Email/RSS feed to the MedLib’s Round and other Medical Blog Carnivals.

5 03 2009

There are several noteworthy medical blog carnivals (Grand Rounds) around, but it is difficult to make (and thus take) an email/RSS feed to these carnivals, because the editions are hosted by different bloggers each time.

Recently Walter Jessen of the Highlight HEALTH Network has managed to make a feed to all important medical blog carnivals (based on bookmarks).

I’m very pleased that Walter also took the initiative to make a feed to the MedLib’s Round. You can subscribe to it by clicking this link. This is a superb way to keep up to date with the latest MedLib’s Round.

carnival-rss

It is also possible to take one subscription to all medical blog carnivals at once by clicking here.

Alternatively you can take RSS/email feeds to individual blog carnivals at Walter Jessen’s Highlight HEALTH Network:

Presently the following 10 carnivals are included:

  1. Grand Rounds Blog Carnival
  2. Encephalon Blog Carnival
  3. SurgeXperiences Blog Carnival
  4. Medicine 2.0 Blog Carnival
  5. Change of Shift Blog Carnival
  6. Cancer Research Blog Carnival
  7. Health Wonk Review Blog Carniva
  8. Gene Genie Blog Carnival
  9. MedLibs Round
  10. Palliative Care Grand Rounds

Thanks Walter for this initiative.

———————————————

You may also want to read:

Advertisements




PeRSSonalized Medicine – and its alternatives

27 02 2009

perssonalized_medicineA few posts back I just discussed that Personalized Genetics has not fulfilled its promise yet. But what about PeRSSonalized Medicine, just launched by Bertalan Mesko?

Bertalan Meskó is a medical student from Hungary, who runs the award-winning medical blog Scienceroll. According to the web 2.0 model of Hugh Carpenter, mentioned in a previous post, Bertalan (Berci) just finished his journey as a Web 2.0 jedi: he started a web 2.0 company: Webicina. Webicina offers a personalized set of web 2.0 tools to help medical professionals and patients enter the web 2.0 world.

To be honest I was a bit skeptical at first. When I think of web 2.0, I think of it as *open, *collaborative, *creative commons, *networking, ****collective intelligence (Elizabeth Koch). Web 2.0 exists by the mere fact that people want to share information for free. Later I realized that this initiative is comparable to individualized courses that you have to pay for as well. Webicina will also offer some free tools, especially for patients.

One such free tool is PeRSSonalized Medicine. The RSS in PeRSSonalized Medicine stands for Real Simple Syndication, which is a format for delivering regularly changing web content, i.e. from Journals. PeRSSonalized Medicine is a free tool meant to help those users who cannot spend much time online (e.g. medical professionals). It helps them track medical journals, blogs, news and web 2.0 services really easily and creates one personalized place where they can follow international medical content without having a clue what RSS is about (see post at Scienceroll)

persssonalized-medicine-tabs

PeRSSonalized Medicine has a beautiful and straightforward interface. There are 5 separate sources you can follow: (1) Medical Journals, (2) Blogs, (3) News and (4) Media (including Youtube channels, Friendfeed rooms or Del.icio.us tags), and (5) “articles” in PubMed (to setup this you have to perform a search in a separate toolbar).

The items included are partly of general interest -i.e. the Medical Journals includes 13 titles, including the BMJ, the JAMA and the Lancet-, partly it is very specialized, i.e. on the field of genetics. A lot of Journals are not included and Web 2.0 sources tend to be more represented than the official media/journals.Thus this tool seems most suited for the generalist and people wanting to follow web 2.0 tools. On the other hand – and this is a clear advantage- the content develops as wishes and suggestions are taken into account.

Each Tab can be personalized by simply hiding the titles you don’t want to include (under the button personalize it), but settings are only saved after registration.

The view of the personalized page is pleasant and neat. You see short titles of the 10 latest articles of the sources you have subscribed to. Moving your mouse over the titles will reveal more information and once you clicked the link it turns grey instead of blue. What I miss is the button: more, so you can catch up if you have missed older articles. Especially with media and journals that often have more than 10 new articles per issue, even more so if the first 10 titles consist of “obituaries” (BMJ).

The latest addition to PeRSSonalized Medicine (5) is the possibility to subscribe to a Pubmed search so “you can also follow the latest articles in your field of interest without going back to PubMed again and again and doing a search for your favourite term. Make this process automatic with PeRSSonalized Medicine.”
However, as most of you may know, you don’t have to go back to Pubmed over and over again to “do” your search, but you can easily subscribe to a search in PubMed either by email (My NCBI) or by RSS (see for instance this post in Dutch). Although the process of subscribing is not as intuitive as it is in PeRSSonalized medicine, PubMed is better suited to design a good search strategy. To keep abreast of the latest information in your field a good search forms the basis. It hurts my heart as a librarian that most web 2.0 people are more fixed on the technique of how to subscribe to a feed (RSS) than on good search results. Remember, it still is: garbage in, garbage out. RSS is just the drain.

As an example I show two RSS feeds below, one with more appropriate terms (pulmonary embolism and d-dimer) than the other (lung embolism and d-dimer). Pulmonary embolism is a MeSH. It is evident that with lung embolism articles will be missed just by choosing wrong/less optimal terms.

pubmed-search-rss-toelichting

Again the presentation of results is pleasant. Apart from the search restrictions I don’t find it very handy to look up each paper in HubMed (for that is where the link takes you).
Personally I prefer regular e-mail-alerts at specific intervals (via MyNCBI). I would like to look up citations either individually (if there is just 1 interesting hit) or all at once (10-50 hits). In PubMed, results can be selected, PDF’s directly downloaded from the library website and citations can be kept in My NCBI Collections or imported into a reference manager system. A RSS-feed of Pubmed searches is also handy (see below).

Alternatives

The idea presented on Webicina, although fancy, is not new. Consider the following alternative web tools, also build on data collected from RSS feeds.

Amedeo

Amedeo is dedicated to the free dissemination of medical knowledge. It is an international free service that will send you weekly literature updates in medical subjects of your choosing. At the same time a personalized website is made, with subscriptions to the journals you selected. You can retrieve the articles in text or in HTML-format. The HTML format brings you to the latest results for that Journal in PubMed. This service seems most suitable for specific medical disciplines. General topics (family physician) are not available, although it is possible to subscribe to for instance the American Journal of Family Physicians. As with all these free literature services, you will have to subscribe. It is easy to select or deselect journals in a category (tick boxes).
Amedeo also has Free Books For Doctors, but no podcasts or blogs. You can search the site, but you cannot easily look up individual journals.

amadeo

—————————————————–

emergency-medicine-2x

MedWorm (and LibWorm)

MedWorm is a free medical RSS feed provider as well a a search engine. It is meant both for doctor and patient. There are many medical categories that you can subscribe to, via the free MedWorm online service, or another RSS reader of your choice, such as Google Reader. The number of RSS-feeds is enormous: >6000. There are a publications directory, a blog directory, a blog tag cloud, consumer health news, discussion and several specific topics, like cancers, drugs, vaccines and education. Within the publications directory there is a further subdivision in: Consumer – Info – Journals – News – Organizations – Podcasts.

Many specialties are represented, including primary care and veterinary science. I tried it out and subscribed to some Addison’s disease related topics, Reuter’s Health and my own blog, which has recently been included. When you subcribe via the Medworm-RSS all news can be read in “My River of News”. It shows the titles and part of the abstracts (see Fig. below).

You can subscribe to single items or categories, but it is not possible to in- and exclude individual feeds within a topic or category by a single action. So within Endocrinology I cannot selectively exclude all diabetes journals, but (as far as I can see) I have to subscribe to each individual journal, if I don’t want the whole package. The loading of the River of News takes long, sometimes.

Together with David Rothman the builder/owner of MedWorm, Frankie Dolan, has also launched Libworm, which is a librarian’s version of MedWorm.

medworm2-home-page-favs

DO IT YOURSELF (or let the library do it for you)

Sometimes the library will set up a personalized start page. See for instance the Dermatology page created with Netvibes at the Central Medical Library, University Medical Center Groningen (UMCG). Doesn’t it look beautiful?

groningen-dermatology-netvibes

I-Google

And isn’t the tool below superb looking? Well, I constructed it myself on basis of what Ves Dimov wrote in the post “Make Your Own “Medical Journal” with iGoogle Personalized Page”, he submitted to the first MedLib”s round. And I had a little “life” help from Ves via Twitter, because things have changed a bit. All you need is a free Google mail (G-mail) account, just go to Google.com/IG (or search the web for I-Google) and subscribe. First you can create your start page with all kind of gadgets (like clock, G-mail inbox and weather forecast, see Figure below) and then you can add other tabs (encircled below). The Medical Journal and Journals Tabs I just took from Ves by clicking on the links he gave in his post: RSS feeds of the “Big Five” medical journals (NEJM, JAMA, BMJ, Lancet and Annals) plus 2-3 subpecialty journals and the podcasts of 4 major medical journals in iGoogle.

Once you have these tabs you can edit them (add, delete, move) as you like.

i-google

I-Google Medical Journals Tab

i-google-start-page-shape-top

I-Google Startpage

RSS-readers

All the above tools are based on RSS, which means Real Simple Syndication. It isn’t called Simple for nothing. You can easily do it yourself, which means that you have more freedom in what you subscribe to. Because I-Google doesn’t scale well beyond 50 or so RSS feeds, other RSS-readers are advisable once you subscribe to many different feeds (see Wikipedia for list and comparison) . I use Google-Reader, shown below, for this purpose.

Generally, adding Feeds is easy. In Firefox you often see the orange RSS-logo in the web browser (just click on it to add the feed) and most Journals and blogs have a RSS-button on their page, that enables subscription to their feed.

google-reader

rss-buttons-at-site-in-browser

As detailed in another (Dutch) Post, numerous Pubmed searches can be easily added to your RSS-reader. You build up a good search in Pubmed, for instance: (pulmonary embolism[mh] OR pulmonary embolism* OR lung embolism*) AND (“Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products”[Mesh] OR d-dimer). In “the Results” you click on “Send To” and choose RSS-Feed and add it to your reader. That’s all.

pubmed-rss

Summary

PeRSSonalized Medicine is a free tool which lets you subscribe to a small and rather skewed selection of journals, news, media and blogs and (straightforward) PubMed searches. The strong points of this tool are: the beautiful design, the ease of use for people not used to web 2.0 tools including RSS, and its continuous development, seeking active input from its users. To speak with dr Shock’s: It is meant for a physician who is not web savvy, never heard of RSS and never wants to, not a geek, nerd, and still wants to stay up to date with health 2.0 or medicine 2.0.”

But there are other free tools around with more (subscription) possibilities and with a little more investment of time you can do it yourself and make subscriptions really perssonalized. Once you know it is simple, believe me.

You may also want to read:

https://laikaspoetnik.wordpress.com/2008/05/05/1-may-rss-day/ (about RSS)

https://laikaspoetnik.wordpress.com/2008/02/15/rss-feed-en-pubmed/ (about RSS and Pubmed – Dutch)





RSS-chair

24 06 2008

I think I want this chair at my library : click here to see 😉

Thanks Berci (from scienceroll) for the tip.





1 May: RSS-DAY

5 05 2008

rss-day

While trying to catch up with my 1000+ hits in Google (RSS) Reader I stumbled across numerous posts  that awared me that May 1st is the RSS awareness day. Since it is May 4th already I clearly missed this.

In the Netherlands May 1st is already “labour day”, and today (May 4th) it is commemoration of the dead (of World War II). For me more important facts/events to be aware of/commemorate/remember than RSS.

The funny thing of course is that the overwhelming amount of RSS-awareness-messages will mainly reach people that already have RSS, because these messages end up in their feeds. 🙂

With respect to RSS: For those of you that are not familiar to RSS here is a (dutch) overview and below a nice video that illustrates the RSS-process

For those who want to know more here is a link to a post which gives Seven Tips for Making the Most of Your RSS Reader.

Tip 1: oversubscribe is already implemented on this blog, the others deserve a closer look, although Tip 2 Try a River of News View will probably enhance the information overload at first.

Tip 7 : Try Out Additional Services seems particularly interesting. Amongst others it describes AideRSS a RSS tool that filters the most popular items in a feed and the Social bookmarking tool Ma.gnolia that makes it easy to make friends with interests similar to your own.

Still interested in another gadget? Here is a link to The YouTube RSS Generator, which will generate a RSS feed of Youtube videos based on Tag, Category, or your personal Youtube playlist. (Thanks to the tip of bakkel.com)

*****************

1 mei blijkt de dag van de RSS zijn. Mijn Google reader stond vol van de berichten hierover. Voor degenen die niet weten wat RSS is, zie hier een overzicht in het Nederlands. Hierboven ook een video.

Voor meer gevorderden onder ons hier een link naar 7 tips om alles uit je RSS te halen. Moet het nog goed doorlezen maar tip 7 lijkt me vooral interessant.

Tevens een link naar de “YouTube RSS Generator”, waarmee je een RSS feed kan maken van You tube video’s door je te abonneren op een Tag, Categorie, of persoonlijke speellijst. (Getipt door bakkel.com).

Ha en inmiddels zijn de Google Reader Feeds weer behapbaar.





BMI bijeenkomst april 2008

21 04 2008

Afgelopen vrijdag 18 April was de Landelijke Dag BMI, CCZ, PBZ en WEB&Z. De BMI is afdeling Biomedische Informatie van de Nederlandse Vereniging voor Beroepsbeoefenaren (NVB). De andere afkortingen staan voor werkgroepen/commissies binnen de NVB: CCZ = Centrale Catalogus Ziekenhuisbibliotheken, BPZ = Bibliothecarissen van Psychiatrische Zorginstellingenen en WEB&Z = voorheen Biomedische werkgroep VOGIN.

Het programma bestond uit 3 ALV’s, van de CCZ, de BPZ en de BMI, afgewisseld met 3 lezingen. Een beetje lastig 3 ALV’s en 1 zaal. Dat betekende in mijn geval dat ik wel de BMI-ALV heb bijgewoond, maar tijdens de andere ALV’s (langdurig) in de koffieruimte annex gang moest wachten. Weliswaar heb ik die nuttig en plezierig doorgebracht, maar het zou wat gestroomlijnder kunnen. Ook vond ik het bijzonder jammer dat er nauwelijks een plenaire discussie was na de lezingen en dat men geacht werd de discussie letterlijk in de wandelgang voort te zetten. En stof tot discussie was er…..

Met name de eerste lezing deed de nodige stof opwaaien. Helaas heb ik deze voor de helft gemist, omdat ik in het station Hilversum dat van Amersfoort meende te herkennen 😉 . Gelukkig heeft Ronald van Dieën op zijn blog ook de BMI-dag opgetekend, zodat ik de eerste punten van hem kan overnemen.

De eerste spreker was Geert van der Heijden, Universitair hoofddocent Klinische Epidemiologie bij het Julius Centrum voor Gezondheidswetenschappen van het UMC Utrecht. Geert is coördinator van het START-blok voor zesdejaars (Supervised Training in professional Attitude, Research and Teaching) en van de Academische Vaardigheden voor het GNK Masteronderwijs. Ik kende Geert oppervlakkig, omdat wij (afzonderlijk) geinterviewd waren voor het co-assistenten blad “Arts in Spe” over de integratie van het EBM-zoekonderwijs in het curriculum. Nu ik hem hier in levende lijve heb gehoord, lees ik zijn interview met heel andere ogen. Ik zag toen meer de overeenkomsten, nu de verschillen.

Zijn presentatie had als titel: “hoe zoekt de clinicus?”. Wie verwachtte dat Geert zou vertellen hoe de gemiddelde clinicus daadwerkelijk zoekt komt komt bedrogen uit. Geert vertelde vooral de methode van zoeken die hij artsen aanleert/voorhoudt. Deze methode is bepaald niet ingeburgerd en lijkt diametraal te staan tegenover de werkwijze van medisch informatiespecialisten, per slot zijn gehoor van dat moment. Alleen al het feit dat hij beweert dat je VOORAL GEEN MeSH moet gebruiken druist in tegen wat wij medisch informatiespecialisten leren en uitdragen. Het is de vraag of de zaal zo stil was, omdat zij overvallen werd door al het schokkends wat er gezegd werd of omdat men niet wist waar te beginnen met een weerwoord. Ik zag letterlijk een aantal monden openhangen van verbazing.

Zoals Ronald al stelde was dit een forse knuppel in het hoenderhok van de ‘medisch informatiespecialisten’. Ik deel echter niet zijn mening dat Geert het prima kon onderbouwen met argumenten. Hij is weliswaar een begenadigd spreker en bracht het allemaal met verve, maar ik had toch sterk de indruk dat zijn aanpak vooral practice- of eminence- en niet evidence-based was.

Hieronder enkele van zijn stellingen, 1ste 5 overgenomen van Ronald:

  1. “Een onderzoeker probeert publicatie air miles te verdienen met impact factors”
  2. “in Utrecht krijgen de studenten zo’n 500 uur Clinical Epidemiology en Evidence Based Practice, daar waar ze in Oxford (roots van EBM) slechts 10 uur krijgen”
  3. “contemporary EBM tactics (Sicily statement). (zie bijvoorbeeld hier:….)
  4. “fill knowledge gaps met problem solving skills”
  5. EBM = eminence biased medicine. Er zit veel goeds tussen, maar pas op….
  6. Belangrijkste doelstelling van literatuuronderzoek: reduceer Numbers Needed to Read.
  7. Vertrouw nooit 2e hands informatie (dit noemen wij voorgefilterde of geaggregeerde evidence) zoals TRIP, UpToDate, Cochrane Systematic Reviews, BMJ Clinical Evidence. Men zegt dat de Cochrane Systematic Reviews zo goed zijn, maar éen verschuiving van een komma heeft duizenden levens gekost. Lees en beoordeel dus de primaire bronnen!
  8. De Cochrane Collaboration houdt zich alleen maar bezig met systematische reviews van interventies, het doet niets aan de veel belangrijker domeinen “diagnose” en “prognose”.
  9. PICO (patient, intervention, comparison, outcome) werkt alleen voor therapie, niet voor andere vraagstukken.
  10. In plaats daarvan de vraag in 3 componenten splitsen: het domein (de categorie patiënten), de determinant (de diagnostische test, prognostische variabele of behandeling) en de uitkomst (ziekte, mortaliteit en …..)
  11. Zoeken doe je als volgt: bedenk voor elk van de 3 componenten zoveel mogelijk synoniemen op papier, verbind deze met “OR”, verbind de componenten met “AND”.
  12. De synoniemen alleen in titel en abstract zoeken (code [tiab]) EN NOOIT met MeSH (MEDLINE Subject Headings). MeSH zijn NOOIT bruikbaar volgens Geert. Ze zijn vaak te breed, ze zijn soms verouderd en je vindt er geen recente artikelen mee, omdat de indexering soms 3-12 maanden zou kosten.
  13. NOOIT Clinical Queries gebruiken. De methodologische filters die in PubMed zijn opgenomen, de zogenaamde Clinical Queries zijn enkel gebaseerd op MeSH en daarom niet bruikbaar. Verder zijn ze ontwikkeld voor heel specifieke onderwerpsgebieden, zoals cardiologie, en daarom niet algemeen toepasbaar.
  14. Volgens de Cochrane zou je als je een studie ‘mist’ de auteurs moeten aanschrijven. Dat lukt van geen kant. Beter is het te sneeuwballen via Web of Science en related articles en op basis daarvan JE ZOEKACTIE AAN TE PASSEN.

Wanneer men volgens de methode van der Heijden werkt zou men in een half uur klaar zijn met zoeken en in 2 uur de artikelen geselecteerd en beoordeeld hebben. Nou dat doe ik hem niet na.

De hierboven in rood weergegeven uitspraken zijn niet (geheel) juist. 8. Therapie is naar mijn bescheiden mening nog steeds een belangrijk domein; daarnaast is gaat de Cochrane Collaboration ook SR’s over diagnostische accuratesse studies schrijven. 13. in clinical queries worden (juist) niet alleen MeSH gebruikt.

In de groen weergegeven uitspraken kan ik me wel (ten dele) vinden, maar ze zijn niet essentieel verschillend van wat ik (men?) zelf nastreef(t)/doe(t), en dat wordt wel impliciet gesuggereerd.
Vele informatiespecialisten zullen ook:

  • 6 nastreven (door 7 te doen weliswaar),
  • 9 benadrukken (de PICO is inderdaad voor interventies ontwikkeld en minder geschikt voor andere domeinen)
  • en deze analoog aan 10 opschrijven (zij het dat we de componenten anders betitelen).
  • Het aanschrijven van auteurs (14) gebeurt als uiterste mogelijkheid. Eerst doen we de opties die door Geert als alternatief aangedragen worden: het sneeuwballen met als doel de zoekstrategie aan te passen. (dit weet ik omdat ik zelf de cursus “zoeken voor Cochrane Systematic Reviews” geef).

Als grote verschillen blijven dan over: (7) ons motto: geaggregeerde evidence eerst en (12) zoeken met MeSH versus zoeken in titel en abstract en het feit dat alle componenten met AND verbonden worden, wat ik maar mondjesmaat doe. Want: hoe meer termen/componenten je met “AND” combineert hoe groter de kans dat je iets mist. Soms moet het, maar je gaat niet a priori zo te werk.

Ik vond het een beetje flauw dat Geert aanhaalde dat er door één Cochrane reviewer een fout is gemaakt, waardoor er duizenden doden zouden zijn gevallen. Laat hij dan ook zeggen dat door het initiatief van de Cochrane er levens van honderd duizenden zijn gered, omdat eindelijk goed in kaart is gebracht welke therapieën nu wel en welke nu niet effectief zijn. Bij alle studies geldt dat je afhankelijk bent van hoe goed te studie is gedaan, van een juiste statistiek etcetera. Voordeel van geaggregeerde evidence is nu net dat een arts niet alle oorspronkelijke studies hoeft door te lezen om erachter te komen wat werkt (NNR!!!). Stel dat elke arts voor elke vraag ALLE individuele studies moet zoeken, beoordelen en moet samenvatten….. Dat zou, zoals de Cochrane het vaak noemt ‘duplication of effort’ zijn. Maar wil je precies weten hoe het zit, of wil je heel volledig zijn dan zul je inderdaad zelf de oorspronkelijke studies moeten zoeken en beoordelen.
Wel grappig trouwens dat 22 van de 70 artikelen waarvan Geert medeauteur is tot de geaggregeerde evidence (inclusief Cochrane Reviews) gerekend kunnen worden….. Zou hij de lezers ook afraden deze artikelen te selecteren? 😉

Voor wat betreft het zoeken via de MeSH. Ik denk dat weinig ‘zoekers’ louter en alleen op MeSH zoeken. Wij gebruiken ook tekstwoorden. In hoeverre er gebruik van gemaakt wordt hangt erg van het doel en de tijd af. Je moet steeds afwegen wat de voor- en de nadelen zijn. Door geen MeSH te gebruiken, maak je ook geen gebruik van de synoniemen functie en de mogelijkheid tot exploderen (nauwere termen meenemen). Probeer maar eens in een zoekactie alle synoniemen voor kanker te vinden: cancer, cancers , tumor, tumour(s), neoplasm(s), malignancy (-ies), maar daarnaast ook alle verschilende kankers: adenocarcinoma, lymphoma, Hodgkin’s disease, etc. Met de MeSH “Neoplasms” vind je in een keer alle spellingswijzen, synoniemen en alle soorten kanker te vinden.

Maar in ieder geval heeft Geert ons geconfronteerd met een heel andere zienswijze en ons een spiegel voorgehouden. Het is soms goed om even wakkergeschud te worden en na te denken over je eigen (soms te ?) routinematige aanpak. Geert ging niet de uitdaging uit de weg om de 2 zoekmethodes met elkaar te willen vergelijken. Dus wie weet wat hier nog uit voortvloeit. Zouden we tot een consensus kunnen komen?

De volgende praatjes waren weliswaar minder provocerend, maar toch zeker de moeite waard.

De web 2.0-goeroe Wouter Gerritsma (WoWter) praatte ons bij over web 2.0, zorg 2.0 en (medische) bibliotheek 2.0. Zeer toepasselijk met zeer moderne middelen: een powerpointpresentatie via slideshare te bewonderen en met een WIKI, van waaruit hij steeds enkele links aanklikte. Helaas was de internetverbinding af en toe niet zo 2.0, zodat bijvoorbeeld deze beeldende YOU TUBE-uitleg Web 2.0 … The machine is us/ing us niet afgespeeld kon worden. Maar handig van zo’n wiki is natuurlijk dat je het alsnog kunt opzoeken en afspelen. In de presentatie kwamen wat practische voorbeelden aan de orde (bibliotheek, zorg, artsen) en werd ingegaan op de verschillende tools van web 2.0: RSS, blogs, gepersonaliseerde pagina’s, tagging en wiki’s. Ik was wel even apetrots dat mijn blog alsmede dat van de bibliotheker even als voorbeeld getoond werden van beginnende (medische bieb) SPOETNIKbloggers. De spoetnikcursus en 23 dingen werden sowieso gepromoot om te volgen als beginner. Voor wie meer wil weten, kijk nog eens naar de wiki: het biedt een mooi overzicht.

Als laatsten hielden Tanja van Bon en Sjors Clemens een duo-presentatie over e-learning. Als originele start begonnen ze met vragen te stellen in plaats van ermee te eindigen. Daarna gaven ze een leuke introductie over e-learning en lieten ze zien hoe ze dit in hun ziekenhuis implementeerden.

Tussen en na de lezingen was er ruim tijd om met elkaar van gedachten te wisselen, aan het slot zelfs onder genot van een borrel voor wie niet de BOB was. Zeker een heel geslaagde dag. Hier ga ik vaker naar toe!

**************************************************************************************************

met de W: ik zie dat de bibliotheker inmiddels ook een stukje heeft geschreven over de lezing van Geert van der Heiden. Misschien ook leuk om dit te lezen.

N.B. VOOR WIE DE HELE PRESENTATIE VAN GEERT WIL ZIEN, DEZE IS MET ZIJN TOESTEMMING GEZET OP

http://www.slideshare.net/llkool/bmi-18-april-2008-geert-van-der-heijden/