I Got the Wrong Request from the Wrong Journal to Review the Wrong Piece. The Wrong kind of Open Access Apparently, Something Wrong with this Inherently…

27 08 2011

Meanwhile you might want to listen to “Wrong” (Depeche Mode)

Yesterday I screened my spam-folder. Between all male enhancement and lottery winner announcements, and phishing mails for my bank account, there was an invitation to peer review a paper in “SCIENCE JOURNAL OF PATHOLOGY”.

Such an invitation doesn’t belong in the spam folder, doesn’t it? Thus I had a closer look and quickly screened the letter.

I don’t know what alarmed me first. The odd hard returns, the journal using a Gmail address, an invitation for a topic (autism) I knew nothing about, an abstract that didn’t make sense and has nothing to do with Pathology, the odd style of the letter: the informal, but impersonal introduction (How are you? I am sure you are busy with many activities right now) combined with a turgid style (the paper addresses issues of value to our broad-based audience, and that it cuts through the thick layers of theory and verbosity for them and makes sense of it all in a clean, cohesive manner) and some misspellings. And then I never had an invitation from an editor, starting with the impersonal “Colleagues”… 

But still it was odd. Why would someone take the trouble of writing such an invitation letter? For what purpose? And apparently the person did know that I was a scientist, who does -or is able to- peer review medical scientific papers. Since the mail was send to my Laika Gmail account, the most likely source for my contact info must have been my pseudonymous blog. I seldom use this mail account for scientific purposes.

What triggered my caution flag the most, was the topic: autism. I immediately linked this to the anti-vaccination quackery movement, that’s trying to give skeptic bloggers a hard time and fights a personal, not a scientific battle. I also linked it to #epigate, that was exposed at Liz Ditz I Speak of Dreams, a blog with autism as a niche topic.

#Epigate is the story of René Najeraby aka @EpiRen, a popular epidemiologist blogger who was asked to stop engaging in social media by his employers, after a series of complaints by a Mr X, who also threatened other pseudonymous commenters/bloggers criticizing his actions. According to Mr. X no one will be safe, because all i have to do is file a john doe – or hire a cyber investigator. these courses of action cost less than $10,000 each; which means every person who is afraid of the light can be exposed”  In another comment at Liz Ditz’ he actually says he will go after a specific individual: “Anarchic Teapot”.

Ok, I admit that the two issues might be totally coincidental, and they probably are, but I’m hypersensitive for people trying to silence me via my employers (because that did happen to me in the past). Anyway,asking a pseudonymous blogger to peer-review might be a way to hack the real identity of such a blogger. Perhaps far-fetched, I know.

But what would the “editor” do if I replied and said “yes”?

I became curious. Does The Science Journal of Pathology even exist?

Not in PubMed!!

But the Journal “Science Journal of Pathology” does exist on the Internet…. and John Morrison is the editor. But he is the only one. As a matter of fact he is the entire staff…. There are “search”, “current” and “archives” tabs, but the latter two are EMPTY.

So I would have the dubious honor of reviewing the first paper for this journal?…. 😉

  1. (First assumption – David) – High school kids are looking for someone to peer review (and thus improve) their essays to get better grades.
    (me: school kids could also be replaced by “non-successful or starting scientists”)
  2. (Second assumption – David) Perhaps they are only looking to fill out their sucker lists. If you’ve done a bad review, they may blackmail you in other to keep it quiet.
  3. (me) – The journal site might be a cover up for anything (still no clue what).
  4. (me) – The site might get a touch of credibility if the (upcoming) articles are stamped with : “peer-reviewed by…”
  5. (David & me) the scammers target PhD’s or people who the “editors” think have little experience in peer reviewing and/or consider it a honor to do so.
  6. (David & me) It is phishing scam.You have to register on the journal’s website in order to be able to review or submit. So they get your credentials. My intuition was that they might just try to track down the real name, address and department of a pseudonymous blogger, but I think that David’s assumption is more plausible. David thinks that a couple of people in Nigeria is just after your password for your mail, amazon, PayPal etc for “the vast majority of people uses the same password for all logins, which is terribly bad practice, but they don’t want to forget it.”

With David, I would like to warn you for this “very interesting phishing scheme”, which aims at academics and especially PhD’s. We have no clue as to their real intentions, but it looks scammy.

Besides that the scam may affect you personally, such non-existing and/or low quality open access journals do a bad service to the existing, high quality open access journals.

There should be ways to remove such scam websites from the net.

Notes

“Academic scams – my wife just received a version of this for an Autism article, PhD/DPhil/Masters students beware that mentions a receipt of a similar autism”
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The Second #TwitJC Twitter Journal Club

14 06 2011

In the previous post I wrote about  a new initiative on Twitter, the Twitter Journal Club (hashtag #TwitJC). Here, I shared some constructive criticism. The Twitter Journal Club is clearly an original and admirable initiative, that gained a lot of interest. But there is some room for improvement.

I raised two issues: 1. discussions with 100 people are not easy to follow on Twitter, and 2. walking through a checklist for critical appraisals is not the most interesting to do (particularly because it had already been done).

But as one of the organizers explained, the first session was just meant for promoting #twitjc. Instead of the expected 6 people, 100 tweople showed up.

In the second session, last Sunday evening, the organizers followed a different structure.

Thus, I thought it would only be fair, to share my experiences with the second session as well. This time I managed to follow it from start to finish.

Don’t worry. Discussing the journal club won’t be a regular item. I will leave the organization up to the organizers. The sessions might inspire me, though, to write a blog post on the topic now and then. But that may only work synergistic. (at least for me, because it forces me to rethink it all)

This time the discussion was about Rose’s Prevention Paradox (PDF), a 30 year old paper that is still relevant. The paper is more of an opinion piece, therefore the discussion focused on the implications of the Prevention Paradox theory. It was really helpful that Fi wrote an introduction to the paper, and a Points of Discussion beforehand. There were 5 questions (and many sub-questions).

I still found it very hard to follow it all at Twitter, as illustrated by the following tweet:

  • laikas I think I lost track. Which question are we? #twitjc Sun Jun 12 20:07:03
  • laikas @MsPhelps ik werd wel helemaal duizelig van al die tweets. Er zijn toch wel veel mensen die steeds een andere vraag stellen voor de 1e is beantwoord -9:47 PM Jun 12th, 2011 (about instant nausea when seeing tweets rolling by and people already posing a new question before the first one is answered)

I followed the tweets at http://tweetchat.com/room/twitjc. Imagine tweets rolling by and you try to pick up those tweets you want to respond to (either bc they are very relevant, or because you disagree). By the time you have finished your tweet, already 20 -possibly very interesting tweets- passed by, including the next question by the organizers (unfortunately they didn’t use the official @twitjournalclub account for this).

Well, I suppose I am not very good at this. Partly because I’m Dutch (thus it takes longer to compose my tweets), partly because I’m not a fast thinker. I’m better at thorough analyses, at my blog for instance.

But this is Twitter.  To speak with Johan Cruyff, a legendary soccer-player from Holland, “Every disadvantage has its advantage”.

Twitter may not favor organized discussions, but on the other hand it is very engaging, thought-provoking and easy accessible. Where else do you meet 100 experts/doctors willing  to exchange thoughts about an interesting medical topic?

The tweets below are in line with/reflect my opinion on this second Twitter Journal Club (RT means retweeting/repeating the tweet):

  • laikas RT @themattmak@fidouglas @silv24 Congratulations again on a great #twitjc. Definitely more controversial and debate generating than last week’s! -9:18 PM Jun 12th, 2011
  • laikas @silv24 well i think it went well (it is probably me, I’m 2 slow). This paper is broad, evokes much discussion & many examples can B given -9:45 PM Jun 12th, 2011
  • DrDLittle Less structure to #twitJC last night but much wider debate 7:41 AM Jun 13th, 2011
  • amitns @DrDLittle It’s obviously a very complex topic, more structure would have stifled the debate. A lot of food for thought.#twitJC -7:45 AM Jun 13th, 2011

Again, the Twitter Journal Club gained a lot of interest. Scientist and teachers consider to borrow the concept. Astronomers are already preparing their first meeting on Thursday… And Nature seems to be on top of it as well, as it will interview the organizers of the medical and the astronomy journal club for an interview.

Emergency Physician Tom Young with experience in critically appraisal just summarized it nicely: (still hot from the press):

The two meetings of the journal club so far have not focussed in on this particular system; the first used a standard appraisal tool for randomised controlled trials, the second was more laissez-faire in its approach. This particular journal club is finding its feet in a new setting (that of Twitter) and will find its strongest format through trial and error. indeed, to try to manage such a phenomenon might be likened to ‘herding cats’ that often used description of trying to manage doctors, and I think, we would all agree would be highly inadvisable. Indeed, one of its strengths is that participants, or followers, will take from it what they wish, and this will be something, rather than nothing, whatever paper is discussed, even if it is only contact with another Tweeter, with similar or divergent views. 

Indeed, what I gained from these two meetings is that I met various nice and interesting people (including the organizers, @fidouglas and @silv24). Furthermore, I enjoyed the discussions, and picked up some ideas and examples that I would otherwise wouldn’t know about. The last online meeting sparked my interest in the prevention paradox. Before the meeting, I only read the paper at a glance. After the session I decided to read it again, and in more detail. As a matter of fact I feel inspired to write a blog post about this theory. Originally I planned to write a summary here, but probably the post is getting too long. Thus I will await the summary by the organizers and see if I have time to discuss it as well.

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Health Experts & Patient Advocates Beware: 10 Reasons Why you Shouldn’t be a Curator at Organized Wisdom!! #OrganizedWisdom

11 05 2011

Last year I aired my concern about Organized Wisdom in a post called Expert Curators, WisdomCards & The True Wisdom of @organizedwisdom.

Organized Wisdom shares health links of health experts or advocates, who (according to OW’s FAQ), either requested a profile or were recommended by OW’s Medical Review Board. I was one of those so called Expert Curators. However, I had never requested a profile and I seriously doubt whether someone from the a medical board had actually read any of my tweets or my blog posts.

This was one of the many issues with Organized Wisdom. But the main issue was its lack of credibility and transparency. I vented my complaints, I removed my profile from OW, stopped following updates at Twitter and informed some fellow curators.

I almost forgot about it, till Simon Sikorski, MD, commented at my blog, informing me that my complaints hadn’t been fully addressed and convincing me things were even worse than I thought.

He has started a campaign to do something about this Unethical Health Information Content Farming by Organized Wisdom (OW).

While discussing this affair with a few health experts and patient advocates I was disappointed by the reluctant reactions of a few people: “Well, our profiles are everywhere”, “Thanks I will keep an eye open”, “cannot say much yet”. How much evidence does one need?

Of course there were also people – well known MD’s and researchers – who immediately removed their profile and compared OW’s approach with that of Wellsphere, that scammed the Health Blogosphere. Yes, OW also scrapes and steals your intellectual property (blog and/or tweet content), but the difference is: OW doesn’t ask you to join, it just puts up your profile and shares it with the world.

As a medical librarian and e-patient I find the quality, reliability and objectivity of health information of utmost importance. I believe in the emancipation of patients (“Patient is not a third person word”, e-patient Dave), but it can only work if patients are truly well informed. This is difficult enough, because of the information overload and the conflicting data. We don’t need any further misinformation and non-transparency.

I belief that Organized Wisdom puts the reputation of  its “curators” at stake and that it is not a trustworthy nor useful resource for health information. For the following reasons (x see also Simon’s blog post and slides, his emphasis is more on content theft)

1. Profiles of Expert Curators are set up without their knowledge and consent
Most curators I asked didn’t know they were expert curators. Simon has spoken with 151 of the 5700 expert curators and not one of those persons knew he/she was listed on OW. (x)

2. The name Expert Curator suggests that you (can) curate information, but you cannot.
The information is automatically produced and is shown unfiltered (and often shown in duplicate, because many different people can link to the same source). It is not possible to edit the cards.
Ideally, curating should even be more than filtering (see this nice post about 
Social Media Content Curators, where curation is defined as the act of synthesizing and interpreting in order to present a complete record of a concept.)

3. OW calls your profile address: “A vanity URL¹”.

Is that how they see you? Well it must be said they try to win you by pure flattery. And they often succeed….

¹Quote OW: “We credit, honor, and promote our Health Experts, including offering: A vanity URL to promote so visitors can easily share your Health Profile with others, e.g. my.organizedwisdom.com/ePatientDave.
Note: this too is quite similar to the Wellsphere’s approach (read more at E-patients-net)

4. Bots tap into your tweets and/or scrape the content off their website
(x: see healthcare content farms monetizing scheme)

5. Scraping your content can affect your search rankings (x)
This probably affects starting/small blogs the most. I checked two posts of well known blogs and their websites still came up first.

6.  The site is funded/sponsored by pharmaceutical companies.
 “Tailored” ads show up next to the so called Wisdom Cards dealing with the same topic. If no pharmaceutical business has responded Google ads show up instead.
See the form where they actually invite pharma companies to select a target condition for advertizing. Note that the target conditions fit the OW topics.

7. The Wisdom Cards are no more than links to your tweets or posts. They have no added value. 

8. Worse, tweets and links are shown out of context.
I provided various examples in my previous post (mainly in the comment section)

A Cancer and Homeopathy WisdomCard™ shows Expert Curator Liz Ditz who is sharing a link about Cancer and Homeopathy. The link she shares is a dangerous article by a Dr. who is working in an Homeopathic General Hospital, in India “reporting” several cases of miraculous cures by Conium 1M, Thuja 50M and other watery-dilutions. I’m sure that Liz Ditz, didn’t say anything positive about the “article”. Still it seems she “backs it up”. Perhaps she tweeted: “Look what a dangerous crap.”
When I informed her, Liz said:“AIEEEE…. didn’t sign up with Organized Wisdom that I know of”. She felt she was used for credulous support for homeopathy & naturopathy.

Note: Liz card has disappeared (because she opted out), but I was was surprised to find that the link (http://organizedwisdom.com/Cancer-and-Homeopathy/wt/medstill works and links to other “evidence” on the same topic.


9. There is no quality control. Not of the wisdom cards and not of the expert curators.
Many curators are not what I would call true experts and I’m not alone: @holly comments at a Techcrunch postI am glad you brought up the “written by people who do not have a clue, let alone ANY medical training [of any kind] at all.” I have no experience with any kind of medical education, knowledge or even the slightest clue of a tenth of the topics covered on OW, yet for some reason they tried to recruit me to review cards there!?! )

The emphasis is also on alternative treatments: prevention of cancer, asthma, ADHD by herbs etc. In addition to “Health Centers”, there also Wellness Centers (AgingDietFitness etc) and Living Centers (BeautyCookingEnvironment). A single card can share information of 2 or 3 centers (diabetes and multivitamins for example).

And as said, all links of expert curators are placed unfiltered, even when you make a joke or mention you’re on vacation. Whether you’re a  Top health expert or advocate (there is a regular shout-out) just depends on the number of links you share, thus NOT on quality. For this reason the real experts are often at lower positions.

Some cards are just link baits.

 

10.  Organized Wisdom is heavily promoting its site.
Last year it launched activitydigest, automatic digests meant to stimulate “engagement” of expert curators. It tries to connect with top health experts, pharma -people and patient advocates. Hoping they will support OW. This leads to uncritical interviews such as at Pixels and Pills, at Health Interview (
Reader’s Digest + Organized Wisdom = Wiser Patients), Xconomy.com organizedwisdom recruits experts to filter health information on the web.

What can you do?

  • Check whether you have a profile at Organized Wisdom here.
  • Take a good look at Organized Wisdom and what it offers. It isn’t difficult and it doesn’t take much time to see through the facade.
  • If you don’t agree with what it represents, please consider to opt out.
  • You can email info@organizedwisdom.com to let your profile as expert curator removed.
  • If you agree that what OW does is no good practice, you could do the following (most are suggestions of Simon):
  • spread the word and inform others
  • join the conversation on Twitter #EndToFarms
  • join the tweetup on what you can do about this scandal and how to protect yourself from being liable. (more details will be offered by Simon at his regularly updated blogpost)
  • If you don’t agree this Content Farm deserves HONcode certification, notify HON at  https://www.healthonnet.org/HONcode/Conduct.html?HONConduct444558
Please don’t sit back and think that being a wisdom curator does not matter. Don’t show off  with an Organized Wisdom badget, widget or link at your blog or website.  Resist the flattery of being called an expert curator, because it doesn’t mean anything in this context. And by being part of Organized Wisdom, you indirectly support their practice. This may seriously affect your own reputation and indirectly you may contribute to misinformation.

Or as Heidi’s commented to my previous post:

I am flabbergasted that people’s reputation are being used to endorse content without their say so.
Even more so that they cannot delete their profile and withdraw their support.*

For me those two things on their own signal big red flags:

The damage to a health professional’s reputation as a result could be great.
Misleading the general public with poor (yes dangerous) information another

Altogether unethical.

*This was difficult at that time.

Update May 10, 2011: News from Simon: 165 individuals & 5 hospitals have now spoken up about unfolding scandal and are doing something about it (Tuesday )

Update May 12, 2011: If I failed to convince you, please read the post of Ramona Bates MD (@rlbates at Twitter, plastic surgeon, blogger at Suture for a Living), called “More Organized Wisdom Un-Fair Play. Ramona asked her profile to be removed from OW half a year ago).  Recommended pages at her blog seem to be written by other people.
She concludes:

“Once again, I encourage my fellow healthcare bloggers (doctors, nurses, patient advocates, etc) to remove yourself from any association with Organized Wisdom and other sites like them”

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3rd Call for Submissions for “Medical Information Matters”: Tools for Searching the Biomedical Literature

8 05 2011

It takes some doing to breathe life into Medical Information Matters” (blog carnival about medical  information).
A month ago I wrote a 2nd call for submissions post for this blog carnival. Unfortunately the next host, Martin Fenner, didn’t have time to finish a blog post and has come up with a new (interesting) variation on the theme “A Wish list for better medical information”.

Martin asks you to philosophize, blog and/or comment about “Tools for Searching the Biomedical Literature.

You can base your contribution on a recent (editable) survey of 28 different PubMed derivative tools by Zhiyong Lu (NCBI) [1].

Thus, write your thoughts on the various PubMed derivative tools mentioned here or write about your own favorite 3rd party PubMed tool (included or not).

For details, see Martin’s blog post announcing this upcoming edition. The Blog Carnival FAQs are here.

And if you don’t have time to write about this topic, you may still find the survey useful, as well as the views of others on this topic. So check out Martin’s blog Gobbledygook once in a while to see if the blog edition has been posted.

Note [1]: If you have already submitted a post to the carnival, or would like to write about another theme, we will take care that your post (if relevant)  will be included in this or the next edition. You can always submit here.

Note [2]: Would you like to host “Medical Information Matters” at your blog? Please comment here or write to: laika dot spoetnik at gmail dot com. We need hosts for June, July, August and September (submission deadline first Saturday of every month, posting on the next Tuesday)

  1. Lu Z. PubMed and beyond: a survey of web tools for searching biomedical literature. Database. 2011 Jan;2011. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/database/baq036




PubMed’s Shutdown Averted… For Now.

12 04 2011

MEDLINE is the National Library of Medicine‘s (NLM) premier bibliographic database of citations from biomedical journals. The content of MEDLINE is available via commercial, fee-for-service MEDLINE vendors, like OVID.

On June 26, 1997, Vice President Al Gore officially announced free MEDLINE access via PubMed. This was one of the consequences of  the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), a federal law that allows for the full or partial disclosure of previously unreleased information and documents controlled by the United States Government. (http://www.nih.gov/icd/od/foia/index.htm). National Library of Medicine (which is “just” one of the NIH web servers) gives access to many other databases besides PubMed/MEDLINEMeSH, UMLS, ClinicalTrials.gov, MedlinePlus, TOXNET.

I may complain about PubMed once in a while and I may criticize some of its new features, but I cannot imagine a working  life without PubMed. Probably this is even more true for biomedical scientist and physicians who have only access to freely available PubMed and not to OVID MEDLINE, EMBASE and Web of Science, like I do. PubMed and many other NLM databases have become an indispensable source of Medical Information.

We are so used to these free sources, that we take them for granted. Who would imagine that PubMed -or any other great free NLM/NIH database would cease to exists? Still, shutdown of these databases was imminent last weekend. Remarkably it largely went unnoticed, especially for people outside the U.S.

Did you know that there was a great chance of PubMed being killed this weekend?

I happened to get the news via my Twitter stream. I joined in around Friday midnight -Dutch time, 3-4 days ago.

Here are some selected tweets. Have a look. See and feel the panic:

As somebody far from the epicenter  it is hard for me to unravel the logic (?) behind the shutdown threat.

I understand that the near-breakshutdown is the result of the disagreement between the democrats and republicans on the ways to cut the federal costs. By refusing to pass a bill allowing the federal government to be funded, the Republican dominated House of Representatives was forcing a showdown with the White House and Barack Obama. The arrows of the Republicans were mainly directed at Planned Parenthood, the health organisation that Republicans portray as primarily focused on performing abortions, using American taxpayer dollars to do it. However, Planned Parenthood provides an array of services, from screenings for cancer to testing for sexually transmitted diseases (see Huffington post).

Well the tweet of Sarah Palin illustrates the view of the Tea Party (in typical Palin style).

For now, the threat has been averted. The Republicans forced the Democrats to agree to $39bn (£23bn) in spending cuts in this year’s budget to September, $6bn more than the Democrats were prepared to accept earlier this week. In return, the Republicans dropped a demand to cut funding for Planned Parenthood (Guardian). But no one knows whether the aversion is definitive.

This post isn’t meant to dive deep into the US political debate. It is just meant to reflect on the possibility that one of those federal databases, on which we rely, is wiped away overnight, thereby seriously affecting our usual workflows.

Some consequences when PubMed (and MEDLINE?)  would disappear:

  • Many Doctors can no longer search efficiently for medical information (only brows medical journals,  “Google” or look up outdated info).
  • The same is true for many scientists. Look at FlutesUD remarks about the references for her thesis.
  • The disappearance of Pubmed would especially affect rural areas and third world countries.
  • EBM would become difficult to practice:
    • The comprehensive search of PubMed, obligatory for systematic reviews, has to be skipped.
    • It would become almost impossible to do a critical appraised topic (i.e. interns are often used to search/have only access to PubMed)
    • CENTRAL (the largest database of controlled trials) can no longer retrieve its records from PubMed.
  • Librarians can delete many tutorials, e-learning materials and -even- classes.
  • Perhaps many librarians can even say goodbye to their jobs?
  • MYNCBI Saved searches and alerts are gone.
  • MYNCBI Saved papers (collections) are no more.
  • 3rd party Pubmed tools (Novoseek, GoPubMed, HubMed) would also cease to exist.
  • Commercially available MEDLINE sources will be affected as well.
  • By the way clinical.trials.gov, TOXNET etc would also stop. Another hit for librarians, doctors and patients.

For many, disappearance of PubMed is a relative “minor” event compared to the shutdown of other services like the NASA, or healtcare institutions. The near-disappearance of PubMed made me realize how fragile this excellent service is on which we -librarians, physicians, medical students and scientists- rely. On the other hand, it also made me realize how thankful we should be that such a database is available to us for free (yes, even for people outside the US).

Note: (Per 2011-04-14)

I have changed the title from “PubMed’s Sudden Death averted” to “PubMed’s Shutdown averted”, because Death is permanent and it was unknown if the shutdown, if any, would be permanent.

I have also changed some words in the text (blue), thus changed disappearance to “shutdown” for the same reasons as mentioned above.

On the other hand I’ve added some tweets which clearly indicate that the shutdown was not “nothing to worry about”.

The tweets mentioned are not from official resources. And this is what this post is partly about. The panic that results if there is a lack of reliable information. Other main points: (2) the importance of PubMed for biomedical information and (3) that PubMed’s permanent (free) existence is not granted.

Nikki D at Eagledawg describes the event (lack of info and panic) very clearly in her post: Pubmed. Keep Calm and Carry On?

More Info:





Medical Information Matters: 2nd Call For Submissions

1 04 2011

You may have noticed that my blog was barely updated between November and February. Lets say I had the winter blues.

As a consequence, the Blog Carnival “Medical Information Matters” hibernated as well. Unintended… But as a host you need to actively engage in blog carnivals. Else few people will submit.

This is the reason that Martin Fenner at Gobblydook didn’t post “his edition”, but luckily he is willing to give it another try.

Here was his call for submissions (in December). I have adapted it a little to make it “up to date”.

In December April I am hosting the blog carnival Medical Information Matters, a blog carnival about – medical information. The deadline for submissions is next Tuesday this weekend, and I have already received a number of interesting posts. As Christmas is right around the corner, I thought that a good theme for the carnival would be a wish list for better medical information. This could mean many different things, e.g. a database that covers a specific area, better access to fulltext papers or clinical trial results, etc. Please submit your posts here.

So, if you have written (or are able to write) a post which fits in with this topic – or fits in with the broader theme of “medical information” or “medical library matters”, please submit the URL (permalink) of your post HERE at the Blog Carnival.

You may also submit a post of someone else. Tips are also appreciated.

See the archive for more information.

For more ideas about what to submit, here is the previous edition at Dean Giustini’s “The Search Principle blog”Medical Blogging Matters: A Carnival of Ideas, November 2010

And, no this is not a April fools day joke….





Kaleidoscope #3: 2011 Wk 12

23 03 2011

It has been long since I have posted a Kaleidoscope post with a “kaleidoscope” of facts, findings, views and news gathered over the last 1-2 weeks. There have been only 2 editions: Kaleidoscope 1 (2009 wk 47) and 2 (2010 wk 31).

Here is some recommended reading from the previous two weeks. Benlysta (belimumab) approved by FDA for treatment of lupus.

Belimumab is the first new lupus drug approved in 56 years! Thus, potentially good news for patients suffering from the serious auto-immunity disease SLE (systemic lupus erythematosus).  Belimumab needs to be administered once monthly via the intravenous route. It is a fully human monoclonal antibody specifically designed to inhibit B-lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS™), thereby reducing the number of circulating B cells, and the produced ds-DNA antibodies (which are characteristic for lupus).
Two clinical trials showed that more patients experienced less disease activity when treated with belimumab compared to placebo. Data suggested that some patients had less severe flares, and some reduced their steroid doses (not an impressive difference using “eyeballing”). Patients were selected with signs of B-cell hyperactivity and with fairly stable, but active disease. Belimumab was ineffective in Blacks, which are hit hardest by the disease. The most serious side effect were infections: 3 deaths in the belimumab groups were due to infections.
Thus, overall the efficacy seems limited. Belimumab only benefits 35% of the patients with not the worst form of the disease. But for these patients it is a step forward.

  1. Press Announcement (fda.gov).
  2. Navarra SV, Guzmán RM, Gallacher AE, Hall S, Levy RA, Jimenez RE, Li EK,Thomas M, Kim HY, León MG, Tanasescu C, Nasonov E, Lan JL, Pineda L, Zhong ZJ, Freimuth W, Petri MA; BLISS-52 Study Group. Efficacy and safety of belimumab in patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus: a randomised, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial. Lancet. 2011 Feb 26;377(9767):721-31. Epub 2011 Feb 4. PubMed PMID: 21296403.
  3. Belimumab: Anti-BLyS Monoclonal Antibody; Benlysta(TM); BmAb; LymphoStat-B. Drugs in R & D (Open Access): 28 May 2010 – Volume 10 – Issue 1 – pp 55-65 doi: 10.2165/11538300-000000000-00000 Adis R&D Profiles (adisonline.com)

Sleep-deprived subjects make risky gambling decisions.

Recent research has shown, that a single night of sleep deprivation alters decision making independent from a shift in attention: most volunteers moved from seeking to minimize the effect of the worst loss to seeking increased reward. This change towards risky decision making was correlated with an increased brain activity in brain regions that assess positive outcomes (ventromedial prefrontal activation) and a simultaneous decreased activation in the brain areas that process negative outcomes (anterior insula). This was assessed by functional MRI.

One co-author (Chee) noted that “casinos often take steps to encourage risk-seeking behavior — providing free alcohol, flashy lights and sounds, and converting money into abstractions like chips or electronic credits”

Interestingly, Chee also linked their findings to empirical evidence that long work hours for medical residents increased the number of accidents. Is a similar mechanism involved?

  1. Venkatraman V, Huettel SA, Chuah LY, Payne JW, Chee MW. Sleep deprivation biases the neural mechanisms underlying economic preferences.  J Neurosci. 2011 Mar 9;31(10):3712-8 (free full text)
  2. Sleep deprived people make risky decisions based on too much optimism (Duke Healthpress release)

Grand Rounds

Grand Rounds is up at Better Health. Volume 7, Number 26 is an “Emotional Edition” where posts are organized into emotion categories. My post about the hysteria and misinformation surrounding the recent Japanese earthquake is placed under Outrage.

There are many terrific posts included. A few posts I want to mention shortly.

First a post by a woman who diagnosed hers and her sons’ disease after numerous tests. Her sons’ pediatrician only tried to reassure, so it seems. (“don’t worry…”).

I was also moved by the South African surgeon, Bongi, who tells the tragic story of a missed diagnosis that still haunts him. “For every surgeon has a graveyard hidden away somewhere in the dark recesses of his mind…”

Bongi’s blog Other Things Amanzi is one of my favorites. Another blog that has become one of my favs is 33 Charts by Dr. Bryan Vartabedian. Included in this Grand Round is “And a child will lead them“. It is a beautiful post about the loss of a young patient:

….”And facing Cooper’s parents for the first time after his passing was strangely difficult for me.  When he was alive I always had a plan.  Every sign, symptom, and problem had a systematic approach.  But when faced with the most inconceivable process, I found myself awkwardly at odds with how to handle the dialog”….

Other Medical Blogs

Another of my recent fav blogs is the blog of cardiologist, dr. Wes. Two recent posts I would especially like to recommend.

The first asks a seemingly simple question: “So which set of guidelines should doctors use?” The answer, however,  may surprise you.

In another post dr Wes describes the retraction of an online-before-print case report entitled “Spontaneous explosion of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator” with dramatic pictures of an “exploded ICD” .(here is the PDF of the cache). This retraction took place after dr. Wes reported the case at his blog. Strange enough the article was republished this February, with another title, “Case report of out-of-hospital heat dissipation of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator.” (no explosion anymore) and no shocking photos. Food for thought….  The main conclusion of dr Wes? Independent scientific peer-reviewed journals might not be so independent after all. Library matter

Sorry, but I had to laugh about David Rothman’s Common Sense Librarianship: An Ordered List Manifesto. As put it so well by Kathryn Greenhill at her blog Librarians Matter: “It is a hot knife of reason through the butterpat of weighty bullshit that often presses down as soon as we open our mouths to talk about our profession.”

Oh, and a big congrats to Aaron Tay for his  Library Journal moversShakers award. Please read why he deserves this award. What impresses me the most is the way he involves users and converts unhappy users “into strong supporters of the library”. I would recommend all librarians to follow him on Twitter (@aarontay) and to regularly read his blog Musings about Librarianship. Web 2.0

The iPad 2 is here. A very positive review can be found at Techcrunch. The iPad 2 has a camera, is thinner, lighter, and has a much more powerful dual-core chip. Still many people on Twitter complain about the reflective screen. Furthermore the cover is stylish but  not very protective as this blogger noticed 2 days after purchase.
Want to read further: You might like “iPad 2: Thoughts from a first time tablet use” (via @drVes)

It has been five years since Twitter was launched when one of its founders, Jack Dorsey, tweeted “just setting up my twttr’. Now Twitter nearly has 200 million users who now post more than a billion tweets every week. (see Twitter Blog)

Just the other week  Twitter has told developers to stop building apps. It is not exactly clear what this will mean. According to The Next Web it is to prevent confusion of consumers third-party Twitter clients and because of privacy issues. According to i-programmer the decision is mainly driven by the desire of Twitter to be in control of its API and the data that its users create (as to maximize its -future- revenue). I hope it won’t affect Twitter-clients like Tweetdeck and Seesmic, which perform much better (in my view) than Twitter.com.