More about the Research Blogging Awards

24 03 2010

In my previous post I mentioned that the winners of the very first edition of the Research Blogging Awards are now known.

In Beyond the book* you can hear the First Research Blogging Awards announced (see post).
Here are the podcast and the  transcript of the live interview with the Award organizers Dave Munger of ResearchBlogging.org and Joy Moore of Seed Media.

Dave and Joy talk about blogs in the research space and the reasons behind some of the winners, which include Not Exactly Rocket Science, Epiphenom, BPS Research Digest and Culturing Science.

In the interview Dave and Joy not only talk about the winners but also discuss why it is important that science bloggers write about peer review and form a community. It is also meant “to give people the broader picture about the state of research blogging today online and how all of this is helping to promote science and science literacy and culture throughout the world.”

Two Excerpts from the Transcripts by Moore (which highlights why research blogging is important:

(…..) and what we’re seeing, and it’s quite exciting, is that bloggers, scientist bloggers around the world are putting a lot of very, very thoughtful effort into spontaneously writing about peer reviewed research in a way that is very similar to what you’ll see in say the news and views sections of some of the top science journals. And so what we’re able to see is not only a broader spectrum of coverage of peer reviewed research and interpretation, but we’re also seeing the immediate accessibility to that interpretation through the blogs and it’s open and it’s free and so it’s really opening up the accessibility to views and interpretations of research in a way that we’ve never seen before.

(…..)  One of the most critical aspects of being not only a scientist, but also a blogger is ensuring that you get your work out there and you have recognition and attribution for it and therefore, to continue to encourage the Research Blogging activity, we feel that we can help play a role by ensuring that the bloggers are recognized for their work.

*Beyond the Book is an educational presentation of the not for profit Copyright Clearance Center, with conferences and seminars featuring leading authors and editors, publishing analysts, and information technology specialists.
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Friday Foolery #20 What is in an element’s name?

19 03 2010

You probably know the periodic table of elements. The  table contains 118 confirmed elements, from 1 (H, hydrogen) to 118 (Uuo, Ununoctium).

In Wikipedia. you have a nice large periodic table with chemical symbols, that link to the Wikipedia pages on the individual elements (left).

As a chemist, David Bradley at Sciencebase must have been bored with it, because he designed an unusual version of the periodic table, where the chemical symbols will take you to his various accounts online rather than information about a given chemical. Quite a few elements remained and he invited other research bloggers to claim an element if your or your blog’s name fit in terms of initial letters. David started this morning and in about a few hours almost the entire table was filled.

I claimed Li (my surname), but that was already taken by David’s Linkedin account and he suggested that I should take La of Laikas. La is Lathanum.

Of course this can be hilarious. I tweeted to Andrew Spong that he would surely fit As (Arsenicum) -poisonous as you may know- and he replied he would rather choose absinth, which unfortunately isn’t an element.

There are still a few elements left. Thus if you would like your site highlighted as an element, let David know via Twitter, give him the link to your blog and an appropriate element.

This is how the table looks. You can go to the table here (with real links).
The original post is here

And if you don’t particularly care about this table, perhaps the following adaptation suits you better. It is still available via Amazon (click on the Figure).

This table was also found on David’s blog ( see here)