Friday Foolery #20 What is in an element’s name?

19 03 2010

You probably know the periodic table of elements. The  table contains 118 confirmed elements, from 1 (H, hydrogen) to 118 (Uuo, Ununoctium).

In Wikipedia. you have a nice large periodic table with chemical symbols, that link to the Wikipedia pages on the individual elements (left).

As a chemist, David Bradley at Sciencebase must have been bored with it, because he designed an unusual version of the periodic table, where the chemical symbols will take you to his various accounts online rather than information about a given chemical. Quite a few elements remained and he invited other research bloggers to claim an element if your or your blog’s name fit in terms of initial letters. David started this morning and in about a few hours almost the entire table was filled.

I claimed Li (my surname), but that was already taken by David’s Linkedin account and he suggested that I should take La of Laikas. La is Lathanum.

Of course this can be hilarious. I tweeted to Andrew Spong that he would surely fit As (Arsenicum) -poisonous as you may know- and he replied he would rather choose absinth, which unfortunately isn’t an element.

There are still a few elements left. Thus if you would like your site highlighted as an element, let David know via Twitter, give him the link to your blog and an appropriate element.

This is how the table looks. You can go to the table here (with real links).
The original post is here

And if you don’t particularly care about this table, perhaps the following adaptation suits you better. It is still available via Amazon (click on the Figure).

This table was also found on David’s blog ( see here)

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Research Blogging Awards 2010

5 03 2010

Research Blogging Awards 2010It is now possible to vote for the winners of the 2010 Research Blogging Awards.

Yet another blog contest, I can hear you say.

Yes, another blog contest, but a very special one. It is a contest among outstanding bloggers who discuss peer-reviewed research.

There are over 1,000 blogs registered at ResearchBlogging.org., responsible for 9,500 posts about peer-reviewed journal articles.

By February 11, 2010, readers had made over 400 nominations. Then, according to researchblogging.org, “the expert panel of judges painstakingly assessed the nominees to select 5 to 10 finalists in each of 20 categories”.

The categories include:

  • Research Blog of the Year  with some excellent blogs like Neuroskeptic (RB page) and Science-Based Medicine (RB page)
  • Blog Post of the Year
  • Research Twitterer of the Year including David Bradley, Dr. Shock and Bora Zivkovic
  • Best New Blog (launched in 2009)
  • Best Expert-Level blog 
  • Best Lay-Level blog 
  • Funniest Blog 
  • Blogs in other languages, like German and Chinese
  • Blogs according to specialty like Biology, Health, Clinical Research, NeuroScience, Psychology etc

I was surprised and honored to note that Laika’s MedLiblog is finalist in the section Philosophy, Research, or Scholarship. Another librarian, Anne Welsh of First Person Narrative is also finalist in this section.

  1. First Person Narrative (RB page)
  2. Christopher Leo (RB page)
  3. The Scientist (RB page)
  4. Laika’s MedLibLog (RB page)
  5. Good, Bad, and Bogus (RB page)

It is now up to you, researchbloggers to vote for your favorite blogs. You don’t need to vote for all categories. It is simply too much and in case of Chinese blogs wouldn’t make much sense either.

You can only cast your vote if you are registered with ResearchBlogging.org.
If you’re not registered (and you blog about peer-reviewed research), you still have time to register. See here for more information. This way you can vote, and most important, can contribute to ResearchBlogging.org. with your review of peer reviewed scientific articles.

Voting closes on March 14, and awards will be announced on ResearchBlogging.org on March 23, 2010.