that new.
  • There are many dead leads and negative results (see cartoon).
  • Experiments can fail.
  • There is a lot of competition
  • It takes very long before you get results (depending on the type of experiment)
  • It takes even longer before you get enough results to publish
  • It takes still longer before you have written down the first version of the paper
  • … and to wait for the first comments of the co-authors (see cartoon)
  • … and to rewrite the paper and to wait …
  • … and to submit to the journal and wait..
  • … to get the first rejection, because your paper didn’t get a high enough priority
  • and to rewrite, wait for the comments of the co-authors, adapt and submit
  • to be rejected for the second time by referees that don’t understand a bit of your subject or are competitors
  • to rewrite etcetera, till it is accepted…and published
  • to wait till somebody other than you or your co-authors find the paper relevant enough to cite.
  • but most importantly even with very good results that make you feel very happy and content:
    • each answer raises more questions
    • most research, whatever brilliant, is just a drop in the ocean or worse:
    • it gets invalidated

I loved to do research and I loved to be a researcher. However, it is difficult for post-doc to keep finding a job and wait for the contract renewals each year. So almost 4 years ago, just before another renewal of the contract, I was happy to get the opportunity to become a medical librarian at a place not far from where I lived. In fact, after all these years it is my first permanent job.

And it is a far more rewarding job than I ever had before, although perhaps not as challenging as research.

  • Results are more immediate.
  • Answers are clearcut (well mostly)
  • People (doctors, nurses, students) are very happy when you learn them how to search (well generally)
  • they are also happy when you do the search for them
  • or when you help them doing it
  • It is very rewarding to develop courses, to teach, to educate
  • the job has many facets

The rewards can vary from a happy smile, a hand shake and “a thank you” to acknowledgments and even co-authorships in papers. Sometimes I even get tangible presents, like chocolates, cookies, wine or gift tokens.

Last week a patron suddenly said when seeing the presents gathered: “Is it your birthday?”
Presumably it is about time to drink the wine I got.Cheers!

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Photo credits (Flickr-CC):





MedLib’s Round 1.3

8 04 2009

The 3rd Medlib’s Round, a blog carnival of medical-library related blogposts, is up at First Person Narrative. Anne Welsh did a great job pulling together an interesting collection of posts.

From Anne’s introduction

This month’s theme was “evidence” – not just in the terms of “Evidence Based Medicine” but in the widest possible sense. Evidence is a hot topic in the UK at the moment – indeed, the National Library for Health (NLH) is to be relaunched at the end of this month as NHS Evidence, “a web-based service that will help people find, access and use high-quality clinical and non-clinical evidence and best practice.”

Please have a look at the First Person Narrative and enjoy reading.

Want to stay informed? You can take a RSS subscription to the Medlib’s Round. An aggregated feed of credible, rotating health and medicine blog carnivals is also available (thanks Walter Jessen)

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The Next MedLib’s Round will be hosted by Nicole S. Dettmar at Eagle Dawg Blog. Nikki is a medical librarian at the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM). The main theme will be PubMed or 3rd party PubMed tools. Post addressing this subject will get extra emphasis.

You can submit the permalink (url) of the post (you have already written on your blog) at the Blog Carnival submission form (you have to login, scroll down (!), submit links to selected posts and give an optional description). Don’t forget to submit before Saturday May 2, 2009 round midnight (EST)

Perhaps you would like to host a future edition as well. If so, please inform me which edition (June, July or August) you would like to host.

Further Reading:





MedLib’s Round 1.2

11 03 2009

dragonfly

The second Medlib’s Round is up at Dragonfly. This month’s edition of the blog carnival has a loose theme: “enhancing access to health information for health professionals and the public.”

Alison (@aldricham) did a superb job compiling all the submitted post (read them here)

Like the first Medlib’s Round, both medical librarians and doctors (at least 4 MD’s) contributed to the carnival.

I’m not giving anything away, please go to Dragonfly and enjoy reading the carnival.

We hope that you keep contributing to the Medlib’s Round and if you haven’t done so, to give it a try. The more good quality posts, the better.

Submit your blog article (only the link) to the next edition of Medlib’s Round using our carnival submission form. Past posts and future hosts can be found on our blog carnival index page.

The April edition will be hosted by Anne Welsh at First Person Narrative.
Look for it on April 7 or take a subscription to the Medlib’s Round by email or RSS feed.
An aggregated feed of credible, rotating health and medicine blog carnivals is also available (thanks Walter Jessen)